Retirement

2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age

January 6, 2017 • By

Reading Time: 2 Minutes

Last Updated: August 19, 2021

3 elderly people siting on a stoopEvery worker’s dream is to enjoy a secure retirement. Social Security is here to secure today and tomorrow. Part of that commitment is ensuring you have the most up-to-date information when you make your retirement decisions.

As the bells ring in the New Year, they also bring changes for new Social Security retirement beneficiaries. Full retirement age is 66 and two months for people born 01/02/1955 through 01/01/1956.  They are eligible to receive permanently reduced retirement benefits when they turn 62 in 2017.

Full retirement age is the age at which a person first becomes entitled to full (unreduced) retirement benefits.  It had been 65 for many years.  However, beginning with people born in 1938 that age has been gradually increasing until it reaches 67 for people born in 1960 and later.

As the full retirement age continues to increase, there are greater reductions in benefits if you claim them before you reach full retirement age.  For example, if you apply for benefits in 2017 at age 62, your monthly benefit amount will be reduced nearly 26 percent.

You can find your full retirement age, along with other important information, on our website.

Some things you must remember when you’re thinking about retirement:

  1. You may start receiving Social Security benefits as early as age 62 or as late as age 70. The longer you wait, the higher your monthly benefit will be.
  2. Your monthly benefits are reduced permanently if you start them any time before full retirement age.
  3. If you die, your retirement date can affect the payment to your surviving widow or widower.  If you started receiving retirement benefits before full retirement age, we cannot pay your surviving spouse their full retirement age benefit amount.  We base their benefit on the amount of your reduced benefits.
  4. If you elect to receive benefits before you reach full retirement age, you should understand how continuing to work  affects your benefits.

You can learn more by reading our publication, When to Start Receiving Benefits or visiting our Retirement Planner.


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About the Author

Jim Borland, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Communications

Jim Borland, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Communications

Comments

  1. Kristi B.

    The title of the article says “2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age”, but I don’t see anything in the article that is new.

    What specifically has changed?

    • AKA

      Nothing has changed. The title on the article was misleading perhaps to get people to read it or to get the folks worked up, who knows?

      • Robbie

        I hate my life but at least this makes it beerlbaa.

  2. Ann

    My husband passed in 2014 and was receiving his social security. I was receiving mine also. I went to Social Security to see if I could still draw any of his social security since I was left with a lot of unpaid bills and was told no. They said because I drew a little more than him I would not be eligible..it didn’t matter how many bills I had to pay. Is this correct or is there any way out of this?

    • AKA

      No.

      • CMF

        From my readings my understanding is that you re ceive the higher of the two amts not both. Since yours was higher, that is the amt you get. If his had been higher, then they would have switched you to his. SS was never meant to cover your full retirement, that is why people are encouraged to save for retirement.

      • BDCompton

        No what ?
        are they correct in telling her she cannot adjust her benefit amount, or no, there is nothing she can do ?

        • Lorelei

          It means that when your spouse dies, and you both were collecting SS, then you will only receive the higher amount of the two. If the husband’s SS was $1500 and the wife’s was $1000, she will then be collecting ONLY his $1500. Not both.

          • Joe

            So it is preferable for the higher earning spouse to die first. That would be me so I am screwed.

    • John B.

      You take the highest, so yours was more than his. We all have bills, so why should you get two checks from social security?

      • BDCompton

        Wow what an attitude ! I think she should be entitled to an increase in benefits, she did work and pay in to the fund. She is far more entitled than all of the people and their kids who are on SS, because they are obese.

        • Serena

          Exactly!

  3. JOE

    I am 70 1/2 and receive the maximum retirement amount. My wife is 59 . Should I die tomorrow will my wife receive my benefit being she is 59? Thanks

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for your question Joe. The earliest a widow can start receiving Social Security survivors benefits based on age will remain age 60.

    • AKA

      Only if she is disabled. A widow’s retirement age is 60 to draw from her spouse.

      • Cynthia B.

        My husband passed away two months ago at 63 (he had not started collecting SS), I have been told that I make too much money to collect benefits when I turn 60 in May. What is the amount?

  4. Monica L.

    I was born January 2, 1955 and my full retirement is age 66 and 2 months and I am currently employed full time. My question is this: my husband passed away January 22, 2016 will this change my full retirement pay?

    • Ray F.

      Hi Monica, your full retirement age for retirement benefits does not change. However, your full retirement age for survivors benefits may be a little different. Please see Full Retirement Age for Survivors.

      • areti11

        As a widow you can start collecting at the age of 50, but that will be reduced because it’s not at your full retirement age.

        • Pattie

          You can only collect Survivor Benefits at 50 IF you’re disabled. I became widowed at 47 and had to wait until my 60th birthday, because I’m not disabled. If you remarry before age 60, you’re not eligible, but if you remarry after 60 years of age and you’re collecting, you will have no reduction to your benefit.

      • Monica L.

        I did not mention that my husband was under SERS not SS so I am receiving survivor benefits from that agency. So would my benefits change since my husband is not alive and did not have SS. Thanks

        • Ray F.

          Hi Monica. Your Social Security benefit can be affected, if you worked and receive a pension based on work that is/was not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies). Social Security benefits can be reduced based on one of two provisions. Your own Social Security benefit can be reduced based on the Windfall Elimination Provision. Your spouse’s, divorced spouse’s, surviving divorced spouse’s or widow’s benefits under Social Security may be affected by the Government Pension Offset. We hope this helps.

  5. me

    they fix it to were your so old and in bad shape most people want live long enough to drawl much of it but that’s what they hoping for

    • Charles B.

      If you were to work at being more healthy like my 68 year old wife and me at 74 yeas in great condition. The whole system is set up based on the probabilities of life span in the actuarity tables.

      • George E.

        But if you saved and invested all your life as we have gov makes you take min distribute the taxes you 34%
        or as it has for us is SS just covers our income tax. and now gov talking about you being means tested. So if your smart get on welfare

        • George E.

          plus 1986 they started making you pay income tax on SS

          • gary

            Go ahead and thank the Ronald Reagan White House and the Republicans for those cuts.

        • BDCompton

          If you tax bill is 12000.00, you don’t need the SSA.

          • Bill

            And you can thank Bill Clinton and the democrat congress for raising the taxable percentage of your SS from 50% to 85%, and not indexing the income for inflation!

          • Deb

            Thank Obama for the tax on Medicare that went through with Ocare, not to mention the taxes on our investments!!

  6. specialkate099

    If you were born in 1950, your full retirement age is 66.
    That is the same year my husband was born and he is now at full retirement age and collecting.

    • Ray F.

      Full retirement age is the age at which a person may first become entitled to full or unreduced -Social Security- retirement benefits.

  7. Fahmi N.

    I am 70, but I started drawing social security before my retirement age, due to disability. Would my disability benefits count against my survivor benefits. I did not elect receiving benefits (disability) I was forced to do it???

    • Ray F.

      Please visit our “Survivors Planner: Protection You and Your Family Can Count On” for information.

    • AKA

      Disability benefits are not reduced as if you had attained full retirement age. No one forces you to receive disability.

      • Gary

        @AKA you can get forced to take SSA Disability if you have long-term disability insurance.The insurance carrier requires you to claim so that they lower the amount they have to pay to bring you up to whatever percentage of your earnings they contracted for. I am currently going through this process

    • William K.

      Natour,

      Getting disability is practically the same as if you had filed for retirement at age 66. It is basically an unreduced benefit.
      For people who file for retirement and disability at the same time – the retirement portion of the application would process first and payment would begin at a reduced rate based on the age of the applicant. If the disability were eventually allowed – the benefit would be adjusted to reflect payment for disability. The adjustment would go into effect after the date of onset and the 5 or 6 month waiting period for disability benefits.

      • Tom

        If disability did not start until AFTER retirement benefits were paid, there would be a permanent reduction applied to the disability for the months retirement was paid first. You only avoid an age reduction if the disability precedes or coincides with the start of retirement benefits. This is why you contact SSA and not rely on friends and family who may only have part of the picture.

        • Ellen.

          Born in 1951. Just recieved notice from Ssa. I have reach 66 this month. Been on disability for.16+ yrs. Notice is reducing my check by 200.00 a month…..Why?

          • Ray F.

            Hi Ellen. Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog. Please contact your local Social Security office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. for further assistance and a thorough explanation. Thanks.

          • Tiger

            Did you take your social security early before applying for disability? If so, you received the increased amount for disability when you were deemed disabled, but now that you have reached your full retirement age, your benefit is being reduced to the regualar early retirement benefit. Call Social Security and confirm.

          • Will

            I have been on disability for seven years and they say there is a new law that I have to file for retirement which negates my medical.

            I have not heard of this before but they did it over the phone yesterday, and I start my regular retirement at 65. I was born in 54, and Isn’t the new age 66.

          • Ray F.

            Hi Will. When you receive disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, we will automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, when you attain your full retirement age. The benefit amount will generally remain the same. In the other hand, if you’re receiving benefits under the Supplemental Security Income or SSI program, and become eligible for any or other Social Security benefits on your own record or the records of others (e.g., spouse’s, widow’s, or childhood disability benefits) you are required to apply for those benefits as soon as you’re eligible. To get a thorough explanation, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or you can contact your local office directly. Thanks.

  8. FunnyBunny

    Yes. There is a link in the article that will take you to the full retirement age based on year of birth.

  9. Terry

    I was born in Dec 1950 and my full retirement age is 66.

  10. Alan B.

    Is full retirement age for me, born in 1950, still 66 years and 6 months of age?

    • Edward M.

      No it’s 66 years…

      • Deborah C.

        to receive full benefits, is the age 70?

        • Deborah C.

          also, is the new “voucher” crap Trump/Republicans are working on, affect what I receive at 70 is I am 66 right now? If not, who will it affect, at what age?

          • Lel

            Hi,my name is lela i am64years old i have been working at tyler isd for 15years when will my benefits kick in?

          • Mike

            Keep your politics out of it. If it wasn’t for Slick Willy, SS would be taxed. THANKS BILL!

          • Steve

            You need to read that again, this has nothing to do with Trump. And NO you get if you are 66 you can get your full benefits now.

          • Butch

            You really should get out more and quit watching MSM. You are here asking because you will not do your own research. Therefore, you will ALWAYS be disappointed in life.

        • Ray F.

          Hi Deborah. Full retirement age is the age at which a person may first become entitled to full or unreduced retirement benefits. Visit our “Retirement Planner: Full Retirement Age” web page for more information.

          • Jenny G.

            Ray, I’ll be taking my full retirement benefits at age 66. I’m still working. Once I begin taking SS benefits, will there be any requirements on how many hours I work or how much $$ I can make?

          • Ray F.

            Great question Jenny, if you were born January 2, 1943, through January 1, 1955, then your full retirement age for retirement insurance benefits is 66. If you work and are full retirement age or older, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working and read our publication How Works Affect Your Benefits for more information.

          • tom

            it is taxed

          • Dina

            I need to apply for my full retirement benefits. I was told I can apply on line. I created “My social Security log in. But can not find a information about how to apply. Please help..

          • Ray F.

            Great! We appreciate you doing business with us online, Dina. Social Security offers an online retirement application that you can complete in as little as 15 minutes. Click here to get started. Thanks!

        • Dick K.

          After your full retirement age, if you wait to take your benefit, the monthly amount of the benefit will increase by 8% per year, up to age 70.

          • Ray F.

            If you delay your retirement benefits until after your full retirement age, you may be eligible for delayed retirement credits. The yearly rate of increase for those born in 1943 or later is 8%.. Please visit our Retirement Planner for more information

          • joe

            do you have to keep working to get the 8% increase up to 70 or can you retire at 66 stop working and wait 1 more to get the 8% increase?

          • Ann C.

            Thanks for the question, Joe. You will automatically earn Delayed Retirement Credits if you withhold receiving benefits until the age of 70. Delayed retirement credits are added for months of non-payment between full retirement age and age 70 regardless of whether or not you file at age 66.

            The yearly rate of increase for those born in 1943 or later is 8%. Please visit our Retirement Planner for more information. We hope this helps.

      • Carlos B.

        Actually, full retirement for 2017, is 66 and 2 months. It will increase by 2 months every year through 2022 at which point the full retirement age will be 70.

        • Ray F.

          Full retirement age is 66 and two months for people born 01/02/1955 through 01/01/1956. They are eligible to receive permanently reduced retirement benefits when they turn 62 in 2017. You can learn more by visiting our Retirement Planner. Thanks!

          • Athena

            I’m divorced after 20 years of marriage. I understand that my ex has gotten an early retirement at a reduced amount. If I retire at a full retirement age, am I entitled to 50% of his full retirement?

          • Ray F.

            Hi Athena, your benefit as a divorced spouse can be equal to one-half of your ex-spouse’s full retirement amount (or disability benefit) if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age. See our Retirement Planner: Benefits By Year Of Birth for more information.

    • Sharon N.

      My husband is 66 and began receiving his SS in Dec 2016. I will be 66 3-3-18, can I receive 50 % of his SS now and in the future even tho I start getting my SS?

      • Ray F.

        Hi Sharon. Your benefit as a spouse can be equal to one-half of your husband’s full retirement amount only if you start receiving those benefits at your full retirement age. Also, keep in mind that if you begin receiving benefits between age 62 and your full retirement age, the benefit amount will be permanently reduced by a percentage based on the number of months up to your full retirement age. Find more information at our “Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse.” We hope this helps.

        • judy P.

          Hi I will be 66 in Dec 2019 and my spouse is ten years younger then me will be get 50 % of his social security as well as mine when i retire?

          • Ray F.

            Hi Judy. Your benefit as a spouse could be equal to one-half of your spouse’s full retirement amount only if you start receiving those benefits at your full retirement age. However, in order for you to get benefits on his or her record, your spouse must also be receiving or be eligible to receive retirement (at age 62) or disability benefits. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse web page for more information. We hope this helps.

    • Janice J.

      I was born 1952, I will be 65 in Sept. 2017. In 1982 I was injured and totally disabled. I am drawing disability through social security. My husband passed away in 2000. He had not retired..was working when he got sick. They put him on emergency disability but he died before he was able to get the medicaid or medicare. I started drawing off of my husbands social security at age 50. I don’t think I am drawing all but am not really sure about anything. I was wondering if I will need to be 66 before I am changed over to social security with full benefits. and if I will gain in what I draw or something taken away from me. I am still disabled and will be for life. Can you give me some insight on my situation?

      • Ray F.

        Hi Janice. Generally disability benefits “change over” to retirement benefits when the beneficiary attains his or her full retirement age. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your full retirement age is 66. If a person receives widow’s or widower’s benefits, and will qualify for a retirement benefit that’s more than their survivors benefit, they can switch to their own retirement benefit as early as age 62 or as late as age 70. However, if you’re receiving benefits as a disabled widow, you are probably receiving the highest benefit amount allowed. This is because disability and survivors benefits are established at a higher rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation, and you will need to talk to a Social Security representative about the options available. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this helps!

        • Lela

          Hi,my name is lela i am64years old i have been working at tyler isd for 15years when will my benefits kick in?

        • Brian J.

          Hello Ray. My wife is disabled and receives soc security & disability (started at age 62). Due to her medical condition, the likelihood of her reaching 66 is reduced. I plan to retire in 2018 when I am 65. If she should pass after I retire – will I receive any SS benefits other than my own? Thank you.

    • Judy

      Why cant i keep my widows benefits and recieve my retirement benefits also i worked for it

      • Jenna Y.

        By law, we can only pay the highest benefit amount that a person qualifies for. Sometimes, a person may be entitled to more than one benefit at the same time and may receive a combination of benefits equaling a higher amount. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his/her own record and as a widow on another record. However, a person’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest single benefit amount to which that person is entitled. In many cases, a widow can begin receiving one benefit at a reduced rate and then, at full retirement age, switch to the other benefit at an unreduced rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation. We recommend that you contact your local office or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

    • Janet B.

      Is full benefits for SS 66 yrs old or 65 I was born 7/1952?

    • Rose M.

      Can I receive SS benefits under my husbands SS benefits when I am 62?

      • Ray F.

        Thank you for your question Rose. You may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits if you are at least 62 years of age and your spouse is receiving retirement or disability benefits. See our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information.

Comments are closed.