Our Newly Redesigned Retirement Benefits Portal

Today, I’m excited to announce the first of several steps we’re taking to improve your experience on our website. Our newly redesigned retirement benefits portal will help you prepare for and apply for retirement.

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Advance Designation: Choose a Representative Payee for Social Security to Consider Before You May Need One

The future can be uncertain. However, Social Security’s Advance Designation program can help put you in control of your benefits if a time comes when you need a representative payee to help manage your money.

Advance Designation enables you to identify up to three people, in priority order, whom you would like to serve as your potential representative payee. Continue reading

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Why Women Need to Plan Carefully to Make the Best Retirement Decisions

At the Women’s Institute for a Secure Retirement (WISER), we are often asked why we focus on women. The answer is simple.  

There are 5.8 million more women than men at age 65. Also, 67 percent of people over age 85 are female. Many individuals age 85 and over end up living in poverty after retirement. Women face greater financial long-term risks than men due to several factors:

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Coronavirus (COVID-19): Important Information about Social Security Services

All local Social Security offices will be closed to the public for in-person service starting Tuesday, March 17, 2020. This decision protects the population we serve—older Americans and people with underlying medical conditions—and our employees during the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. However, we are still able to provide critical services.

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Making Wise Choices When a Representative Payee Manages Your Money

" "Some of the millions of people who get monthly Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits need help managing this money. A person assigned to help you manage your monthly benefits is called a representative payee. We may decide you need a representative payee if we receive information that indicates you need help to manage your money. We try to select someone who knows you and wants to help you. Your representative payee should be someone who you trust, who sees you often, and who clearly understands your needs.

A representative payee receives your monthly benefits on your behalf and must use the money to pay for your current needs. Eligible costs include: Continue reading

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Educating Students About Social Security

" "In May, we celebrate Teacher Appreciation Week and honor all of the educators who are preparing students for the future. Social Security knows that a well-informed instructor is usually the best one suited to educate others. That’s why we have online resources that are easy to access and share.

Social Security’s Educator Toolkit is a rich resource for teachers and advocates. Our Information for Educators page contains information and resources to engage students and to educate them on Social Security. It includes: Continue reading

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Social Security Benefits: a Lifetime of Protections for Your Loved Ones

" "At Social Security, we know how much your loved ones mean to you—that’s why our promise of lifetime protections extends to them. When you work and pay Social Security taxes, some of your immediate family may also qualify to receive benefits on your record.

We pay benefits to: Continue reading

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Understanding Spouse’s Benefits

" "Marriage is a cultural institution that exists all over the world. Having a partner means sharing many things including a home and other property. Understanding how your future retirement might affect your spouse is important. When you’re planning for your fun and vibrant golden years, here are a few things to remember: Continue reading

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Social Security When You Are Self-Employed

man and woman cooking Most people who pay into Social Security work for an employer. Their employer deducts Social Security taxes from their paycheck, matches that contribution, sends taxes to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), and reports wages to Social Security. However, self-employed people must report their earnings and pay their Social Security taxes directly to the IRS. These taxes will help determine your eligibility for benefits later. Continue reading

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