Working While Retired

Retirement life is different for everyone. Social Security is here to secure today and tomorrow, whether you sail into the sunset or decide to continue working. Some of our rules allow you to receive Social Security retirement or survivor benefits and work at the same time, as long as you don’t make more than Social Security’s annual earnings limit. For 2017, that limit is $16,920.

If you’re younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, we’ll reduce your Social Security benefits. But starting with the month you reach full retirement age, we will not reduce your benefits, no matter how much you earn. Our retirement planner explains the requirement and deductions, and what happens after you reach full retirement age.

Two of our online tools can help you find the information you need to make the right decision for you. You can find your full retirement age based on your date of birth by using our Retirement Age Calculator. Our Retirement Earnings Test Calculator can help you find out how much your benefits may be reduced if you are working and haven’t reached your full retirement age.

There are several things to consider if you plan to continue working after you retire. Our website gives you detailed information for the type of employment that you have. It also explains what types of pensions, annuities, and income do not count toward your earnings limits.

Additional earnings after you start collecting benefits might increase your monthly benefit. If there’s an increase, we’ll send you a letter telling you of your new benefit amount. If you think your earnings will be different than what you originally told us, let us know right away. For more information, read How Work Affects Your Benefits or visit our website. No matter what you decide to do with your retirement life, you can count on Social Security.

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128 thoughts on “Working While Retired

    • You should definitely apply for Medicare within that 6 month period when you turn 65, In your case (April-Aug of that year you turn 65). If you are already receiving Social Security, the Medicare cost will automatically come out of that benefit. If you waiting to apply for Social Security, you will be paying Medicare cost directly until you receive Social Security. Don’t delay applying for Medicare as the cost will go up because of the penalties they will incurr on your cost.

      • To clarify. If you are not already getting retirement benefits, you should contact us about three months before your 65th birthday to sign up for Medicare. If you are already getting Social Security retirement benefits, you will be enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B automatically. Thanks!

      • If she is ALREADY collecting Social Security before age 65, her Medicare will come to her via mail automatically. No need to go apply!! Contact your local HIICAP Counselor…they will fill you in!

    • Thank you for your question, Yolanda. If you are already getting Social Security retirement benefits, you will be enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B automatically. However, because you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you have the option of turning it down. If you are not already getting retirement benefits, you should contact us about three months before your 65th birthday to sign up for Medicare. We hope this information helps!

    • Yes. You are eligible for Medicare if you are 65 years of age, worked 10 years or 40 quarters in the US, or are under age 65 and have a disability.

    • You can apply for Medicare Part B 3 months prior to turning 65. IF you are not currently – or will not be – taking your Social Security, you will need to actively sign up for Medicare Part A & B….then you can either sign up for a Medicare Advantage plan or a Medicare Supplement plan/RX plan. Medicare A & B cover about 80% so you will need either a Medicare Advantage or Medicare Supplement plan to help pay all or most of that 20%. Remember you will have copays for your medications as well.

    • I am now 62. I Work full time. Was married over 30 plus years and recently divorced. Can I work full time and collect now under my x spouse (now 63) even if he is not taken SS until he reaches 66.

    • I turned 65 last year. I started to receive an abundance of communications in the mail. It was overwhelming. I met with my case worker at the Human Services office. She walked me through the entire process. There are also local agencies that can assist you.

    • Hello Yolanda ,
      You should apply for Medicare three(3) months prior to eligibility. In your case in March of next year since you turn 65 years YOUNG in June.
      I have been learning about this since my wife turns 65 in March and l turn 65 years YOUNG in August. Please stay healthy and active.
      God bless you,
      Waleed🕊

    • Sure – That is exactly the right time to apply for Medicare Part A. Other things might impact your decision to apply for Medicare Part B

  1. If I wait until age 70 to start collecting benefits, but I continue working past that date, how can I determine if my benefits will rise with the additional contributions?

      • We currently mail Social Security Statements (Statements) to workers age 60 and over who aren’t receiving Social Security benefits and do not yet have a my Social Security account. Click here for more information.

    • Thank you for your question, Doug. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that was used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically.

    • Remember that the first year you pull Social Security benefits that your earning cap is low – if you earn more than that the first year of SS benefits your SS will taxed quite considerably……after the first year all that changes. PLEASE review with Social Security before you plan on monies you may not receive the first year.

  2. I am 65 years old and I haven’t draw my social security. If I reach the age of 66 years old will my benefits be the same. I am also retired from the Military. Please send me an email of my questions

      • Unfortunately, we do not have access to personal information, therefore, we do not do direct messaging in this venue. Remember that many of our services are conveniently available anytime at our website. We encourage individuals to create a personal my Social Security account to learn more about their Social Security benefits. Thanks!

    • Hi, Wilfredo. You can get both Social Security retirement benefits and military retirement. Generally, we do not reduce your Social Security benefits because of your military benefits. For Social Security retirement benefits, we use the individual’s highest 35 years of earnings to compute monthly benefit amount. However, if you decide to get benefits before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. In the other hand, starting to receive benefits at or after your full retirement age may result in larger benefits. In your case you may need to use our Early or Late Retirement Calculator. Our website provides a Retirement Estimator and various benefit calculators. Which calculator you choose depends on what you want do. Happy planning!

      • Hello,

        Our monthly earnings for 35 years, upon which our SS retirement is based, are adjusted for wage growth (indexed) before they are entered into our retirement calculation. Why is it at age 50 our reported earnings stop being increased by indexing? If we retire at 62 or 66 (Full Retirement Age-FRA), that would mean the last and highest paid 12-15 years of our 35 year wage history (almost half) will not be increased by indexing. What is the logical reason for this after age 50 discrimination?

  3. I retired at 62 because of my back and leg pain. Just had spine surgery in July and I am almost completely out of pain. I plan to take it fairly easy for a while as the doctor told me. Then I may return to one of my hobbies so I can keep active. Thanks for all the updates so if I am ever able to return to a small paying job l can do so. I’m glad you don’t forget about the little guy.

  4. it doesn’t seem fair to me that some people on SSI can get a lot more per month than a Person like myself, who has worked since 1969 straight with never collecting any hand outs like welfare or unemployment. I have a friend who also was a co worker and he is only 35. He does indeed have major medical problems now. He receives $3200 per month with no children and his wife has a good job. If I had paid in the max over my lifetime, at age 66, I could only receive $2540 which is the max. Something is definitely wrong in Washington! The same also applies to people who come to our fine country to live, and they are paid more than us average workers!

    • If you are 65 you can receive SSI also if your income is no more than $20 higher than the SSI full amount. Sounds fair to me. And for those who come to this country, generally they can’t get anything for at least 5 years. Their sponsors have to support them. Maybe you should have had a more substantial job and paid into the max. You didn’t so you only get paid the amount you deserve based upon your earnings. Sounds fair to me.

    • I get over $50K/year in free Social Security Disability and VA Disability money. It was very easy for me to get free tax free disability money for a mental disorder. You see a psychiatrist and before you even walk out of the office, you will have several severe mental disorders diagnosis and several prescriptions to go with each diagnosis. The psychiatrist gets paid by the pharmaceutical companies to write prescriptions and they need to diagnose you with a mental disorder in order to prescribe it. You might not get service-connect by a VA psychiatrist but they will diagnose you with diagnose you with a non-service connected mental disorder when you leave. The psychiatrists will always diagnose you with some kind of mental disorder to stay in business and keep you coming back.

      Look at all the new mental disorders they are coming up with no scientific medical understanding. PTSD was considered a anxiety disorder and now is a trauma disorder. The SSA recently added trauma disorder to the mental listing. The SSA also added Eating Disorder to the mental listing. An overweight person can now go to the psychiatrist and say they have an eating disorder and collect Social Security Disability.

      • I am waiting for gambling disorder to make it onto the SSA mental listing. Lol

        Gambling disorder has already made it onto the DSM-V as a compulsive disorder like OCD. I lost my house, car, and job due to the gambling addition. I can’t keep a job due to the gambling addition. Lol

      • I had a few private psychiatrist call me a fraud, but they don’t care as long as the private insurance or Medicare pays for it. I don’t even have to go “doctor shopping ” and find another psychiatrist. Many claimants go doctor shopping and don’t list the non-supportive doctors on the list of treating source for the SSA.

        They leave out non-supportive doctors which sometimes leaves big gaps in their treatment history. The SSA can’t prove that they were doctor shopping. Even if they weren’t doctor shopping, it is illegal to leave out the non-supportive doctors’ medical records.

    • The monthly-maximum Federal benefit amounts for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) in 2017 are: $735 for an eligible individual and $1,103 for an eligible couple.
      The maximum Social Security retirement benefit depends on the age you retire. For example, if you retire at full retirement age in 2017, your maximum benefit would be $2,687. However, if you retire at age 62 in 2017, your maximum benefit would be $2,153. If you retire at age 70 in 2017, your maximum benefit would be $3,538. Please visit our 2017 Fact Sheet for more important information. Thanks!

  5. I wish I could have waited as I planned to do until I reached 66, but life is never fair, as I was forced by job layoffs to retire 18 months ahead of time.
    Now that I am past the age of full retirement, I could earn money if I work without having to worry about cuts in my Social Security benefits as long as I have taxes taken out. I have taxes taken out of everything I get because even Social Security is taxable if you get more than $25,000 yearly. I just budget myself to live on a lower income.

  6. Many of the answers to the questions above are not totally complete. They are misleading. Better not to answer the questions than answer them the way you did

    • And most of the questions are incomplete due to privacy concerns. Some information is better than no information at all. Many people do not realize that this forum is not designed to answer specific questions but they go ahead and ask anyway.

    • This blog invites “thoughts”, questions, views, and shared experiences/perceptions. All blogs should be respectful, sincere, honest, and polite. The Comment Policy is available for everyones review.

    • Hi Ann. Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of September, you will receive your first benefit payment in October. Please visit Schedule of Social Security Payments for more information.

    • Hi Mike. You can try to return to work while receiving Social Security disability benefits. We have special rules to help you get back to work without jeopardizing your initial benefits. You can learn more about how work can affect your benefits by reading our publication, “Working while Disabled- How We Can Help”. Keep in mind that whether you are receiving Social Security or Supplemental Security Income, it is important to let us know promptly when you start or stop working, or if any other change occurs that could affect your benefits. For specific questions and to report changes and update your benefit records, please contact your local office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. We hope this helps.

  7. It was a bad time so I took retirement at the earliest I could….however, I sincerely wish I had stuck it out and kept working the three more years to full benefits because I am having a terrible time making it on what I get. No other money as I could not afford to save either so….really think about when you take retirement and Social Security. Especially if they steal any more of it from the fund or give it willy nilly away to every Tom, Dick and Harry that wants it, but did not pay into it at all!! They need to relock the fund and leave it locked!

  8. I just turned 62 mid August and just got laid off end of September.
    If I begin collecting now, does the $16,920 max earnings begin from the date I begin collecting SS?
    Or for the whole of 2017 Including what I already made Jan – Sept ($12,500)

    • Great question Linda. If your earnings will be over the limit for the year but you will be retired for part of the year, we have a special rule that applies to earnings for one year. The special rule lets us pay a full Social Security check for any whole month we consider you retired, regardless of your yearly earnings. To learn more, please visit our Frequently Asked Questions web page or read “How Work Affects Your Benefits”. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

      • I keep calling and getting a no one is available so I’ll post one more question. Thank you.
        With 2 jobs I definitely went over the limit of income for 2017. If I start collecting (I’m 62) December 1st, can I choose December as my (special rule you mentioned above) full pay without penalties month?
        IF yes, how do I go about doing that after I file, to also choose December for my ‘special rule’ month

  9. I just signed up for an account with social security ssi. Can I get these news articles sent to my account with social security?

  10. I am on SSDI and SSI. I turn 62 in Jan 2018. My question is, will my benefits then automatically switch to retirement benefits at age 62?
    If so, my earnings only allow just over $400 per month, according to my earnings record. I do have an x spouse who I was married to for 10 yrs, can I claim on their record at that time?
    Or will my lowly $400 be supplemented with SSI or what?
    Do I need to visit SS office?
    Am very confused and worried as there is no way I can survive on $400 a month with my medical conditions.

  11. I got my first retirement check Sept 2017 I will turn 66 Nov.6 2017
    will I have to pay anything for early retirement and I will continue to work my full time job explain to me if everything is good with that

    • Hi Barbara, if you were born between 1943 and 1954, then your full retirement age for retirement insurance benefits is 66. If you work and are full retirement age or older, you may keep all of your benefits, no matter how much you earn, starting with the month you reach your full retirement age. However, if you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, this can reduce the number of payments you receive through the year. For 2017 that limit is $16,920. If you applied and received benefits prior to attainment of full retirement age, and work part-time thereafter you will be considered “retired” only if your monthly earnings are $1,410 or less. Also, if your earnings will be over the limit for the year but you will be retired for part of the year, we have a special rule that applies to earnings for one year. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working for more information. If you have specific questions about your situation, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak with one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or contact your local Social Security office directly. Thanks!

  12. I become retired because I was Lay off, then I start to collect retire benefit at 63, now I am 66 mature age, and now I am working again if I keeping working for 48 months more after my 66 years old, even those that I was penalized with 25% deduction in my benefit, it will increase my retire benefit because I will work for 48 months more after the mature age?

    • Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase their monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically. If you continue to work, remember that starting with the month you reach full retirement age, there is no limit on how much you can earn and still receive your Social Security benefits. We hope this information helps!

  13. I am on Social Security Disability. If I sue a prospective employer for employment discrimination and future wages, then will my Social Security be offset.

    I am too lazy to work, but will this future wage earning offset my Social Security Disability. If I keep on filing out job applications, then sooner or later someone is going to discriminate against me when I ask for accommodation.

  14. I retired at 62 (early), and I started getting benefits at that time. my question is: I have two children under age (4 months and 12 years) with a woman who is not my wife. Can my children receive any benefits and how do I go about it. They were born and live in Mexico with their mother who is living with another man.

  15. After the recent hack on Equifax I suggest setting up a two-factor sign-in on at the Social Security site in order to prevent our checks from being diverted.

  16. If I receive SSI does Social Security automatically take out for Medicare Part A and Part B? I have what is called the “original medicare” I understand that this includes part A and B; however, my Medicare Card only has A on it? How may I get clarification on exactly what coverage I have??

    • Hi Linda. Generally, we automatically deduct Medicare premiums from individuals who collect Social Security benefits. Unfortunately, but for your security, we do not have access to personal information via this blog. We suggest contacting our toll free telephone number at 1-800-772-1213 and speaking to one of our representatives for specific information on your records. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later in the day, or later in the week. Thanks!

  17. I am 70 and still work full time, I draw my ssn and have insurance at my job. will I be pentalized if I sign up for medicare now while I am still working?

    • Thank you for your question Judi. Generally, if you are actively working and covered under your employer’s group health insurance program, you can delay enrollment into Medicare until you stop working or the health coverage is dropped. In these situations, the size of the employer determines whether you may be able to delay Part A and Part B without having to pay a penalty if you enroll later. We always suggest that individuals speak to their personnel office, health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future. To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.medicare.gov. We hope this information helps!

  18. I’m 62 and signed up for SS to begine in Jan.
    My job will probably last a few months into 2018. My monthly income will zero out my ss benefits. My question is, is my earnings cap based on monthly earnings or yearly?

  19. how much longer do i need to go before i am through paying my penilty off for making more then i was allowed 2 years ago

    • Hi Joseph, for security reasons, we do not have access to information about your account in this venue. In your situation, we encourage you to contact your local office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  20. I will be 65 in December after Christmas. I plan to retire end of this year. I understand I can work part time job and still get social security benefits but at age 66 will it increase? I was informed at the end of the year my SS benefits would be 93.9 at age 65. Suppose I just get SS at age 65 then at age 66 will it increase? If I don’t work nor get SS benefits but Medicare yes, then when I turn 66 how will that affect getting SS at age 66?

  21. My sister reached full retirement in March 2017. She has been drawing benefits for a couple of years, so has had her benefits reduced. Now at age 66 1/2 she is being told that the payment reduction continues because of past monies owed. I thought that the benefit owing is discontinued when reaching full retirement and that the past withholds are repaid as part of an increased benefit. True?

    • Hi, Priscilla. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. You may still be eligible to collect a higher benefit amount on your husband’s record. For specific in your case, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and speak with one of our representatives. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information. Thanks!

  22. It’s totally unfair & wrong for SS to even think they can limit people’s income once they’ve retired. No reason for it other than more gov control keeping the people down.

  23. I work just part of the year and earn less than the $16,920 max for early retirement, although my monthly pay would exceed the $1410 limit my total for the year would be under $16,920 say if I only worked 3-6 months to earn the $16,900.00
    Would that effect the monthly benefit.
    this would be the case if I only worked winter or summer months or seasonal work but stayed under the yearly max.

    • Hi David. Generally, we apply a monthly earnings limit when you retire in mid-year and have already earned more than the yearly earnings limit. This is usually the case the first year of retirement. This special rule lets us pay a full Social Security check for any whole month we consider you retired, regardless of your yearly earnings. If you continue to work, we apply the earnings test to all of your wages earned throughout the year.

  24. I have filed for early retirement under age 66,2 mo.
    My benefits may start in march of 2018
    How will any unemployment benefits, should I receive them effect my social security benefits if I am receiving them when my social security benefits start in March ? I am unsure as of this time whether I will receive the unemployment benefits or not.

  25. Good morning, I will like to make an appointment at 1250 D Buffalo Dr. About what I owe Social Security. I was paid $6,846.00 too much. I will like to know how to paid this back. My name is Vernice H. Baker, Social Security#*** – ** – **** 6365 Mount Eden Dr. 89139
    702-802-8064 :cell * 702-272-0486. Thanks

    • Hi Vernice. Unfortunately and because of security reasons we do not have access to personal records in this blog and cannot provide assistance in your case. You will need to speak with one of our representatives to resolve the overpayment issue. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday to Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. or visit your local Social Security office for further assistance.
      Just a reminder – Please be cautious about posting personal information on social media and communicating personal information via email. Thanks!

    • Hi Larry! If you cannot use the Retirement Estimator, please use one of our other benefit Calculators. Which calculator you choose depends on what you want do.
      If you are having difficulties with your personal my Social Security account, please call 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. After you hear “Briefly tell me why you are calling,” say “Help Desk” for help with a my Social Security account. Thanks.

  26. If I receive benefits at the full retirement age and continue to work, but there is no limit as to how much I can earn,then why is my SS benefits taxable? That seems unfair, hasn’t the benefits been taxed before?

    • Thank you for your comment, Virginia. Current federal law, requires everyone working in covered employment or self-employment regardless of age or eligibility for benefits to pay Social Security and Medicare taxes.
      For further income tax questions, you will need to contact the IRS. Their toll-free number is 1-800-829-1040.

  27. patrick connolly SS #2463
    I am blocked from ss site.
    Signed in with wrong p/w.
    Need help re-establishing use of site.
    Thanks
    Patrick Connolly

    • Hi Patrick, if you are having difficulties with your personal my Social Security account, please call 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. After you hear “Briefly tell me why you are calling,” say “Help Desk” for help with a my Social Security account. Thanks!

  28. I will be 69 years of age on 5/13/2018.
    I have worked past my full retirement age of 66, and have not taken benefits yet.
    I am thinking of applying for Social Security when I turn 69.
    If I apply on 1 May instead of 13 May (my birthday) will I be credited fully to age 69?
    Also, is Social Security always paid on the 1st of the month, or is it “staggered” to mid-month?
    Thank you for your time.

    • Hello Mr. Hartman, you may find our Early or Late Retirement Calculator helpful. Remember that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of May, you will receive your first benefit payment in June. When you are ready, you can complete your application for retirement benefits online. Happy planning!

  29. I plan retire at 62, born June 15, 1958, how much can I make annual working while taking early retirement penalties ? I was told in 2017 by SSI agent $17,000.00 , has that figure gone up as by our new president ? I’ll retire June to July of 2020, top 1st check to get about August 4th if retire in June .please,reply, Ken

    • Hello Kenneth. For 2018 that limit is $17,040. Please keep in mind, this amount changes every year.
      Also, you have to be 62 throughout the entire month to be eligible for a payment, which means that if you decide to retire at age 62, you will be eligible for your retirement benefits in July, and you will receive your first payment in August. See Payment Dates for more information on this topic.
      You can still work and receive your Social Security retirement benefits at the same time. However, if you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, this can reduce the number of payments you receive through the year.
      We have a special rule that applies to people who retire in the middle of the year. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working and read our publication How Works Affect Your Benefits for more information.

    • Thank you for your question, David. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance. When ready, you can apply for your benefits online. Please visit our Social Security Retirement Planner for more information.

  30. If I retire and sign up to receive Social Security am I permitted to wok part time to have something to do? If so how much am I permitted to earn so it doesn’t effect my benefits.

    • Hello Beatres! Individuals within three months of age 65 or older and not ready to start their monthly cash benefits can use our online retirement application to sign up for Medicare ONLY and apply for their retirement benefits at a later date.
      A beneficiary may refuse Medicare Part B, during his or her Initial Enrollment Period, if that beneficiary or the spouse, actively works and has coverage under a group health plan based on that employment, then he or she doesn’t need Medicare part B until the work activity ends or that health care coverage is dropped. However, we always suggest that individuals speak to their personnel office, health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future.
      To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.Medicare.gov or visit our Medicare web page for more information. Hope this helps!

  31. I am 73 and am receiving Social Security benefits. I started a 1099 job and will be paying taxes quarterly. This will include social security taxes right? If so will this increase the amount of social security benefits I receive?
    Thanks
    Courtney Corgan
    ccorgan5@cox.net

    • Thank you for your question, Courtney. Everyone working in covered employment or self-employment regardless of age or eligibility for benefits must pay Social Security taxes.
      Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement benefits, your monthly benefit amount may increase. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. We hope this helps!

  32. My wife is short. A few credits I will be. 66 April 30. Born 1952. Her 5-2-1053 will she be eligle to receive. Part of mine she retires. In July from. Teachers retirement thanks

  33. I would like to know how much are we allowed to receive on our income tax return
    If you arr on social security retirement.

    • Thank you for your question, Armand. Most people should enroll in Part A when they turn 65, even if they have health insurance from an employer. This is because most people paid Medicare taxes while they worked so they don’t pay a monthly premium for Part A.
      Generally, individuals can decline or delay enrollment into Medicare Part B, during their Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) when covered under an employer’s group health insurance coverage (current employment). However, we always suggest that individuals speak to their personnel office, health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future.
      If you are 65 or older and not ready to start your monthly cash benefits yet, you can use our online retirement application to sign up for Medicare ONLY and apply for your retirement or spouses benefits later.
      To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.Medicare.gov.

  34. I retired early and came back to work full time. What do I need to do and when to do it. I will surpass the 17000.00 this month. I have been told to take the check stub from when I go over the limit 17000.00 to an ssa office so my benefits can be stopped. Is this true? And what about reinstating such benefits in case I do not work anymore, will they be reinstated automatically?

  35. Dear Sir/Madam:

    Since birth, my left arm is smaller than my right arm and I can not lift up until now I am already 79 years old. Is there any benefit I am entitled for? Your response is greatly appreciated. I remain,

    Respectfully your,

    Flor E. Balecha

    • Thank you for your question, Flor. You cannot apply for Social Security disability if you have already reached your full retirement age, which is currently 66 and 4 months for individuals who attain age 62 in 2018.
      The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs based program that pays benefits to people with limited income and resources who are disabled, blind, or age 65 or older. To see if you’re eligible, call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
      Also, some individuals may be eligible to receive additional assistance from the state in which they live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. You can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services office.
      You can also visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) web page for more information. We hope this helps!

  36. The only information I can find here is for those who continue to work while receiving Social Security Benefits.
    My husband retired with Social Security Benefits at age 67, in 2016, his Full Retirement age is 66. He is now 69 and was offered a well paying job. A friend of his told him he had to wait until age 70 if he will earn a substantial amount….. If he takes this job, will it have any negative effect on his benefits? If he makes $100,000 in a year…then quits….will it have any effect?

  37. hello. i get 1200 a month but 50 is taken out each month because I made too much money last year.

    how much am I allowed to make each month at a job or other work?

  38. Starting 09/05/2018 I am full retirement ( 66 Year olds – was born 09/05/1952). If some the month as May, June, July, August 2018 I earn $1470.00 a month. Is this amount
    influence to my benefits( now got SSA – $990-134 for Part B= $856).
    Please reply to me by Email.
    Thanks

  39. if I am of full retirement age and receive social security and continue to work can I substitute out new work history to increase benefits?

  40. Within about 6 months ago, I began a part time job at a local hardware store making minimum wage. Will my monthly benefit increase since social security is being taken out of my check?

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