2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age

3 elderly people siting on a stoopEvery worker’s dream is to enjoy a secure retirement. Social Security is here to secure today and tomorrow. Part of that commitment is ensuring you have the most up-to-date information when you make your retirement decisions.

As the bells ring in the New Year, they also bring changes for new Social Security retirement beneficiaries. Full retirement age is 66 and two months for people born 01/02/1955 through 01/01/1956.  They are eligible to receive permanently reduced retirement benefits when they turn 62 in 2017.

Full retirement age is the age at which a person first becomes entitled to full (unreduced) retirement benefits.  It had been 65 for many years.  However, beginning with people born in 1938 that age has been gradually increasing until it reaches 67 for people born in 1960 and later.

As the full retirement age continues to increase, there are greater reductions in benefits if you claim them before you reach full retirement age.  For example, if you apply for benefits in 2017 at age 62, your monthly benefit amount will be reduced nearly 26 percent.

You can find your full retirement age, along with other important information, on our website.

Some things you must remember when you’re thinking about retirement:

  1. You may start receiving Social Security benefits as early as age 62 or as late as age 70. The longer you wait, the higher your monthly benefit will be.
  2. Your monthly benefits are reduced permanently if you start them any time before full retirement age.
  3. If you die, your retirement date can affect the payment to your surviving widow or widower.  If you started receiving retirement benefits before full retirement age, we cannot pay your surviving spouse their full retirement age benefit amount.  We base their benefit on the amount of your reduced benefits.
  4. If you elect to receive benefits before you reach full retirement age, you should understand how continuing to work  affects your benefits.

You can learn more by reading our publication, When to Start Receiving Benefits or visiting our Retirement Planner.

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572 thoughts on “2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age

    • My husband is 66 and began receiving his SS in Dec 2016. I will be 66 3-3-18, can I receive 50 % of his SS now and in the future even tho I start getting my SS?

    • I was born 1952, I will be 65 in Sept. 2017. In 1982 I was injured and totally disabled. I am drawing disability through social security. My husband passed away in 2000. He had not retired..was working when he got sick. They put him on emergency disability but he died before he was able to get the medicaid or medicare. I started drawing off of my husbands social security at age 50. I don’t think I am drawing all but am not really sure about anything. I was wondering if I will need to be 66 before I am changed over to social security with full benefits. and if I will gain in what I draw or something taken away from me. I am still disabled and will be for life. Can you give me some insight on my situation?

      • Hi Janice. Generally disability benefits “change over” to retirement benefits when the beneficiary attains his or her full retirement age. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your full retirement age is 66. If a person receives widow’s or widower’s benefits, and will qualify for a retirement benefit that’s more than their survivors benefit, they can switch to their own retirement benefit as early as age 62 or as late as age 70. However, if you’re receiving benefits as a disabled widow, you are probably receiving the highest benefit amount allowed. This is because disability and survivors benefits are established at a higher rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation, and you will need to talk to a Social Security representative about the options available. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this helps!

        • Hello Ray. My wife is disabled and receives soc security & disability (started at age 62). Due to her medical condition, the likelihood of her reaching 66 is reduced. I plan to retire in 2018 when I am 65. If she should pass after I retire – will I receive any SS benefits other than my own? Thank you.

      • By law, we can only pay the highest benefit amount that a person qualifies for. Sometimes, a person may be entitled to more than one benefit at the same time and may receive a combination of benefits equaling a higher amount. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his/her own record and as a widow on another record. However, a person’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest single benefit amount to which that person is entitled. In many cases, a widow can begin receiving one benefit at a reduced rate and then, at full retirement age, switch to the other benefit at an unreduced rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation. We recommend that you contact your local office or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  1. I am 70, but I started drawing social security before my retirement age, due to disability. Would my disability benefits count against my survivor benefits. I did not elect receiving benefits (disability) I was forced to do it???

      • @AKA you can get forced to take SSA Disability if you have long-term disability insurance.The insurance carrier requires you to claim so that they lower the amount they have to pay to bring you up to whatever percentage of your earnings they contracted for. I am currently going through this process

    • Natour,

      Getting disability is practically the same as if you had filed for retirement at age 66. It is basically an unreduced benefit.
      For people who file for retirement and disability at the same time – the retirement portion of the application would process first and payment would begin at a reduced rate based on the age of the applicant. If the disability were eventually allowed – the benefit would be adjusted to reflect payment for disability. The adjustment would go into effect after the date of onset and the 5 or 6 month waiting period for disability benefits.

      • If disability did not start until AFTER retirement benefits were paid, there would be a permanent reduction applied to the disability for the months retirement was paid first. You only avoid an age reduction if the disability precedes or coincides with the start of retirement benefits. This is why you contact SSA and not rely on friends and family who may only have part of the picture.

        • Born in 1951. Just recieved notice from Ssa. I have reach 66 this month. Been on disability for.16+ yrs. Notice is reducing my check by 200.00 a month…..Why?

          • Hi Ellen. Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog. Please contact your local Social Security office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. for further assistance and a thorough explanation. Thanks.

          • Did you take your social security early before applying for disability? If so, you received the increased amount for disability when you were deemed disabled, but now that you have reached your full retirement age, your benefit is being reduced to the regualar early retirement benefit. Call Social Security and confirm.

          • I have been on disability for seven years and they say there is a new law that I have to file for retirement which negates my medical.

            I have not heard of this before but they did it over the phone yesterday, and I start my regular retirement at 65. I was born in 54, and Isn’t the new age 66.

          • Hi Will. When you receive disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, we will automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, when you attain your full retirement age. The benefit amount will generally remain the same. In the other hand, if you’re receiving benefits under the Supplemental Security Income or SSI program, and become eligible for any or other Social Security benefits on your own record or the records of others (e.g., spouse’s, widow’s, or childhood disability benefits) you are required to apply for those benefits as soon as you’re eligible. To get a thorough explanation, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or you can contact your local office directly. Thanks.

  2. If you were born in 1950, your full retirement age is 66.
    That is the same year my husband was born and he is now at full retirement age and collecting.

  3. they fix it to were your so old and in bad shape most people want live long enough to drawl much of it but that’s what they hoping for

    • If you were to work at being more healthy like my 68 year old wife and me at 74 yeas in great condition. The whole system is set up based on the probabilities of life span in the actuarity tables.

      • But if you saved and invested all your life as we have gov makes you take min distribute the taxes you 34%
        or as it has for us is SS just covers our income tax. and now gov talking about you being means tested. So if your smart get on welfare

  4. I was born January 2, 1955 and my full retirement is age 66 and 2 months and I am currently employed full time. My question is this: my husband passed away January 22, 2016 will this change my full retirement pay?

      • As a widow you can start collecting at the age of 50, but that will be reduced because it’s not at your full retirement age.

        • You can only collect Survivor Benefits at 50 IF you’re disabled. I became widowed at 47 and had to wait until my 60th birthday, because I’m not disabled. If you remarry before age 60, you’re not eligible, but if you remarry after 60 years of age and you’re collecting, you will have no reduction to your benefit.

      • I did not mention that my husband was under SERS not SS so I am receiving survivor benefits from that agency. So would my benefits change since my husband is not alive and did not have SS. Thanks

        • Hi Monica. Your Social Security benefit can be affected, if you worked and receive a pension based on work that is/was not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies). Social Security benefits can be reduced based on one of two provisions. Your own Social Security benefit can be reduced based on the Windfall Elimination Provision. Your spouse’s, divorced spouse’s, surviving divorced spouse’s or widow’s benefits under Social Security may be affected by the Government Pension Offset. We hope this helps.

  5. I am 70 1/2 and receive the maximum retirement amount. My wife is 59 . Should I die tomorrow will my wife receive my benefit being she is 59? Thanks

  6. My husband passed in 2014 and was receiving his social security. I was receiving mine also. I went to Social Security to see if I could still draw any of his social security since I was left with a lot of unpaid bills and was told no. They said because I drew a little more than him I would not be eligible..it didn’t matter how many bills I had to pay. Is this correct or is there any way out of this?

      • From my readings my understanding is that you re ceive the higher of the two amts not both. Since yours was higher, that is the amt you get. If his had been higher, then they would have switched you to his. SS was never meant to cover your full retirement, that is why people are encouraged to save for retirement.

        • It means that when your spouse dies, and you both were collecting SS, then you will only receive the higher amount of the two. If the husband’s SS was $1500 and the wife’s was $1000, she will then be collecting ONLY his $1500. Not both.

          • So it is preferable for the higher earning spouse to die first. That would be me so I am screwed.

    • You take the highest, so yours was more than his. We all have bills, so why should you get two checks from social security?

  7. The title of the article says “2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age”, but I don’t see anything in the article that is new.

    What specifically has changed?

      • AKA
        I believe that loophole was closed with recent legislation. Perhaps you know where to find answer on SSA website as I read it in the news (unofficial). Please let people know either way if you decide to verify. Thanks.

  8. If I collect 1/2 of my ex-husband’s SS which is much higher than mine because I was a homemaker, and then get married, will I still be able to collect on his or will I then need to revert to my much lower SS.

  9. I was born January 6 1941. II waited until my full retirement age of 65 and 8 months before receiving SS, I was told if I waited till then I could earn as much as I wanted and not be penalized. 2015 I sold two properties and paid capital gains plus my adjusted gross income was increased and my ss was reduced by 300.00.

    • healthcare and medicare costs , and your requested deductions from your benefit are the only things that should change your ssa amount. unless you owe someone.

  10. My spouse is retired civil service, he is set to draw $1,200 at 66 social security but I heard that he can only draw $200 because he is retired Civil SErvice. He is age 65 now? So confused, how does that work

  11. Given the current comments by politicians regarding curbing social security benefits –
    Are there still ice flows available for seniors?

  12. I started collecting Soc security benefits at 65 in April of last year I had a severance from my last job but it was not earned income but was pd in January 2016 when my last day was 12/31/2015 can we disregard it for reduced Soc Sec benefits
    Also is unemployment counted as income
    I did get a job in October 2016 and have been earning income so I know that will reduce my benefits
    Can I stop receiving Soc sec until I stop working or until I am 66 in September 2017?

    • My husband’s unemployment was not taxed and that is because we ELECTED for them to not take taxes out. Unemployment income is considered income and is reported to the IRS. You will pay taxes on it to the Feds when your accountant figures out your taxes. When you applied for Unempl. benefits, it specifically asked you if you wanted them to deduct taxes. Also, you cannot suspend your SS once you started to receive it. It would be nice if you could – wouldn’t we all have done that? About 7 yrs. ago you actually could stop and pay back all the SS benefits you rec’d. That has long since ceased. You can’t turn back the clock.

  13. My husband who was in US pension has passed away 3 years ago and I was too young to receive his pension, as of Janusry 1, 2017 I am now 67 am I able to apply for,his pension? Does it matter if I am still working 4 days per week? Thank you.

  14. The government not keeping the promise. when i started working the full retirement age was 65 and i plan accordingly. i want my social security and medicare taxes back with 12 percent interest from i started paying social security taxes. i do not want any retirement benefit from government.

  15. Your statement ” 3.If you die, your retirement date can affect the payment to your surviving widow or widower. If you started receiving retirement benefits before full retirement age, we cannot pay your surviving spouse their full retirement age benefit amount. We base their benefit on the amount of your reduced benefits.” Is this statement based on the surviving spouse drawing on the benefits of the deceased? My spouse hasn’t worked enough quarters to receive benefits on her own. I believe she can receive benefits and half my rate on my account. is that correct? If I pass before her does that rate go up to the benefit I was receiving at time of death?

  16. I started recieving S.S. in Dec. 2016 i will turn 62 in June of this year..Am i eligible for full or reduced benefits when i turn 62 years old ???

    • if SS means social security, then it must be disability. Your benefit will not change because you are at your full benefit level already. you don’t get both

  17. I am still working and is planning to continue to work until I am 70. I was drawing Disability but now they are saying since I am 66 (was born 11/04/1950) I am drawing full retirement. But if I keep working will my benefits go up because of still putting in for Social Security taxes which I pay 2 weeks?

  18. This all smells all wrong, you can not change the rules in the middle of the game to suit you. We all play by the same rules so let’s make some up. The cost to live on. How much does it take a man and women to live on when they both are retired 65 or ,66, let’s not get into months unless it’s 6 months, OK ! So it will be 66 and 6 months. Good number right. OK now no one who has over 900,000.00 dollars, that’s nine hundred thousand dollars in the bank will not be in the SS ring of rings . 2200.00 apiece for men and 2500.00 a month for women.. they need a little more.

  19. I AM 63 AND WILL BE 64 ON 7-8-2017 AND SSDI SAID THAT I WOULD GET MY FULL BENEFITS IN THE YEAR OF 2018 AND WHEN DO I GET MY MEDICARE, THEY ALSO SAID 1-2018, CAN YOU TELL ME IF THIS IS CORRECT. THANK YOU,

  20. born 03/23/37. I stated investing same amount as was with held from pay checks (starting in 1953 DRIP’S) I now get more in dividends Then S.S. pays, should have bought more muni’s, results now Gov. Takes a lot in taxes plus I have to pay income tax on my S.S.

  21. the dirty politicians robbed 2.6 trillion from the fund do you think its going to get paid back we should take it from there fund fair is fair

  22. Eventhough I paid $120K in taxes everybody felt i am burden on government and family. i am collecting disability. i am hearing the voices and it is toucher to me. i feel that instead of i paid ssi if government kept money in seperate account like 401 k and private disability insurance then nobody would have problem or jealous on me. i try to comitt sucide 5 times because of it. one family save me. i donot have any thoughts to harm anybody. i would have atleast $300k in my account plus i would have got more in disability benefit and health benefit. i would have never worry about loosing my benefits.

  23. I have been divorced twice, each marriage was over 10 years long. One, 23 years long. I am now single and plan on remaining so. When I am of qualifying retirement age, could I claim SS retirement benefits from either or both of my former spouses and if only one, which one…? Or does it matter, and is it contingent on when he/they apply to receive their SS retirement benefits?

  24. what money social security paid me for disability would have been cost me only $2 month in private company and i would have got more money and i paid $120k in ssi and medicare taxes. i never worry about loosing a benefit, family and listening to people jealous on me for taking a disability benefits. i would have better insurance plus money in my retirement account as well as disability money.

  25. If you didn’t work during your lifetime chances are you’ll get more in SSI than most people that have worked 35 years or more. Sad, but so true.

    • The average retirement benefit paid is $1,180.80, while SSI pays only a maximum of $735.00. In addition, SSI payments are reduced for any other income received, even gifts, while Social Security retirement benefits are not, unless you are working, under the full retirement age, and have annual earnings that exceed $16,920 this year. Also, Social Security retirement benefits can also provide benefits for auxiliary family members and eligible survivors, while SSI provides no family or survivor entitlement.

    • Or you can denounce your American citizen, go to Mexico to become a citizen, jump the border and come back, get free college, and social security.

  26. It’s all bull. I’m 66 & have to wait until the middle of the month for payment yet people collecting SSI who have never put a dime in get a check on the 1st plus food stamps etc. young people with bogus diagnosis of ailments. Speech defects, anger problems, & more nonsense. Drawing on the system. It’s easy to give away other peoples money and interest earned .

    • Sure you were told you benefit would be paid, on or near your birthday. If you know of someone involved in fraudulent activity, why do you not do you civil duty and, file a complaint with the SS office, or the US attorney.?

    • Please try to be a bit more compassionate to the unfortunate ones. Disabled people need our (including government) assistance at all times because they did not, more often than not, cause their unfortunate circumstances.

  27. OASI has a problem with bothy supply and demand in that they seem to force people over the age of 70 to receive maximum benefits although they continue to have high incomes they do not even pay OASDI taxes on and pay very little to nothing for the poor whose demand for an adequate standard of living is not insured until age 65 when they become eligible for SSI and Medicaid. Paying too much to rich people, who evade taxation by OASDI on all their income, before they actually retire or need more money to pay the bills, at age 70, is tantamount to robbing the poor who receive OASI benefits less than SSI $733 (2016). Maybe $733 (2016) should be the minimum OASDI benefit for the working rich at age 70 and the poor.

    People get drafted President at age 70 because Baby boomers are so unaccountable for child welfare, civilly, economically and politically due to tyranny of the majority and national delinquency under the Slavery Convention of 1926, with whom WWII is better than Vietnam for attempting to evade and defeat the taxes of a civilian, but Baby Boomer plagiarized generation x that threatens to take away your boom boom. Baby Boomer just can’t count higher than me, a poorer rich man than Donald Trump’s two skyscrapers filled with computer processors equals the computing capacity of the human brain (except Baby Boomers who drop pennies from the top of the building). I, a generation x disinherited homeless person, on the other hand was plagiarized for two skyscrapers and find them to be stupider than a properly used computer that I agree is much less powerful processor than the human mind traditionally expressed in writing that the computer is really good at processing. The Internet might be safer than the library these days.

    Rich people begin paying for the Medicare Ponzi scheme at age 65. Maybe they and other rich people should continue to pay after Medicare is abolished for the extortionate premiums of 2016 and 2017 and social security beneficiary health is insured for free by Medicaid, but if there is one thing the government could do to spare rich old people it is to stop robbing them with health insurance premium inflation and treat them with Medicaid like everyone who was ever ripped off by the 2.9% HI tax. Out-of-pocket medical expenses drive elder poverty up from 9% to 16%. Men who retire tend to sit on the couch until they die without someone to pay them to work = force x distance. Women, maybe because they are better cooks, and maybe because their old bones tolerate body fat and disability better than men, do much better in retirement and many retire early and spend half their life on social security, like me, a male disability beneficiary, whose ten year survival was dependent on passing the Marine Corp physical fitness test (PFT) 50-100 crunches, push-ups and 3 mile run everyday to keep Hospitals & Asylums two hundred and five year history away.

    Please use your Baby Boomer seniority in the computer age to end to the war of attrition regarding an annual 3% COLA and 3% raise in federal minimum being needed to compete with 2.7% average annual inflation by passing the Social Security Amendments of January 1, 2016-17 http://www.title24uscode.org/ss2017.htm

  28. Disability insurance benefits are paid as though the beneficiary attained full retirement age when he or she started receiving disability benefits. This benefit amount should not change over time except for cost-of-living increases, and it should not change when the benefit is automatically converted to a retirement benefit when the beneficiary attains full retirement age. If your benefits were actually reduced when your benefits were converted to retirement benefits, you should contact Social Security for an explanation.

  29. I see many comments here that seem critical of Social Security for merely carrying out the laws passed by Congress and signed by the President. If you think something about the program is unfair, such as the requirement that Social Security can only pay someone the higher of two benefits, you shouldn’t waste this resource on those complaints but send them to the responsible entity, Congress.

  30. It is amazing to me how ignorant most people are about their social security benefits in even the most basic form. This is precisely why Congress is eyeing reducing “aka modernizing” benefits for everyone to solve the funding problem. The vast majority of taxpayers are clueless. Get with it people—educate yourselves about Social Security before it is too late.

  31. The article title is -2017 Brings New Changes to Full Retirement Age. I did not read every word, but what are the changes being made in 2017?

  32. Most of the responses do not indicate if the comment is from SSA officially or an individual. If the SSA person would identify himself as such, I would have more confidence in the comment

    • Hi Judith, we have an official social media team dedicated to posting messages and responses to customer inquiries or comments that specifically address SSA issues. Please be aware that our official agency responses will always include the Social Security Administration (SSA) seal. Our blog — Social Security Matters — gives readers information about a variety of topics, including our programs, online services, current events, and human-interest stories, usually in greater detail than typically shared on our other social media platforms. Thank you for your support and for using our blog.

  33. I AGREE, WHY WOULD YOU WANT AN ANSWER THAT IS NOT FROM SOCIAL SECURITY ADMIN!!!!!! ISN’T THAT THE REASON WE ARE ON THIS SITE FOR ANSWERS??? WASTE OUR TIME!!!
    BUT THANKS TO THOSE WHO FELT IT THEIR RESPONSIBILITY TO TRY TO HELP THOSE WITH QUESTIONS, YOUR APPRECIATED

  34. I was born Jan. 3, 1947 and retired at age 66 and started collecting my social security benefits. I started working again in 2015 and have continued to do so. I had my taxes done by H&R Block this year due to my employer having me enroll in a HSA of $200, which I now understand has a new form. I was also penalized on my Social Security for making $19,455 in earnings. It was my understanding at my retirement age of 66 I could make as much as I wanted and not be penalized on my social security. I still pay into my social security which I know is required.why would 10% of my social security be taxable income.

  35. My husband is retired, 68, and collecting SS from age 65. I am 60, still working and just looked at the chart on benefits upon my retirement. Did I read it right?? It says that I, as a spouse, will have my SS reduced to 35.4%???? OR do I look at the wage earner col where it says I can collect 75.8% if I retire at 62 and 6 months??

    • Hi Karla. If you were born in 1957, at 62 + 6 months, the reductions are: 75.8% for the wage earner and 35.4% for the spouse. This chart lists age 62 reduction amounts and includes examples based on an estimated monthly benefit of $1000 at full retirement age. Click on your year of birth to find out how much your benefit will be reduced if you retire between age 62 and full retirement age. We hope this helps.

  36. How is it that – despite drawing social security retirement early since age 62 – that now in Jan 2017, my Social Security account online shows “you are not currently receiving benefits” ? What caused this?
    Naturally, the offices are closed.

    • We are sorry you are having issues with your account. Please visit our Frequently Asked Questions to read information on why you may be having trouble accessing your account. Also, we have established a dedicated MySocialSecurity Hotline. To reach this hotline, call 1-800-772-1213, and select the prompt “For help with registering or using the MySocialSecurity website”. The help desk will be available to callers between 7:00 a.m. and 12:00 a.m. (Eastern Time). You will generally have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Thanks.

  37. Instead of automatically converting from SSDI to retirement benefits at FRA, can the beneficiary suspend retirement benefits to age 70 and then get a greater monthly amount at the later age? (I asked this question in March 2016 but did not get an answer!)

    • We are sorry if we missed your question before. Please keep in mind that your disability payments are established at the highest rate possible. You may be eligible to switch from disability to retirement benefits, the rules can be complicated and you will need to speak to one of our representatives at your local Social Security office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thank you.

      • At Full Retirement Age, disability benefits end automatically and retirement benefits are paid instead. The switch is not an option, but a requirement. What I want to know is if, at that point, a former SSDI recipient can ask for suspension of benefits to age 70 and resume retirement benefits at a higher monthly amount at age 70.

        • Unfortunately, your question is a bit more complex than we can handle in this forum. For your security, we do not have access to information about your account in this venue. We recommend that you speak with one of our representatives directly. Call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. or contact your local Social Security office directly. Thanks!

  38. I will born April 27, 1951, and will be full retirement age of 66 this April 27. For SS purposes, do I reach full retirement on April 1, 2017, or not until April 27. Should I begin benefits on April 1, 2017, or May 1, 2017?

    • Thank you for your question Ben. You will attain your full retirement age, on April 1st. You can apply for your benefits online at any time now. Remember that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of April, you will receive your first benefit payment in May. Please visit our Social Security Retirement Planner for more information.

  39. I was born on 12/1957. I am entitled to retire as early as 60 years old. It is very difficult to find jobs at this age. I have survivors benefits that belongs to my husband that died about 10 years ago, but the money I was expecting is so reduced.

  40. When can I draw on my living spouses social security earnings record and let my set? We have been married for 30+ years, I will be 62 soon. I’d like to leave mine and draw on his. How does that work?

    • Thank you for your question Kay. You may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits if you are at least 62 years of age and your spouse is receiving retirement or disability benefits. Under existing law, if you are eligible for benefits both as a retired worker and as a spouse (or divorced spouse) in the first month you want your benefits to begin and are not yet full retirement age, you must apply for both benefits. You will receive the higher of the two benefits. This requirement is called “deemed filing” because when you apply for one benefit you are “deemed” to have also applied for the other. Visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information.

  41. I am 61, was married for 15 years and am now divorced for 20 years. I’m still working for the past 30 years and have my own SS. My ex husband is 63 and is collecting on his social security. Can I collect part of his SS now and wait until I am 66 to collect my own?

    • Thank you for your question Liliana. If you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are. If you file for one benefit, you will be effectively filing for all retirement or spousal benefits. Please visit our “Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced” for more information.

  42. I took early retirement of 62 and I have continued to work part-time. In February 2017 I will reach my full retirement age of 66, will my benefits increase since I have continued to work?

    • Thank you for your question Patty. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically. See our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working for more information:

  43. I am 65 years old and retired last year. My FRA is 66. My husband is 71 years old and started to receive SS benefits with delayed retirement credits at 70 years old. Will I be able to receive the full survival benefits as the amount that my husband is receiving now (with delayed retirement credits) if I apply for the benefits now based on my own work before my FRA which is next year?

  44. I’m 64 years old and started drawing SS at 62.
    I’ve kept working and now as I file my Federal Income Taxes for 2016 I see I have made $457.00 over the allowance. I made $16,177.00 in 2016. .
    What is going to happen?
    Will my monthly SS check be lowered permanently or just until I pay back 1/2 of $457.00 ?
    Thanks

    • You’re right Rob, for 2016 the earnings limit for beneficiaries under full retirement age was $15,720. We deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. We do this automatically when the earnings are posted to your earnings record. We will send you a notice, letting you know that you were overpaid and that we will withheld from the current year benefits in order to recoup any “incorrect payments” that were made. See our “Retirement Planner: How We Deduct Earnings from Benefits” for more information. You can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  45. I was born in 1937 and I am 79. I retired at 65. My monthly SSI was $1423. Last month (Jan 2017) there was a $5 increase to $1428. This month (Feb 2017) my SSI was reduced to $1054.20. Why was it reduced?

    • Hi Melva. For security reasons, we do not have access to personal records via this blog. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, representatives are available Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later in the day or later in the week. Thanks.

  46. Hello, my husband is currently receiving SSDI since january 2015 he was 55 years old when he first receive the SSDI ($1842/mo). I will be 62 years old this august 2017 and would like to apply for an early retirement. My social security online record showed $1980 at full retirement age which will be 66 and 2 months. I calculated the reduction of SS to age 62 and that will be around $1400/mo. My question is… am I going to receive this amount on top of my husband $1842 per month or my husband dissability check will be reduce? Please clarify this for me. Thanks you.

  47. I am a working Social Security Beneficiary, I am 68 years old. I am divorced claiming my own Social Security Benefit. I read on MSN news where a working senior collecting benefits at full retirement age starting year 2017 that social security (FICA) would not be taken from their payroll check and the company they work for would not be subject to the match of the FICA. Is this true and what publication is this? Thank you.

  48. I will be 62 years old in October. If I choose to collect then with the lower rate, will I receive it or an even more reduced rate because I am married and my husband collects his own social security? I thought I saw something on the 2017 new laws about this changing….

    • Hi, Barbara, if a person starts receiving retirement benefits at age 62 or any time prior to their full retirement age, their benefit amount is reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Your may still be eligible to collect reduced benefits on your husband’s record. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. To learn more about spouse’s benefits, visit our Frequently Asked Questions web page. If you have specific questions, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and speak with one of our representatives. We hope this information helps!

  49. When I retire at 66 with full benefits I will take my SS because my husband is still alive? Correct.
    He has to have passed before i could get half of his which is higher than mine. The other question is. If he does die, could I then change and get half of his benefits.

    • Hi Debbie. Your benefit as a spouse can –only- be equal to one-half of your husband’s full retirement amount, if you start receiving those benefits at your full retirement age. To qualify for spouse’s benefits, your husband must be receiving retirement or disability benefits. When you qualify for Social Security benefits on your own record, we pay that amount first. But if you also qualify for a higher amount as a spouse later on, you’ll get a combination of benefits that equals that higher amount. In the other hand, Survivors Benefits are paid at a higher rate. Please see “Benefits For You As A Spouse” and our Survivors Planner for more information.

  50. Over and over I have read questions regarding “disability”. Nowhere, has anyone specified which type(s) of disability. SS Disability only? VA Disability? Either/or? Both? Can an individual who has contributed to SSI for an entire lifetime, receive both VA service connected compensation (disability) and reduced SS retirement benefits? Even the questions on the SS Application for Retirement benefits don’t specify the policy.

    • Hi Paul. The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and the Social Security Administration (SSA) each have disability programs, and it is possible to receive disability benefits from both programs. Generally, we do not reduce your Social Security benefits because of your military benefits. To see if your VA disability benefits can be affected, please contact your local U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Thanks!

      • Thanks, Mr. Fernandez. My question, however, is in regard to regular SS retirement benefits (reduced rate i.e. early) and service connected disability compensation.

        • Hi Paul. Generally, you can get both Social Security benefits and your military retirement or disability benefits. You’ll get your full Social Security benefit based on your earnings. However, we recommend that you contact your local U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs office, to check and see, if the military (disability) benefits you receive, can be affected when you collect your Social Security benefits.

    • Hi William. If your wife gets Social Security disability, her benefit will likely stay the same. If she receives disability benefits under the Supplemental Security Income or SSI program, your retirement benefit income, may change her SSI benefit. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents if you have specific questions. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Also, visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse for additional information.

  51. Well, I have a different question on here! I am currently on a repayment plan from when I tried to retire from working when I turned 62. It didn’t work out and it was my fault for owing the money back to SS. I have been making regular payments now but I will be 66 in May. What will happen next? Will I still keep getting my checks withheld or will I start receiving them again, with my monthly payment taken out?

    • Hi Adrienne. If you were born January 2, 1943, through January 1, 1955, then your full retirement age for retirement insurance benefits is 66. If you reach full retirement age in 2017, the limit on your earnings for the months before full retirement age is $44,880. When you work and you attain your full retirement age, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. You should contact your local office as soon as possible to discuss your earnings. You may also request “partial withholding of your benefits” to repay the overpayment. Please call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, but you will generally have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week.Thanks.

  52. I will be 62 this year. My husband, who is 63, will be eligible for full retirement benefits at age 66. If I start collecting on my social security this year, will I get an increase as a spouse when he starts receiving his benefits in 3 years?

  53. Good morning. I stopped working when I turned 61. I have 30 years in of covered work and I do not intend to work again. Will I still get less if I file at 62 instead of 66 and 2 months?

    • Great question Ginny. You may start receiving Social Security retirement benefits as early as age 62, but if you decide to get benefits before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits an individual may qualify for, once they opt to start benefits at age 62 or at any time prior to their full retirement age. The longer you wait, the higher your monthly benefit will be. Generally, you will need to have 40 “credits”, or 10 years of paying Social security taxes to qualify for any type of Social Security benefit. You may find our Early or Late Retirement Calculator helpful. Happy planning!

  54. I was approved for SSDI in Jan. 2017. I will be turning 62 in May & I am wondering does my SSDI change over to SS payments. Or does it change over when I turn 66 & 2 months. Also, if it changes at age 66 does the payment change to the higher amount for full retirement or is my check now considered the full retirement amount. Thank You!

    • Great question Cathleen. If you were born in 1955, your full retirement age is 66 and 2 months. When you reach full retirement age, we will automatically convert your disability benefits (SSDI) to retirement benefits, but the amount remains the same. Disability payments are established at the highest rate possible, meaning you are getting the highest benefit amount payable, based on your earnings record. We hope this helps.

  55. Good Afternoon. I have a question concerning when I retire. If I choose to retire early at 64 instead of 66 and 2 months ( I was born in 1955) what percentage would I receive? I assume the amount is pro-rated from early retirement at 62 vs. full retirement? I stopped working last year and I no longer am paying into the system. Thank You in advance!

    • Hi, Ginny. Thanks for your question. For persons born in 1955, the approximate percentage received at age 64 is 85.6. For more information, visit our webpage: Full Retirement Age: If You Were Born in 1955. Keep in mind, reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. To get an estimate for different scenarios and ages, please consider using our Retirement Estimator. We hope this helps.

  56. I was born in Dec 51, and am a little less than a year away from full retirement at 66. Luckily I may be earning much more this year than I ever have in a single year. I have heard that benefits are based on your “best year’s earnings.” Will earning a lot in my last year raise my benefits to where they would be if I earned this large an amount in the years before?

    • Good question Eric. The amount of the Social Security benefit you receive is established at the time you apply for Retirement Benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings and your age at the time you apply. Generally, we use the highest years of earnings to calculate your monthly benefit amount. You can use our online calculator where you can test various scenarios and retirement ages to estimate your benefits. You can also create a my Social Security account to review estimates of your retirement, disability, and survivors benefits, your earnings record, and the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid. We hope this information helps.

  57. I started spousal benefits at my full retirement age (66) and will claim my own benefit when I retire at age 70. Will the years of highest earnings end at 66 for me or at age 70? Thanks.

  58. My husband is 65 and a LPR Green Card holder and will soon be a US citizen this summer. I am 59. Can my husband file for Medicare using my work history now, or do we have to wait 6 years until I turn 65? Also can he claim any of my Social Security? If so, at what age do we both have to be for him to do so?

    • Hi, Anita. Anyone aged 65 or older who does not have 40 credits and therefore not insured, will have to pay premiums for both Medicare Part A & B. Individuals can also qualify for Medicare on their spouse’s record if the spouse is insured, and age 62 or older. You must be age 62 and eligible for retirement or disability benefits in order for your husband to get spouse’s benefits. Under certain conditions, people age 65 or older, who are citizens or permanent residents of the United States, but are not insured, can buy Medicare Parts A (Hospital) and B (Medical Insurance). Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and speak with one of our agents. To learn more about Medicare, who is covered, and how to apply, check out our publication entitled, Medicare.

  59. When I submitted my application in Jan 2015, I requested my benefits start May 2015. I received a letter from SS stating my benefits would start May 2015. I had been receiving my same benefit through Oct 2016; then the SSA sent me a letter stating that I requested benefits to starry Jan 2015, which is untrue. Now SSA is reducing my benefits. I have written several letters and shown evidence to Harrisburg PA office, but I have received no satisfaction from SSA. They took away some of the money they previously issued to me. HELP!

    • We regret to hear about your situation Shelley. Unfortunately, your situation is a complex one and outside the scope of what can be handled via this forum. You can write to us and provide us with more information about your case. Thanks.

  60. The company I have worked for has closed down as of Dec 2016. Haven’t yet found work in my profession but I’m am submitting resumes for this type of employment. I’m a young and physically able 65 now and will be 66 this year. I’m drawing unemployment at this time and if I continue to draw it when I reach 66, would this affect my Social Security benefit when i apply. If I haven’t been rehired in the job market and still collecting unemployment benefit. Would this affect my situation in any way?

  61. I am 66 born 1950 so I am at full retirement age. I am also working full time and collecting my social security benefits. Is my social security counted as income and taxed?

    • Great question Terry. Everyone working in covered employment or self-employment regardless of age or eligibility for benefits must pay Social Security taxes. Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement benefits, your monthly benefit amount could increase. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. Also, some people have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. This usually happens only if you have other substantial income (such as wages, self-employment, interest, dividends and other taxable income that must be reported on your tax return) in addition to your benefits. For further income tax questions, you will need to contact the IRS. Their toll-free number is 1-800-829-1040.

  62. Is it true that before changes made in the last couple years; a spouse could collect a spouse benefit before their own retirement age? example; husband is 68 and starts collecting SS. Wife is 55 at this time and starts collecting spouse benefit.

  63. I will be 66 Jan 2018 and plan to continue working full time and draw my social security benefits. Can I also draw portion husband’s social security benefits. He is still living.

    • Thank you for your question Sue. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your full retirement age is 66. Beginning with the month you reach full retirement age, your earnings no longer reduce your benefits, no matter how much you earn. In addition to that, you can receive full retirement benefits on your own record or receive half of your husband’s. Generally, if you qualify and apply for your own retirement benefits and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay your own benefits first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own retirement benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. However, if you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, and you file for benefits at full retirement age or later, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spouse’s benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. We hope this information helps!

  64. My husband pass away at a early age. Can I received his
    spouse benefit now or do I have to wait until his 62 birthday. He was born in 1959. Also my retirement age is
    not until the age 65 0r 66 because I too was born in 1959.
    And when I start receiving my benefit will it be the full amount. And will his benefit still come to me

    • Hi Angela, if you are the widow of a person who worked long enough under Social Security, you can start receiving reduced benefits as early as age 60 (50 if disabled). Your survivor benefit amount would be based on the earnings of the person who died. You cannot apply for survivors benefits online at this time. If you need to apply for benefits, call 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778). You can speak to a Social Security representative between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. You can also contact your local Social Security office. An appointment is not required, but if you call ahead and schedule one, it may reduce the time you spend waiting to speak to someone. We hope this information helps.

  65. I want to make sure I’m filing properly for spousal benefits… my husband is 67 and filed then suspended his benefits in Nov. 2015. I will turn 66 in two months, at the end of May. My understanding is that if I ask for spousal benefits to begin at my full retirement age at that time, I can do so because my husband filed/suspended before the new rules took place in April 2016 and because my birthdate is prior to January 1954. I also understand that I will continue to receive my spousal benefit of 50% of my husband FRA benefit until age 70 or a previous date if I decide to file earlier. Is all this correct?

    • Hi, Barbara. You are correct. The new rules will not affect individuals who have already suspended their benefits before April 30, 2016. Also, since your spouse’s request was before April 30th 2016, your entitlement as a spouse after that date will not be affected by the new rules and you will receive payment. Also, since you turned 62 prior to January 2, 2016, the new law that extends deemed filing rules to benefits at full retirement age and beyond will not apply to you. For more information about these filing strategy changes and spouse’s benefits, please visit our webpage, Retirement Planner: Deemed Filing For Retirement And Spouse’s Benefits Frequently Asked Questions.

  66. Why would anyone NOT choose full retirement SS at age 66?
    Also, I have SS from a disability but will be 65 in May. Do I need to do anything or does my SS remain the same?
    Thank you

  67. (What I meant…)
    Why would someone choose NOT to sign up for full retirement SS at age 66 while they are still working full time?

    • Hi, Marilyn. Thanks for your questions. There are many factors that go into deciding when to retire. For helpful information on how retiring early or later can affect an individual’s benefits, please visit our webpage, Retirement Planner: Plan For Your Retirement. Individuals can also use our Online Retirement Estimator to get estimates of their future retirement benefits. Regarding your disability benefits; Social Security disability benefits, paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, automatically convert to retirement benefits when individuals attain their Full Retirement Age. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same. We hope this helps.

  68. I am 63. Plan to retire from my job effective September 1, 2017. I want to start receiving social security benefits after I retire, when should I apply.

    • Thank you for your question Dorothy. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance. Remember that Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your retirement benefits to begin with the month of September, you will receive your first benefit payment in October. When you are ready, you can complete the online application for your Social Security retirement benefits in as little as 15 minutes. Also, you can create a My Social Security account to review your earnings record and get an estimate of your future benefits. You can also apply in person at any Social Security office or by calling our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Happy planning!

    • Thank you for your question Richard. Keep in mind that the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, is a needs based program that gives cash assistance to disabled individuals with limited income and resources. The amount of SSI benefits is based, in part, on the income and resources available to the individual. For SSI eligibility, we will take into consideration any income and resources available to you, as the spouse. Meaning, we will take into account your income and resources when figuring out your wife’s SSI monthly benefit amount. In addition, if your wife is eligible for spouse’s benefits on your record, she is required to apply as soon as she becomes eligible. Failure to apply for additional benefits will result in suspension or termination of her SSI benefits. Please visit our web page: “Understanding Supplemental Security Income” for more information.

  69. Hello; I born in 1962 and my husband in 1956. He worked in USA but his Recent calculation for social security income is 770 at age 60. At the time of retirement my payment will be around $2000. Because his income is low can he get half of my SSI ? So it means at age 67 I get 1000 and he gets 1770?
    Could you please help me.
    Thanks;
    Jane

    • Hi Jane. Keep in mind that the earliest individuals can start receiving reduced retirement or spouse’s benefits is age 62. Also, the spouse’s benefit your husband can receive on your record can be one-half of your full retirement amount, ONLY if he applies at his full retirement age. If he was born in 1956, his full retirement age is 66 and 4 months. Furthermore, if your husband qualifies on his own record, we will pay that amount first. If he –later- becomes eligible for a higher benefit amount on your record, he will get an additional amount on your record, so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount. By the way if you were born in 1960 or later, your full retirement age is 67. We hope this information provides some clarity. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse web page for more information.

  70. I will born April 30, 1951, and will be full retirement age of 66 this April 30. For SS purposes, do I reach full retirement on April 1, 2017, or not until April 30. Should I begin benefits on April 1, 2017, or May 1, 2017? If I apply for benefits now, will it revert to the benefits payable at 62 or will I get the benefits for FRA of 66?

    • Great questions! If your full retirement age is 66 and you turn 66 on April 30, 2017 you will attain your full retirement age on April 1, 2017. You need to make a decision about when to apply for benefits based on your individual and family circumstances. Keep in mind each person’s situation is different. For information about what you should consider please visit our Retirement Planner webpage. For more information about when to start your retirement benefits, visit our helpful Fact Sheet “When To Start Receiving Retirement Benefits.”

      We pay benefits in the month following the month they are due. So if you begin your benefits in April 1, 2017, you would receive your first check on May 1, 2017. Congratulations on your upcoming retirement!

      • Thank you. One more question. Since I am working until I retire in January 2018 and I reach FRA in April 2017, will there be a deduction from my benefits for January – March 2017? And since there is no limit beginning April 1, 2017 when I reach FRA, do I still need to add my SS benefits to my income when I file 2017 taxes?
        Thank you

    • Thank you for your question, Michael. Work credits never expire. Your work credits stay on your record when you stop working and paying Social Security taxes. If you return to work later on, you can add more credits to your record. Thanks!

  71. I will be full retirement age of 66 in November. I plan to continue working full time. My question is can I draw my social security then and when I reach 70 can I switch to my ex spouse at 100% since I was married more than 10 years?

  72. I will be FRA 66 in August 2018. Everything I’ve read says I can file and collect my SS benefit in January 2018 with only the excess over approx. $44,000 (2017 exclusion amount) deducted at the 1 for 3 rate. Am I reading the SS documents correctly? I’m expecting to be able collect my SS 7 months early at a slightly reduced rate.

  73. Since I am working until I retire in January 2018 and I reach FRA in April 2017, will there be a deduction from my benefits for January – March 2017? And since there is no limit beginning April 1, 2017 when I reach FRA, do I still need to add my SS benefits to my income when I file 2017 taxes?
    Thank you

    • Hi, Frances. When you apply for retirement and continue working, your earnings may affect the amount you receive. Check out our publication, How Work Affects Your Benefits, for more information. Also, you will have to pay Federal taxes on your Social Security benefits if you file a Federal tax return as an individual and your total income is more than $25,000. If you file a joint return, you will have to pay taxes if you and your spouse have a total income of more than $32,000. You may also find our Frequently Asked Questions useful. Thanks!

  74. I began collecting Social Security Disability in 2010, at the age of 49. I had been widowed one year before in 2009. My late husband was 48 when he died. I collect both survivors benefits and disability. My survivor benefit is the higher of the two, as my late husband was the bigger earner. When I reach full retirement age (66? 67?) it is my understanding that the disability “converts” to retirement benefit. It is also my understanding that I will no longer be entitled to collect both, but that I can collect the higher of the two. Is this correct? And, if so, does the conversion to the retirement benefit, using the HIGHER of the two benefits occur automatically or will I need to inform SSA of my preference regarding which benefit I will collect?

  75. I am disabled right now and have been since 2009.i will turn 66 on may 12 2017 .i was born 5-12-1951- SSA will switch me from disabled to retired will i get full or reduced benifits? Also is it true that at retirement i will get 2360 per month as i am married and my wife is disabled and she is no where near retirement age as she is 36. I seen that mr Trump will increase married couples to 2360 per month.true or not.

  76. I just received a letter stating that since I have reached full retirement age now and will no longer be entitled to disability benefits, that I have been drawing for 8 years and will now start drawing retirement benefits. The amount they are saying I will receive each month is the same amount I have been drawing after they take out for my Medicare and Prescription Insurance Plan. Will these two deductions already be taken out before I receive that amount?

    • Hi Vickie. That’s right, for those individuals receiving disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, we automatically convert their disability benefits to retirement benefits when they attain their Full Retirement Age. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same. We will continue to make deductions for Medicare Part B premiums. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 if you have additional questions. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  77. My spouse , 68 years old , not eligible for Medicare part A on his work credit . I am eligible & have full credits .I am turning 62 this June . Will my spouse get Medicare part A ( premium free) in June without me starting my benefits ??i want to wait till full retirement age .

    • Thank you for your question Sol. A person age 65 or older who is not insured, but married to an insured individual, could qualify for Medicare on his or her spouse’s record, when their spouse attains age 62. Keep in mind that there may be other requirements to qualify for Medicare. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for specific questions about your husband’s situation. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  78. My wife starting taking 1/2 of my SS monthly payment when she turned 66. I know that ended in May of 2016. She is still working but planning to quit at 68. If she waits until she is 70 to take her SS will it increase those last two years she doesn’t work? Also, how could we find out what she could get at 68 if she discontinued taking my 1/2 and took her allowed SS payment?

  79. My spouse will turn 62 in August, if she applies for Social Security, I know that her benefit will be reduced by appox 26%. However, will there be deductions for Medicare (Part B, etc) at this point or will those deductions start when she turns age 65 and officially signs up for Medicare?

    • Thank you for your question Robert. Medicare is our country’s health insurance program for people age 65 or older. Individuals receiving Social Security benefits, and becoming eligible for Medicare, will be automatically enrolled in Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medical Insurance). Part B premiums will be automatically deducted from their benefit payment. We hope this information helps!

  80. If my spouse begins to collect before his FRA and I die, is he still entitled to collect on my benefits (I have the higher amount). Are there any limits? In other words, would he have to wait until his FRA to begin collecting mine (as mine is higher).

  81. I am two years older than my husband. If he waits until 70 to take his Social Security benefits, will I get that amount each month if I survive him and he dies sometime after age 70?

    • Thank you for your question Rosanne. Generally, a widow or a surviving divorced spouse can receive 100 percent of the worker’s basic benefit amount, when she attains her full retirement age. The maximum survivors benefit is limited to what they would receive if they were still alive. To see examples of the benefits that survivors may receive check out our Survivors Planner: How Much Would Your Benefit Be?

  82. Asking questions for my mother. She retired early at 62. She will be 65 in August. She is receiving reduced social security now. When she turns 65, will she automatically receive full social security? Does she have to fill out any forms?

    • Thank you for your question Diana. You can retire at any time between age 62 and full retirement age. However, if you start benefits early, your benefits are reduced a fraction of a percent for each month before your full retirement age . The reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits an individual may qualify for once they opt to start benefits at age 62 or at any time prior to their full retirement age. A beneficiary’s monthly benefit amount could increase, if he or she continues to work. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase their monthly benefits. The other way your monthly benefit amount could increase is based on the Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA), which is announced each year in October. We hope this information helps.

  83. I retired on January 31, 2017. I am receiving a monthly vacation pay until July. I will turn 65 in August. Does the vacation pay count as income? If not, will I still receive more social security payment if I wait until 65 to start my SSI or should I go ahead and start now? Thank you

    • Thanks for your question Diane. After you retire, you may receive “special payments” for work you did before you started getting Social Security benefits. Usually, those payments will not affect your Social Security benefit if they are for work done before you retired. Please bear in mind that the decision on when to apply for benefits is a personal one. We can only provide you with the information to help you make the best choice according to your own situation. You can retire at any time between age 62 and full retirement age. However, if you start benefits early, your benefits are reduced a fraction of a percent for each month before your full retirement age. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits an individual may qualify for once they opt to start benefits at any time prior to their full retirement age. To help you plan, you can estimate the amount of your own benefit using our online calculators. You can also create a my Social Security account to verify your earnings, and get a copy of your Social Security Statement. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance. Remember that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of August, you will receive your first benefit payment in September. When ready, you can apply online. If you need further assistance call our toll free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and ask to speak with one of our representatives, who are available Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this information helps!

  84. J Culver on March 22, 2017 at 3:40 pm said:

    I will be my FRA of 66 in August 2018. Everything I’ve read on SS.GOV says I can file and collect my SS benefit in January 2018 with only the excess over $44,880 (2017 exclusion amount) deducted at the 1 for 3 rate. Am I reading the SS documents correctly? I’m thinking I can collect my SS beginning in January at a slightly reduced rate from what I would collect if I wait until August 2018. Yes, this is the second time I posted this question. I didn’t get an answer the first time. Thank you in advance.

    • Hello Mr. Culver, our apologies if we missed your question before. Click here to look at a couple of examples similar to your situation. Thanks!

      • Thank you, Ray. I am aware and have copies of your link examples and that is what piqued my question. Your response confirms my supposition. I will be able to collect my SS at a slightly reduced rate in January 2018 and have $44,880 excluded from the $1 deduction for every $3 earned until the month I turn FRA, August 2018.

  85. My husband is entitled to SS but also has a pension coming from working in a City job. Does the Windfall provision reduce his SS benefits, even if he puts off receiving it? If he put off receiving the pension until age 70, could he receive SS benefits between 66 and 70 at the full rate? Or does the fact that he is entitled to a pension mean the Windfall Provision is in effect?

    • Hi Miriam. Generally, the Windfall Elimination Provision or WEP is not applied until the claimant starts receiving both benefits concurrently. The rules can be complicated and vary depending on the situation. We recommend that your husband contact the local office or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  86. Hi, I’m Nancy I’m 63 yo I’m now receiving SSD my husband who is 50 and still employed, am I able to receive his SS. When and would it affect his amount down the road? Thanks.

  87. Thanks for answering my question .I am sending question again . My husband 68 years old , fulfills all other criteria for Medicare except , he doesn’t not have full credits for Medicare . Based on my credits( I have full ) he is eligible , when I turn 62 .
    I was told that he will get Medicare ( premium free part A, he has Medicare part B – self pay) , only if I start my benefits at 62 . is it true ??
    Do I have to start getting my benefits to get him Medicare ??
    I do not want him to get other benefits this time ,only Medicare .
    Thanks .

    • Hi Sol. A person age 65 or older who is not insured, but married to an insured individual, could qualify for Medicare on his or her spouse’s record, when their spouse attains age 62. Neither the worker nor the spouse need to establish entitlement to monthly benefits for this provision to apply. See our Program Operations Manual System (POMS). Thanks!

  88. born in oct 55 if I take ss at 26% reduction at62 and have retirement penion and dividens is this counted as working income for more reductions

  89. My late husband was on SSD when he died. I was born in 1953 and am still working. Can I receive his benefits at age 66, then switch to mine (which will be higher) when I quit working at age 70?

    • Hi Teri, a widow can start receiving reduced benefits as early as age 60 (age 50 if disabled). In many cases, a widow can begin receiving one benefit at a reduced rate (as early as 60 years old) and then, at full retirement age (or later), switch to the other benefit at an unreduced rate. Click here to get additional information about Widow’s Benefits. We hope this helps!

  90. I don’t feel it’s right whoever changed it from being 62. This right that they feel we are all living longer is very unfair. We worked all our lives, only to be told it’s no longer 62 anymore, we have to work longer in a society that doesn’t want to hire you if you get layed off at 60. The government borrowed from our social security and never paid it back. What politician had the right to change this. We should ALL be able to retire at our full benefits at 62, this is wrong and I’m outraged by it. I don’t feel well under normal circumstances I would only have 6 more years to go, now I have 12. Just not right!

  91. I retired on January 31 and will be turning 65 in August. Will I receive more Social Security if I wait until 65 even though I not working now?

    • Diane, see my question and the IRS response above. I’m still working and will for several more years but I also turn 65 this August. Your short answer is – Yes, you will receive more SS benefits the longer you wait until age 70.

      • J Culver, do you happen to know what the difference will be as far as percentage if I wait until 65 to draw my SS benefits since I am not working. I’m wondering if it would make a big difference or would to better to go ahead and start my SS?

        • Borrowing a phrase from the SS folks, it depends. The short answer is yes, you will collect more monthly benefits if you wait until age 65. In fact, each month you wait, you’ll receive a bit more. If you have requested a SS Annual Benefits report, you’ll see exactly what you’d receive at age 62 and at FRA. There is a percentage factor applied if you apply early but I don’t have that right at hand. In my case, I intend to file and collect benefits in Jan 2018. I will turn my FRA of 66 in August 2018. I’m expecting my monthly check to be about 2-3% less had I waited until August. The good thing is that up to 44,880 in income is excluded in the year you turn your FRA (2017 amount). After that income amount, the income earned up to the month you turn FRA results in a SS deduction of $1 for every $3 you earn. Once you hit your FRA, you can make as much as you want with no SS monthly deduction.
          SS people, I hope I haven’t stepped on your toes. I provided no guidance and only spoke of my intentions and plans.

          • We appreciate your participation and thank you for your comment. Our Retirement Estimator provides accurate estimates of your retirement benefit at different ages by accessing your earnings record through a secure interface. The best way to start planning for your future is by creating a my Social Security account online. With my Social Security, you can verify your earnings, get your Social Security Statement, and much more – all from the comfort of your home or office. We have a variety of calculators to help individuals plan for the future. Which calculator you choose depends on what you want to do. We hope this helps!

    • Hi Diane, the benefit amount that you’ll receive, is established at the time you apply for retirement benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings, and your age at the time you applied. Your monthly retirement benefit will be higher if you delay starting it. Our Retirement Estimator gives estimates based on your actual Social Security earnings record. In your case you may need to use our Early or Late Retirement Calculator. Thanks!

      • Ray,
        I decided to wait until I reach 65 in August to start my SS. I am now receiving vacation pay which I understand does not count as wages. I had heard that if you list the month you want to start your SS, you payment would not start until the next month. My vacation pay will end in July and I need to SS to start in August. I just wanted to verify this. Thanks,

  92. Can couples (both DOB before 1954) both claim spousal benefit respectively at age 62, and delay their own benefits to get delayed credit later?

    • Hi Ryan. If you and your spouse turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at full retirement age or later. This means that you may file for either your spouse’s benefit or your retirement benefit without being required or “deemed” to file for the other benefit. In this case, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spousal benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. However, if you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are. We hope this helps.

      • Thanks for replying, but you didn’t answer my question. My question was whether BOTH husband AND wife could claim spousal benefits respectively at the same time, and delay each of their own benefits to earned delayed credits.

        • Hi again Ryan. A person entitled to spouse’s benefits and another benefit (own retirement, disability) does not receive both benefits. Keep in mind that to be eligible for spouse’s retirement benefits, you must be at least 62 years of age and your spouse must be receiving retirement or disability benefits. Generally, if you qualify for benefits on your own record, we will pay that amount first. If the benefit on your spouse’s record is higher, you’ll get an additional amount on your spouse’s record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount.
          *Under current law, the option to restrict an application extends only to individuals who have attained their full retirement age (currently 66). This option allows couples to start receiving spousal benefits at full retirement age, while letting their own retirement benefit accrue delayed retirement credits. *If you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement benefit and for any benefits you are due as a spouse.
          Sometimes, a person may be eligible to more than one benefit at the same time. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his or her own record and as a spouse on another record. However, a person’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest single benefit amount to which that person is entitled. We hope this provides some clarity. Thanks!

          • Thanks for providing good information but my question still hasn’t been answered. Let me rephrase: all other conditions met, can both spouses use restricted applications and receive spousal benefits on each other’s record at the same time (and delay their own benefits to earn delayed retirement credit)? This is a “Yes” or “No” question.

          • Hi Ryan — sorry for the delay in providing a response to your questions. We wanted to verify our policy and provide you with the correct information. First, the primary entitlement requirement to qualify for “spouse’s benefits”, is that the claimant must be the spouse of a wage earner entitled to (or currently receiving) retirement or disability benefits. Also, under the new law, if you (voluntarily) suspend benefit payments at your full retirement age in order to earn higher benefits for delaying, other benefits payable on your record, such as benefits to your spouse, are also suspended. And, if you have suspended your benefits, you cannot continue receiving other benefits (such as spousal benefits) on another person’s record. As you can see, it isn’t possible for both spouses to file and suspend or to restrict their applications and receive benefits on each other’s record. We hope this provides clarity.

  93. I was born in 1947 and have been collecting social security on my ex husband’s SS. I am turning 70 in 2 month and want to switch to my own SS. What do I need to do?

  94. My husband had gone to the SS office to ask about his benefits awhile back because he had worked for about 20 years using his SS. Then he worked 20 years with a school district. And now they tell him he does not qualify because he was a government employee!! So what happen to his SS that was deducted for all those other years?

    • Hi Elsa. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies, such as police officers and some teachers) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Your benefits can be reduced based on one of two provisions. Your own Social Security benefit can be reduced based on the Windfall Elimination Provision. Your spouse’s, divorced spouse’s, surviving divorced spouse’s or widow’s benefits under Social Security may be affected by the Government Pension Offset.

  95. I am currently 62, I plan to continue work until 70+. My question is if I start to take my full SS benefit at 66 plus 2 months old (FRA) and continue work at the same time, will the amount of benefit be adjusted +/- based on the average salary of last 3 years prior to my age at 70?

  96. You didn’t mention that SS benefits are predicated on how much you paid in over your working years. It has to be a certain percent or you do not get a dime no matter how old you get unless you are single and disabled. I’m 63 and do not qualify for SS because I remarried a man 4 years younger than myself 2 years after my husband died. I cannot even get my late husbands SS because I remarried. He died at age 48 when I was 47 and did not qualify then because I was too young. I would have had to remain single until I’m 60! My late husband, whom Ive loved since I was 11 years old, always thought his SS would help me when he got terminal cancer. He had been paying in since he was a teen, always worked full time and was a Military Veteran. he had no children of his own and I was his only family. I being only a housewife couldn’t even rate what he paid in because of all the catch 22’s ..

  97. My wife is about to turn 62 years old. Can she start receiving her reduced benefit that “she” earned and then… when I retire at age 66 plus (in a few years) start receiving the spousal benefit based on my earnings which will be higher than her earned benefit in lieu of her earned benefit.

    • Hi Bryan. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Your wife may still be eligible to collect reduced benefits on your record when you apply. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse for more information. Thanks!

  98. Don’t you think that is cruel or worse then cruelity to make people work untill they are 66 or 67 before they can get full retirement checks? I believe it is very cruel. After all when a person is 66 or 67 they only have a few years untill they are 70. And 70 is old. So people are supposed to work untill they are that old have little good life time left? Also my father worked hard, too hard, all his adult life in warehouses. In 1986 at about age 56 or 57 he had two heart attacks I believe from working too hard. He told me when he applied, I don’t if for social security disability or which that he was turned down and had to take it to court to get it, checks. This makes me angry at Social Security to this day. Some years ago one of my brothers about age 50 or 52 or so back then who had hardly ever got a thing from the government , he came down with a serious life threatening illness, bloodclots in his legs, around his lungs, even a bloodclot in his eye, and I dont know where all else. He was in and out of hospitals, untill I think reason he is still alive I prayed him alive and to live years. If you dont know this is a serious life threatening illness. In 2002 my boyfriend 41, allmost 42 , died from bloodclots. I couldnt believe it when my brother applied for social security disability or whatever my mother said he got turned down. He had to wait for some time to get disability. I’m not sure if a year or two years. This is just unbevelievable government would do this to Americans and get away with it. So explain this to me. Let’s hear government lame excuses for it.

    • I’ve read this post several times. Linda, this site is for questions about Social Security, not a site for endless complaints. I suggest you write to your congress man or woman. Better yet, take better care of your health, get a better education for a better job, and put your own money away for retirement. SS was never meant to support you when you stopped working. The Social in Social Security does not mean Socialism where the government takes care of you cradle to grave.

  99. My wife is sadly terminally ill and receiving SSDI payments at age 59. I am currently 62. Can I delay spousal benefits until I reach full retirement age at 66 and 2 months and then take spousal benefits until I reach 70 then take my own which would be significantly higher?

  100. I live in a household with an adult dtr receiving SSD plus a husband who starting collecting at age 63…is it true that there is a household limit on SS benefits?

    • Hi Paula, you may be getting our programs confused. Retirement benefits and disability benefits paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance program or SSDI, are based on your prior earnings and are not subject to income and resource limits. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, in the other hand, pays benefits to people with limited income and resources who are disabled, blind, or age 65 or older. There are times when SSI benefit determinations are affected by a person’s living arrangement and the total household income. We hope this helps!

  101. I took early retirement at 62 and I am now 70 and I was wondering if I can change to full retirement status. If so would my benefits change

    • Thank you for your question Mary. When a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. Unfortunately, these reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits an individual may qualify for.

  102. I took early social security at age 62, when my FRA WAS 66. . I am now about to turn 71. I know that my benefits are permanently reduced.
    My ex husband, alive and working, is turning 66 in two months, July 2017, which is his FRA. I do not know if he will decide to start receiving benefits then, but I can I now, switch to receiving benefits based on my ex’s FRA, assuming that they are higher than my own benefits??. When I started receiving benefits at 62, we were already divorced, but he was 57. Is it too late for me to request ex-spousal benefits??? ?? I understand that the amount also would be reduced due to my opting to receive early benefits at 62. Also, if it is not too late to switch, would his 50% benefits be reduced by the same percentage as my payments on my own record??
    But can I switch now, or is it too late to request that option????

    • Hi Judy. If your ex-spouse does not apply for retirement benefits, but can qualify for them (at his age 62 or later), you can receive benefits on his record, if you have been divorced for at least two years. You’re right, if a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. These reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits in which an individual may qualify for. This would include benefits you may receive as a divorced spouse. To see if you’re eligible for a higher benefit amount, you will have to speak to one of our representatives. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or contact your local Social Security office directly.

  103. Hi: I am 60 years old will be 61 in June. I am trying to figure out can I collect SS under my husband even if I have enough credits to collect on my own as I have not worked much and men will be very little as I stayed home taking care of children but I do have enough credits to collect on my own but his is so much more then mine. I will start collecting in June 2018. Hope you can help me. Barb

    • Thank you for your question Barbara. If you do have enough credits to qualify for your own Social Security benefits and you apply for your own retirement benefits and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay your own benefits first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own retirement benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. Click here to see an example. Also, visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information.

  104. I am 48. My ex husband died over a year ago. We were married more than 10 years. Is there any way I can start collecting SS survivor benefits now?

  105. I was born 1952 so when I turn 66 I can start collecting SS. My husband is 72 and collects his full amount which is more than mine would be. Do I get his amount and let mine earn more by age 70? Do I apply for the spousal amount as the new law affects those born 1954 and after? Is that correct?
    Thank you

  106. I will turn 66 in July 13th. I plan to file/suspend- restrict my application to Spousal benefits ( until I turn 70; spouse filed and suspended to accrue the special credits until he is 70 next year.) So I don’t mess myself up do I need to wait until July or my actual birthdate to apply; or can I do it now but request benefits begin when I reach FRA?

    • Hi Murphy, and thank you for your question. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance, you can apply for your benefits online at any time now. Remember that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of July, you will receive your first benefit payment in August. If you need further assistance call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and ask to speak with one of our representatives. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this helps!

  107. Can I collect my social security benefits if I’m already collecting my deceased husbands benefits. I’m 70 years old.

    • Hi Bev. In many cases, a widow can begin receiving one benefit at a reduced rate and then, at full retirement age (or later), switch to the other benefit at an unreduced rate. This assuming that she is eligible for retirement benefits and that her retirement benefit rate is higher than the rate as a widow. You will need to contact your local office, or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213, for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  108. What are the changes for using spousal benefits and delaying your own benefits to a future time? Does the spouse have to be actually retired or just at full retirement age?

  109. I was born in 1954. I’m 63 years old. My husband will be 66 this Feb. If I take my SS now at it’s reduced amount, can I upgrade to what “half” of my husband’s is once I hit my full retirement age at 66? Or is I take it now will I be forever stuck with my reduced amount? My full amount if I wait will be 700.00 per month. Half of my husbands for me would be 900.00 per month. Right now my SS would only be around 475.00 per month. Lastly no matter what I end up doing…if heaven forbid my husband passes before me will I still get ALL of his social security? Help!

    • Hi Michelle. The benefit you can receive as a spouse, can only be equal to one-half of your husband’s full retirement amount, if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age. If a person begins to receive Social Security benefits prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. These reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Generally, survivor’s benefits are paid at a higher rate. However, the monthly amount you would get is a percentage of the deceased’s basic Social Security benefit. Please visit our Survivors Planner for more information. We hope this information helps.

  110. I won’t reach full retirement age until 2033 and have a full-time job that I intend to work at until then. My husband doesn’t work at all and will be 62 in 2023. My thought is to have him start receiving early retirement, even though it will be a reduced amount, so that it will supplement my income and we can pay down or pay off any remaining debt. Is this sound thinking? Are there other considerations I should be aware of?

    • Hi Susan. Current law provides, that if your husband never worked under Social Security and is not ensured on his own work record, he may be able to get spouse’s benefits on your record (at age 62), if you are receiving retirement or disability benefits. See our “Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse” for more information.

  111. My spouse is eligible for Medicare premium free part A , based on my work . I turn 62 this month . When should he apply for Medicare A – premium free ?
    What form should we use if we want to apply online ?
    Thanks

    • Thank you for your question Sol. Individuals should sign up for Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) 3 months before their 65th birthday. However, in his case, there may be restrictions to apply online, and the system may not accept uninsured Medicare-only claims. If your husband cannot apply online or decides not to finish applying online, for whatever reason, he can apply in person at any Social Security office or by calling our toll-free number, 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

  112. I started collecting from my ex-husband’s last year on my 66th birthday. I still work and my annual income is $24k. Is my SS being reduced during this time? I ‘d like to work until 70 y/o, but not be penalized.

    • Hi Maureen. Based on the information you provide, it seems that you started to collect benefits when you reached your full retirement age. (If You Were Born Between 1943 And 1954, your full retirement age is 66). Beginning with the month you reach full retirement age, your earnings no longer reduce your benefits, no matter how much you earn. Also, when you continue to work, there is a chance that your monthly benefit amount increases. Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. Visit our Retirement Planner: “Getting Benefits While Working” for more information.

  113. I was born in 1955 and turn 62 on July 17th of this year. I want to retire and stop working in August. I understand that there is a limit on how much you can make in a year after which .50 is taken for every dollar over the limit. Do my wages from January of this year through August count towards that limit, or is it just wages earned from August through the end of the year?

    • Hi Rene. In 2017, the annual earnings limit is for individuals under full retirement age is $16,920. If your earnings will be over the limit for the year but you will be retired for part of the year, we have a special rule that applies to earnings for that one year. We will not count your wages from January through August. Also, to clarify, if you work, and are younger than full retirement age, we must deduct $1 from your benefits for each $2 you earn above the yearly limit. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working and read our publication How Works Affect Your Benefits for more information. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance. When you are ready, you can complete the online application for your Social Security retirement benefits in as little as 15 minutes. Also, you can create a My Social Security account to review your earnings record and get an estimate of your future benefits. Happy planning, and congratulations on your retirement!

    • Hi, Pepe. Thanks for your question. If you choose to get retirement benefits at age 62 or before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. These reduction factors are permanent. Unexpected changes may occur after you apply to start your Social Security retirement benefits. You could change your mind, and you may be able to withdraw your Social Security claim and re-apply at a future date. However, you must do this within 12 months of your original retirement date. See our Frequently Asked Questions web page for information on this topic.

  114. I am 72 years old, I started working 5 years ago, I had been paying SS during 5 years. Can I apply for my retirement now and what % of my salary could I receive ?

    • Thank you for your question Alesandra. Generally, you will need to have 40 “credits”, or 10 years of paying Social security taxes to qualify for any type of Social Security benefit. If you do not have enough credits to be eligible for Social Security benefits, you may be eligible for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits. The SSI program pays benefits to people with limited income and resources, who are disabled, blind or age 65 or older. Please call our toll-free number 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Generally you’ll have a shorter wait-time if you call later during the week. Or contact your local Social Security office directly.

  115. My husband is receiving SSDI $2100 monthly and hasn’t worked since year 2002. Will his benefit amount change at age 66 to a lower amount since SSA goes by the last will the $2100 monthly not change at age 66? Will the SSDI of $2100 roll over to SSA $2100 monthly?

    • Hi Brenda. Social Security disability benefits automatically change to retirement benefits when disability beneficiaries attain their full retirement age. Benefits are not interrupted with this transition and the benefit amount will generally remain the same. Thanks!

  116. Concerning reduced benefits if you continue working while receiving early Social Security. Do these reduced benefits go away once you reach full retirement, or do they limit income or benefits for the life of Social Security? I was told that the only way you are able to make unrestricted income is to wait until full retirement age.

    • Good questions Greg. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. However, if you continue working while you receive Social Security retirement benefits, you could get a higher benefit in the future. We will check your record every year to see whether the additional earnings will increase your monthly benefit. In addition, after you reach your full retirement age, we will recalculate your benefit amount to give you credit for any months in which you did not receive a benefit because of your earnings. If you’re still working when you attain your full retirement age, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. Please read our publication “How Work Affects Your Benefits” for more information. We hope this provides some clarity. Thanks!

  117. I need to cover the gap between my 65th birthday 7-30-53 and my first SS check Sept 26, 2018. Can I earn my normal wage the year I retire for August and September, or will I be penalized? My FRA is 66.

    • Thank you for your question Rick. If you apply for benefits at age 65, and you continue to work , you will be considered “retired” in any month that your earn less than the allowable -monthly- amount for that year. For example in 2017, a person younger than full retirement age for the entire year is considered retired if monthly earnings are $1,410 or less. Also, if your earnings will be over the limit for the year but you will be retired for part of the year, we have a special rule that applies to earnings for one year. The special rule lets us pay a full Social Security check for any whole month we consider you retired, regardless of your yearly earnings. To learn more, please visit “How We Deduct Earnings From Benefits” or read our publication: “How Work Affects Your Benefits”. We hope this information helps. If you have additional questions, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, and speak with one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.

      • Ray, my issue is I will have to go nearly 2 months without income. I can continue to work, but then loose 2 months anyway. It is a bad situation.

  118. Ray….my FRA (66) is May of 2018….I read that if I start to receive SS on January of 2018, it might be wise to do as long as I do not make over something like $44,000 between January and May of 2018….is this true??

  119. My husband and I are 1952 babies. We plan to continue working past our full retirement age as we are partners in a small business. We each have our statements from SSN and it says total family benefits cannot be more than X.
    This amount is less than if we each collect what we should per the statement. Does this mean that we are penalized as a married couple and limited to X? We have both worked all of our lives. Thanks

    • Hi Betty. Sometimes, a person may be eligible to more than one benefit at the same time. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his or her own record and as a spouse on another record. Under current law, a person’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest single benefit amount to which that person is entitled. While is possible for a person to be eligible to more than one benefit at the same time, we are only going to pay the highest benefit amount from either records – meaning that you will only be allowed to receive one payment. Visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information. Also, since you’re planning to continue to work, you may find our publication “How Works Affect Your Benefits” useful. Hope we’re able to provide clarity. Thanks!

  120. My wife will turn 66 (born June 24, 1952) next year in June. Can she start receiving benefits based on 66 in January of next year rather than waiting to June on next year.

    • Thank you for your question Ronald. Based on the information you’re providing, your wife‘s full retirement age is 66. She can only get her full retirement benefit at age 66. She could apply for benefits in January, but keep in mind that if a person begins to receive benefits prior to their full retirement age, their benefit amount is reduced a certain percentage. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all benefits an individual may qualify for, once they opt to start benefits at any time prior to their full retirement age. Please bear in mind that the decision on when to apply for your Retirement Benefits is a personal one. We can only provide you with the information to help you make the best choice according to your own situation. We offer a variety of benefit-calculators to help you plan for the future. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. We hope this information helps!

  121. I will be 66 July 5 2018. I plan on working and since I was married 14 years, divorced and not remarried draw whatever I can on my ex husbands SS. From what I understand I can do that until I decide to draw my own. I’m sure mine SS is higher than his. I plan on working another year. My confusion is taxes. I already draw a pension and my income now is over $75,000 a year. Would I just pay taxes on income?? Are these taxes paid at the end of the year??

  122. If I chose to take an early benefit. I will have no penalty as long as I don’t go over a certain amount yearly with part time work until I’m 66.
    my simple question is. Does my wife’s income affect my SS benefit each year until full retirement?

    • Hi Marty. The amount of benefits you receive is established at the time you applied for Retirement Benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings and your age at the time you applied. Generally, we use the highest years of earnings to calculate your monthly benefit amount. You can still work and receive your Social Security retirement benefits at the same time. However, if you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, we will reduce your benefit. If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, we deduct $1 from your benefit payments for every $2 you earn above the annual limit. For 2017 that limit is $16,920. This limit changes in the year you reach full retirement age. To learn more, visit our Frequently Asked Questions web page or read our publication “How Work Affects Your Benefits”. If you have specific questions, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and speak with one of our representatives. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Thanks!

  123. I will be eligible for full retirement in September 2020. My ex spouse will only be 59 then. His social security benefit will be much higher than mine. Do I have to wait until he is 62 before I can ‘top’ up my full retirement benefit to 50% of his or do I have to wait until he is 67? Also I hear you could only claim at one time so do I have to put off my retirement until he is 62 or 67?

    • Thank you for your question Michelle. Your ex-spouse must be entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits. If at age 62 (or older), your ex-spouse has not applied for retirement benefits, but can qualify for them, you can receive benefits on his or her record if you have been divorced for at least two years. Also, your benefit as a divorced spouse can ONLY be equal to one-half of your ex-spouse’s full retirement amount (or disability benefit) if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age. In the other hand, the benefit amount you receive is established at the time you applied for Retirement Benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings and your age at the time you applied. Keep in mind that if a person begins to receive Social Security benefits prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. These reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Please visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced for more information. We hope this information helps.

  124. Thank you for your prompt response – can I clarify one thing. If I apply for full retirement for myself at 66 will I then have to reapply when my ex husband is 62 (he does not expect to retire and collect his social until at least 66 maybe 70) or by taking mine at 66 (my full retirement age) would I then forego the ability to have mine made up to 50% of his full retirement? I ask because you stated that ‘ In the other hand, the benefit amount you receive is established at the time you applied for Retirement Benefit.’

    • Let us clarify Michelle. First remember that if you are eligible for both your own retirement benefits and benefits as a divorced spouse, we always pay your own benefits first. If your benefits as a divorced spouse are higher than your own retirement benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher divorced spouse benefit. For example: Let’s say that at your full retirement age you qualify for a retirement benefit of $250 and a divorced spouse’s benefit of $400. You will receive your own $250 retirement benefit, and we will add $150 from your ex-spouse’s benefit, for a total of $400. Your benefit as a divorced spouse can be equal to one-half of your ex-spouse’s full retirement amount only if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. These reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Finally, if your ex-husband does not apply for his retirement benefits, but can qualify for them and is age 62 or older, you can receive benefits on his record, if you have been divorced for at least two years. You will have to re-contact us to see if you qualify for a higher benefit on his record. Visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced for more information, or call our toll free telephone number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. if you have additional questions. Thanks.

  125. I was 66 in August 2016. I recently applied to receive SSI beginning October 2017 and am being told I am not eligible to receive any additional percentage of benefit, in other words that I will only receive what I would have receive had I not waited…..unless I wait until January 2018. That does not make any sense.But there was mention of a retro payment. I was told even if I do not take the retro I will not receive any additional percentage on my benefit unless I wait until January 2018. The additional monthly, according to SSI tables would be over $200.00 per month. Why am I being told this.

    • Hi, Deborah. Unfortunately, your question is a bit more complex than we can handle in this forum. For your security, we do not have access to information about your account. Please continue working with your local Social Security office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and speak to one of our representatives. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Thanks.

  126. Hello. My husband will be retiring at his full retirement age (66). Can I as the spouse, be able to retire under his retirement at age 65 and collect the 50% of his retirement until I decide to retire under mine, which could be when I turn 70. At that time, will I then receive my full retirement due at 70 or is it reduced because I collected under my husband for 5 years prior. Thank you.

    • Thank you for your question, Mayra. You would have to reach your full retirement age to apply and receive only your spouse’s benefit and delay receiving your retirement benefit until a later date. If you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at your full retirement age or later. Your full spouse’s benefit could be up to one-half the amount your spouse is entitled to receive at their full retirement age. However, if a person begins to receive benefits prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. You could still be eligible to collect reduced benefits on your spouse’s record. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. If you have specific questions, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and speak with one of our representatives. We hope this information helps!

  127. Born July 19, 1954. When should I apply for SSI, and when should I expect the first check? ( based on full retirement)

    • Hi! We think you may be getting our programs confused. The Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program is a needs based program that pays benefits to disabled adults and children who have limited income and resources. SSI benefits also are payable to people 65 and older without disabilities who meet the financial limits.

      If you are referring to Retirement benefits, the earliest age you can get benefits is 62, but you can wait. If you choose to get benefits before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. According to your birth date, your full retirement age is 66. It may be helpful to visit our Retirement Planning page before you decide when to apply. You can also create a my Social Security account to review estimates of your retirement, disability, and survivors benefits, your earnings record, and the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid. We hope this helps!

  128. I have a question? My husband gets SSI retirement and he still works 20 hours a week.But my question is if i work will they take away from his SSI? Because me working would put us over the 16, 920. Please help.

  129. My Spouse is 67 and receiving social security. I am still working. Can I draw a portion of his social security as his spouse even if I am still working? I am 65.

  130. i’m 65, recently lost my job and am considering filing for my soc sec. if i do….and my spouse dies….can i then refile for spousal benefits on him? right now my soc sec is more than the 50% i’d get from his retirement benefit but it is much less than i would get as a surviving spouse. i don’t mean to be morbid but as he is the main provider and i’ll still have bills to pay i’d like to get the full amount i’m due. is it possible to make the change from collecting on my work record to getting survivors benefits?

  131. Hi – I will reach full retirement age this year in Sept. 2017 – (66 yrs old) – I am also working part-time and have SS taxes deducted from my paycheck. If I start to collect SS in Sept and still work at contributing to SS, what is the benefit of this? Is it best to request from my employer to become a 1099 employee? If I stay on payroll and contribute to SS will my benefits ever increase later down the road?

    Thank you so much

  132. I Posted this once but haven’t gotten a reply. So i guess i will try again…I have a question? My husband gets SSI retirement and he still works 20 hours a week.But my question is if i work will they take away from his SSI? Because me working would put us over the 16, 920. Please help.

    • Hi Lisa, our apologies if we missed your question. The Supplemental Security Income or SSI program is a needs based program that gives cash assistance to disabled individuals with limited income and resources. The amount of SSI benefits is based, in part, on the income and resources available to the individual. For SSI eligibility, we will take into consideration any income and resources available to you, as the spouse.
      If you’re referring to your husband’s retirement benefits, and if your husband is under full retirement age and working, he is allowed to earn up to $16,920 this year, without affecting his benefits. Your wages/income does not affect his retirement benefits. You can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives area available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  133. I am 14 years older than my husband. I will be 66 in February of 2020. He will not be 67 until August of 2035. If I start drawing my full retirement benefits at 66 and if after that my husband dies before me can I then start drawing his Social Security instead?

  134. I applied for My social security to start in June this year which was 4 months before I turn 66. The request was granted but the amount was going to be $0.00 because of My earnings. I requested a withdrawal of My claim and it was granted in July. Birth month is September and I will be 66, when can I apply again to be able to draw full Social Security benefits?

  135. I started collecting ss at age 62 I am now 69 and now 100 percent disabled for the veteran administration am I entitled to ssi?

  136. I received a retro payment from soc sec for benefits Jan 2017-Jun 2017. A letter came a few days later and the way it reads i believe Medicare payments have been deducted from the retro (it says Benefits due for January 2017 through June 2017 with premiums for medical insurance deducted). I have paid medicare out of my pocket since i started with medicare in 2016. The last payment I made was for July, Aug and Sept of 2017. I also see that the medicare premium will be deducted from my first check and perhaps the next one. How can I obtain the funds that were deducted from my retro for medicare and the first couple of checks I will be receiving?

    • Hi Deborah. Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog. One of our representatives should be able to provide you with an explanation and answer your questions about this matter. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or contact your local Social Security office directly. Thanks.

  137. I have a question that I have researched and asked different people but have received no clear answer. When does the year begin for the year you reach your full retirement age if your birthday is in January? It does not seem fair that those of us born in the first 3 – 4 months of a year are penalized regarding max you can make the year you reach full retirement age if this is based on calendar year rather than the preceding 12 months.

  138. I did not receive a reply to question above. I will try and ask the same question with more specific information. I was born in January 1953. My full retirement age is in January 2019. I would like to begin drawing social security less than 12 months before reaching my full retirement age, but continue working until I earn the $40,000 plus that is allowed for retiring the year before full retirement age. When does my year before full retirement age begin? Does it begin on the first month of full retirement age, i.e., January 2019 or does it begin in February 2018? It does not seem fair if it based upon calendar year since drawing social security in February 2018 means I have only one month to made the $40,000 that results in keeping all my social security payment benefits whereas someone born in July or August 1953 would have up to 6 or 7 months to earn the $40,000 plus that is allowed for working and receiving SS benefits. Does Social Security Administration go by calendar year for defining year of reaching full retirement or does SSA use the 12 months preceding the month you reach full retirement age as time period when you can earn up to $40,000 without there being a reduction to Social Security benefits?

    Thanks to anyone who can clarify this issue!

    • Thank you for your question, Vernon. We count your earnings during a calendar year. For someone attaining their full retirement age in 2017, the limit of their earnings is $44,880, but we only count earnings before the month individuals reach their full retirement age. In your case, you will be considered full retirement age the 1st day of the month in January 2019. If you work and are full retirement age or older, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. Please read our publication “How Work Affects Your Benefits” for more information.

  139. Hi, my name is Rachel; I am 62 now and on January 11th I will be 63…if I want to begin my application now to have my benefits begin after my birthday in 2018 when would be the best time to apply?
    Also I have a fabulous Pension Plan will what I get from my Pension affect my Social Security Benefits?

  140. Hello, I wondered about retirement benefits and survivor benefits. I am 64 and my husband is 62 and his work record, as it relates to Social Security, is much better than mine. He plans to take his Social Security at age 70 and I plan to take mine at FRA of 66. If, heaven forbid, my husband died before either of us reached retirement age, would I be able to take my own retirement benefit early and then take my survivor benefit when I reach my full retirement age at 66. I just want to make sure that if I had to take my retirement benefit early, that does not affect my survivor benefit.

    • Thank you for contacting us, Rosanne. A widow can start receiving reduced benefits as early as age 60. In many cases, a widow can begin receiving one benefit at a reduced rate and then, at full retirement age, switch to the other benefit at an unreduced rate. The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation. You cannot apply for survivor’s benefits online. You will need to contact your local office, or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. for assistance. Please visit our Retirement Planner for more information.

  141. My husband is now 54 and is not expected to live more then 5 years. He has a rare dementia called Posterior Cortical atrophy. I am 51 and his full time caregiver.

    As I understand it, I will not get his SSDI until I am 60 unless I am disabled and the disability began 7 months prior to his disability. But do I also get a reduced benefit SSDI at 60, so 26percent less? We have no savings left.

  142. My retirement age is 66, but if i work until i am 65 and 3 months, but do not take social security until i am 66 is there a reduction in my social security?

    • Great question, Dennis! Your retirement age is the age at which you begin receiving Social Security retirement benefits. Your stop work age is the age at which you leave the labor force and no longer work. It can affect the amount of your Social Security retirement benefits. Your retirement benefit is based on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits. For more information, visit our Retirement Planner: The Difference Between Retirement Age & Stop Work Age webpage. We have an online calculator called the Retirement Estimator where you can test various scenarios and retirement ages to estimate your benefits.
      You can also create a mySocialSecurity account to review estimates of your retirement, disability, and survivors benefits, your earnings record, and the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid. We hope this helps!

  143. Just turned 62. If I claim ss benefits now on my husband’s account , will the amount change upon his death? He has been retired since 2009?

    • Hi, Linda. If you are under full retirement age and qualify on your own record, we will pay that amount first. But if you also qualify for a higher amount as a spouse, you’ll get a combination of benefits that equals that higher amount. Also keep in mind, your spouse must be receiving Retirement or Disability benefits as well. Find more information at our webpage, “Benefits For You As A Spouse”. Generally survivors benefits are paid at a higher rate. The amount of a widow’s or widower’s benefit is based on several factors, including: the spouse’s earnings, when the spouse started receiving their benefits, the age at the time of the spouse’s death, and the amount of the individual’s own retirement benefit. We compare their own benefit with the spouse’s benefit. If the survivor’s benefit would be higher than the individual’s own current retirement benefit at the time of the spouse’s passing, the individual would be eligible for widow’s or widower’s benefits. Please visit our “Survivors Planner: If You Are The Worker’s Widow Or Widower” page for more information. We hope this helps!

  144. my husband will be 66 on October 2, 2018. at that time he plans to take his social security benefits, but continue to work. are we taxed on the social security and can I draw from his social security and mine? I will be 62 this December 2017 and would like to draw my benefits. Can I also draw off of my husband at 62?

    • Hi, Glenda. First, under current law, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) considers Social Security benefits taxable income for beneficiaries whose countable income exceeds certain limits. Second, if you are eligible for benefits as a spouse and qualify on your own record, we will pay that amount first. But if you also qualify for a higher amount as a spouse, you’ll get a combination of benefits that equals that higher amount. Also keep in mind, your spouse must be receiving Retirement or Disability benefits as well. Find more information at our webpage, “Retirement Planner: Benefits For You as A Spouse.” For more information, contact us at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask a representative to assist you. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the day. You can also contact your local office. We hope this helps!

  145. Hi, I am 64, birthday 01/04/1953. I have been on SSDI since 2006 and receive ss plus benefits from MetLife monthly making 60% of yearly income. MetLife rep tells me my benefits from MetLife ends 01/03/2018 as I turn 65. But since my full retirement is thru SSDI goes until I am 66, another year. Why does my MetLife benefits not continue for another full year too? I have been bouncing this back an forth with MetLife. They first told me I signed paperwork saying my MetLife benefits ended at 65, but they don’t have the paper, but it is in my benefits booklet saying 65. I am asking for copies of each. It seems like it should cover another year since this change was decided in like 2000, right? What do you think? Thanks, Matt

  146. I was married 10 yrs or more and divorced. His income has always been higher than mine. If I retire at 63 and take a portion of his benefits while he is still alive, if he passes away, would I be able to reapply for a higher percentage of his benefits, or would I be locked into the amount I would be entitled to at the time of my retirement at 63?

  147. My ex-husband and I divorced after 15 years of marriage. He’s currently 59, and I’m 65. If I start to receive social-security benefits based on my own earnings record before I reach full-retirement age (66), will that reduce the amount I can later receive based on my ex-husband’s higher earnings? In other words, will I still qualify for the full 50% of my ex-husband’s full-retirement-age benefits, even though I started receiving benefits based on my own earnings record before I reached full-retirement age?

  148. Hi my dad was born on March 15, 1956, if he decides to get benefits it will be at a reduce rate is that correct? Also what benefits does my mother get? What other benefits can he apply for since he cannot work anymore because of back problems. Please let me know.

    Thanks.

    • Thank you for your questions Ray. If your dad was born in 1956, his full retirement age is 66 and 4 months. You are correct, if a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. In the other hand, we pay disability benefits to individuals who are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last one year or more or to result in death. In addition to meeting our definition of disability, individuals must have worked long enough–and recently enough–under Social Security to qualify for disability benefits. If a person thinks that he or she meets our definition of disability, we encourage them to apply for disability benefits as soon as when they become disabled. Please visit our “Frequently Asked Questions” web page on disability for more information.
      Generally, the worker’s spouse may be eligible for a benefit based on the worker’s earnings, at age 62. See our Retirement Planner: Benefits For Your Spouse to learn more. We hope this information helps!

  149. Both my wife and I will receive benefits. She is planning on taking her SS at 62 but we will wait until I’m 70 to take mine. If my benefits are higher than hers will she receive more after my passing?

  150. in 2014 when I turned 66-1/2 I retire on my ex’s ss.
    I kept working & still do. I want to retire on my record as I will receive more $ when I turn 70 next June. Do I make this change before or after my birthdate?
    Thank you

    • Hi, Maria. You should apply three months before you want your benefits to start. You can contact us:
      By phone – Call 1-800-772-1213. (TTY 1-800-325-0778) from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday.
      In person – Visit your local Social Security office. (Call first to make an appointment.)

  151. I visited a local social security office inquiring about survivor benefits. I was told the year i turn 66 (January 1), not my birthday (September) I could start receiving survivor benefits.
    When I called for an appointment to have the above start, SS said I could not get the survivor benefit until I actually turned 66.

    • Hi Alva. Unfortunately, your issue may be a bit more complex than we can handle in this forum. For your security, we do not have access to information about your account in this venue. Please continue working with your local office in this matter.

  152. Hello. My husband was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). He filed for disability, but also filed for social security for the interim. I was 62 on 9/1, and know I will have to retire to care for him soon. Am I allowed to collect social security on my own record while he is collecting disability? Also, how will my early retirement ultimately affect an eventual spousal survivor benefit, as his disability payment will be higher than my social security benefit.

  153. I am scheduled to start early retirement in October 2017, I have worked until the end of September, my company pays biweekly. I am to be paid on Oct. 5 for work in September. It will be more than the 1410 limit. why does this count as Oct. income reducing my November benefit by 1/2, if this money was only earned in Sept.

    • Congratulations! After you retire, you may receive payments for work you did before you started getting Social Security benefits. Usually, those payments will not affect your Social Security benefit if they are for work done before you retired. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further guidance about this issue. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will experience a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Thanks!

        • I called back today, got what seemed to be a very well informed representative who told me that ss didn’t look at what I made before and that I could keep earning as much as I wanted as long as it was below the annual limit, that they looked at it which ever way it was best for me.

    • Hi Rick. Social Security changes or updates are generally announced each year in late October. As always, we will keep you informed.

  154. Hello, I have been receiving my SS benefits since age 62. When my husband turned 66, nearly 4 years ago he started taking benefits on my SS. When he turns 70 in December will he be eligible to receive his full age 70 benefit? Accordingl to the SS table he is eligible for over 3500 per month at that time. Or will it be reduced because he has been getting benefits on me?

    • Hi Jan, thank you for your question. Section 831 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, made some changes to Social Security’s laws about claiming retirement and spousal benefits. Individuals turning 62 prior to January 1, 2016 who are eligible for both; benefits on their own record and spouse’s benefits, can choose –if they apply for benefits at their full retirement age- to receive only the spouse’s benefit and delay receiving their retirement benefit until a later date. These individuals would be able to collect delayed retirement benefits up to age 70 and receive the highest benefit amount possible under their own record without penalties. We hope this helps!

  155. I am retiring at age 51 with 30 years of service with the state of NC. If I take option 4 for NC retirement and receiving a part of my social security money now, may I still work at private industry or a private school and make any amount even though I am getting the leveling social security? Can I make as much as I want and still get my state retirement an social security leveling even though I return to work?
    If so, is the amount I can make unlimited or limited if I choose social security leveling when I retire?
    If it is limited, how much can I make?

  156. My husband is receives a reduced benefit because he began collecting before his full retirement. He has since reached the full retirement age. I am 10 years younger but have put in all the necessary quarters. My monthly amount is already higher than he receives. If I die before my full retirement (but had not applied) is he entitled to my higher amount now?

  157. I turn 65 in December 2017, I want to start drawing SS in January 2018. Will they go back and pick up December 2017 and say that I am over the earnings limit for the year and lower my benefit for just December?

    • Your Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of January, you will receive your first benefit payment in February. In this scenario, your wages for the month of December will not affect your benefits. Remember, you can continue to work and receive your Social Security retirement benefits at the same time. However, if you plan to continue working, there are limits on how much you can earn each year prior to attaining your full retirement age. To learn more, read our publication: “How Work Affects Your Benefits”. We hope this information helps!

  158. This is an outstanding service to help explain a very confusing process. Thank you! I have two questions My wife and I are both 68. She started receiving her ss benefit at age 62. I am delaying mine until 70 1/2 to receive the higher benefit. 1: My full retirement benefit is/will be more than double the benefit my wife currently receives. Can she now receive the spousal benefit instead of her own current benefit? (I think that would be about $300/month more than she receives now.) 2: Can I somehow receive a spousal benefit on her current payment while I continue to delay my own benefit payments until I reach 70 1/2? Sorry for the dumb questions but I have a really hard time understanding the various options. Thanks!

    • Hi, Bob. Remember that the benefit your wife can receive on your record, can only be equal to one-half of your full retirement amount, if she starts receiving benefits at her full retirement age. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Your wife may still be eligible to collect benefits on your record when you apply for your benefits. We will have to review her record at that time, to see if she qualifies for a higher benefit amount.
      In the other hand, the new rules specify that if you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply, if you apply for benefits at full retirement age or later. You can choose to receive only the spouse’s benefit and delay receiving your retirement benefit until a later date, and earn delayed retirement credits up until age 70. The benefit increase no longer applies when you reach age 70, even if you continue to delay taking benefits. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week or later during the day. We hope this helps.

  159. I work for local, city government and pay into OPERS and Ohio Deferred Comp. I am 64 and plan to retire in 5 years (age 69) with 30 years service with the city. I am divorced (married for almost 20 years) Can I start receiving SS on my ex’s record when I turn 66, and if I do, will that reduce the monthly benefits I will get from OPERS and Ohio Deferred Comp when I retire at age 69?

  160. I am 59, my wife is 58. I started receiving Social Security Disability this year. If I die before my or my wife’s full retirement age would she continue to receive my current benefits or would they be stopped until she reached her full retirement age? Yes, she would collect my Social Security which would be way higher than hers.

  161. SS notified me that I will be receiving my benefits in February. I filed in October, my birthday is in December. I thought the benefits were paid the month after your eligibility month, which would be January. Why are mine being paid in February? Thanks so much

    • You’re right Kay, your Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. However, Social Security pays your benefit after you have lived throughout the month. At 62, the first month many people are eligible for benefits may be in the month after their birthday. When starting benefits after age 62, people are eligible to be paid for the month they file, since they were previously age 62 throughout the month. Please contact our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 if you need further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week, thanks.

  162. Not sure how to word this, but here it goes. If my husband is a higher earner and we both retire at 66 (born in 54), can I hold out from collecting my Social Security and get 50% of my spouse retirement. Or do I need to start mine and the what the difference is up to 50 % of his.

    • Hi Debra, thank you for your question. If you were born between 1943 and 1954, your full retirement age is 66. Section 831 of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015, made some changes to Social Security’s laws about claiming retirement and spousal benefits. Individuals turning 62 prior to January 1, 2016 who are eligible for both; benefits on their own record and spouse’s benefits, can choose –if they apply for benefits at their full retirement age– to receive only the spouse’s benefit and delay receiving their retirement benefit until a later date. These individuals would be able to collect delayed retirement credits up to age 70 and receive the highest benefit amount possible under their own record without penalties. We hope this information helps!

  163. If this is true why am I still receiving Disability and not Social Security at 65 years of age, shouldn’t it have changed when I turned 65? Every time we get a new President the age changes 2 years and screws me up, thats not right!

    • Hi Nora. When you receive disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, we automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, when you attain your Full Retirement Age. Full retirement age had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959.

  164. I am planning on retiring at the end of January 2018 and my wife doesn’t work, how much will approximately, will all Medicare insurance? She just completed her last chemo and all test have came back good and chemo did what is was too. I had a bone transplant in September 2015 and medicine regular blood checks but other than that, pretty well healthy

  165. I’ll b 65 in July if I retire how much will I get and can I still wk if so how long and does it affect my benefits permanently

  166. At what age can my wife draw a full 50% of my social security. Must I die before she gets a full 50%.
    she is drawing a portion of my benefits now but not a full 50%

  167. My husband died at the age of 82, in 2016. At that time he was receiving over 1400.a month. On my birthday February 21,2017, I turned 62. I am only receiving 497.00. I feel cheated. Not fair how options are presented to you.

  168. Hello, i am taking my social security at 62 and i work part time. I will not gross past $17,000.00 so my social security. Is $1146.00 per month. My wife is 58 and works, will her income affect my social security? Thank you

  169. I applied for early social security in April 2017 at 62 years old. I did not start recieving benefits until June 2017. I dropped down in April 2017, from full time at my job to part time only working 5 days every 2 weeks I was told I could not make more than $16,920.00 per year. My question is, Will Social Security count the full time earnings from Jan – April, even though I didnt apply until April 2017 and started recieving my monthly S.S., benefits in June 2017?
    I am worried that I have gone over the limit that I was told I could make even though I didnt start to collect until June.

  170. If the wife has been married before and divorced and is 74, and currently married to a 55 year old and they have been married for 30 years, can she draw social security off of the divorced husband or current husband? Naturally the current husband isn’t drawing social security yet.

  171. Hello. I would like to if you can help me to get benefits switched from my deceased husband’s social security number to my own if, that would increase the benefit amount.
    My Medicare deductions are high because I am very near depleting my retirement so it looks like I have a good income.
    There are 5 people in living with me. Plus I help my daughter every month with her utilities; phone, ComEd, internet at her home ($500.00 p/m) She works partime with a college student and a 7 year old. She was fulltime before her last child was born but now they won’t allow her to return, in fact they say are laying off.
    It takes $3,850 per month to run this (MY) house and that just house note and utilities.
    Three adults need better income which is why all the expenses are on me with no help. Now I am losing my house because I can no longer afford it and all that goes with it, (repairs for heating, cooling, plumbing and now I need a new washer and refrigerator)
    By the way my transportation, meds, credit cards, vacations (if any) and groceries are not included.
    I can’t afford ANY deductions and mine are pretty stiff.

  172. hi I just turned 61 years old now and my benefit will be $1460 if i retire at 62 what would it be if i stopped working right now. What would the payment be at 62 years old.

    Thanks
    John

  173. I have received benefits since retiring in 2011, but have continued to work a part-time job. Overpayments reconciliation have become a hazard each year and I continue to be painstakingly faithful to the process. Now that I have reached full retirement age, I am entitled by policy to have my benefits reviewed so that I may recoup prior financial losses and recalculate my actual, earned benefit. For some reason that has not happened yet and it has been about six months since I turned 66 years old. And now my usual SSA website, with all the same information as always is giving me a headache while trying to access relevant information. Can anyone in your administration give me some meaningful feedback about where I stand and what to do next?

  174. Hi, I am currently receiving social security disability payments. What happens when I reach full retirement age? For me that’s 66 and 10 months.
    Is my disability stopped and my social security retirement started or does something else happen? I don’t seem to find the information anywhere on the website.
    Thanks for your reply.

    • Hi Robert. When you receive disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, we will automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, when you attain your full retirement age. Benefits are not interrupted with this transition and the benefit amount will generally remains the same. Thanks!

  175. I just learned that SSA counts 10 months towards my retirement – 8 good years and 2 bad years. Unfortunately although I never collected disability for my Bipolar illness – it was difficult to treat as the doctors misdiagnosed and did not understand how to talk to patients to explain and help them – I made $288 one of the two years. I was too incapacited to work full time – a symptom of the illness. That year is counted and the fullness of my last 17 years are ignored.

    My SSA will not allow me to reduce hours of work sufficiently to have time to deal with arthritis, pay my bills, or remain in my home in the great state of California.

    Does it make sense to punish someone who did not use disability checks, lost quite a few years living close to the poverty line to take care of children and myself? Is there an answer?

    My question is why and if there is any answer for ones who worked hard to benefit late from returning to work. – a treatment in itself

    • Thank you for your question Elnora. Your Social Security retirement benefits end upon death. If a person dies and there are no eligible survivors, any unused money goes to the Social Security trust funds.

  176. I have been on disabiltiy since 1993. I couldn’t work and i only get 501.00 a month. Obama never gave us a yearly increase. Now we get a 2.0% increase. Which brings me up to 619.00. Then Social security deducts 118.00.Brings me back to 501.00 no raise. Being sick and not able to work this is a small amount to live on. How can anyone live on this.

    • Hi Joan. You may be eligible to receive assistance from the state where you live. Medicare enrollees who have limited income and resources may get help paying for their premiums and out-of-pocket medical expenses through the Medicare Savings Programs (MSP). Please call the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services at 1-800-633-4227 for more information. We hope this information is helpful.

  177. I will be 65 in march I lost my job not of anything I did also I fell out of a loader while getting out, I have familial tremmors and falling has messed my neck up my shoulders are worn out and the fall has caused problems with my hips where I work would do nothing for me, My son has had cancer 5 times plus other problems my daughter also had cancer. Im on unemployment will loose it next month need an mri but cant afford it. would like to get disability cant find a job now I shake real bad, cant get any help please at least tell me something

    • Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

    • Great question, Harold. Full retirement age had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959. We consider you of full retirement age the 1st day of the month, you attain your full retirement age. Visit our Retirement Age Calculator for more information. Thanks!

  178. I see a big problem here concerning our Social Security Benefits for us retirees. Congress has been digging into our funds for billions & billions of dollars while we sleep.
    Congress, not us retirees or people’s should have to pay this money back into our Social Security Benefits Fund. I can’t & don’t understand where or what this money was taken for & nobody asked our permission?
    So Congress Pay Our Billions of Dollars back$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ it’s only fair to us who only survive on what we get monthly from Our Social Security Retirement Fund. President Trump, please look out for us retirees, we are depending on You & Our Money we put into our government for Our Needs for when we reached Our Age of Retirement.
    Help Us Please Mr. President & get Congress who make to much money as it is to pull it together & pay back Our Billions that they Stole from Us! No Disrespect Only The Truth……..we’re counting on You to help Us in this desperate matter. It’s hard to make ends meet every month with the prices so high for food & other necessities we all need at Our ages….
    Thank You So Much If You Are Reading This Letter from me. We & I need Your Help Now kind Sir!

  179. I already typed a comment & letter to Our President for Help with Our Social Security Retirements Funds.
    Not a luxury but what we deserve & paid into for Our future which is right now……thank you

  180. I have been receiving 1/2 of my husband’s benefits, but in January I turn 70 & would like to receive my full benefit.
    Please call 214-455-4140 or send forms I need to complete.

    • Thank you for contacting us, Beth. Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance, you can apply for your benefits online at any time now. If you need further assistance call our toll free number, 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) and ask to speak with one of our representatives, who are available Monday through Friday between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  181. In two years my wife and I plan on retiring – she will be 62 and I will be 66. If she elects to start social security can I claim under hers? If so how much would I get AND at age 70 I will start drawing mine.

    At my death can my spouse move over to my social security because mine would be higher at that point.

  182. I started collecting my SSI at 62 years old,
    . My husband is a year and 2 months younger am
    Nd wants to start collecting his SSI at 66 years old. He was born 7/11/1952 p. I was born 5/1/1951. Can I get half of his SSI when he starts rec’v his SSI?

    • Hi Christine, you may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits when your husband starts receiving his retirement benefits. Keep in mind, that if a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. You may still be eligible to collect reduced benefits on your husband’s record. Remember, if someone is eligible for both, his or her own benefit and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay their own first. If their spousal benefits are higher than their own retirement benefits, he or she will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit.
      For more information, please see our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse. We hope this helps.

  183. Who. Know if. Going to live. Till you. Are. 70. The government. Suck. You. Work. All. You. Lives. To. Have. Money. To. Retire. On. And. Government. Sticking. Our. Money. In. There. Pocket. Good. Lord. Will. Get. Ya. For. That. You can. Believe That. I. Hope. Jesus. Get. Y’all. Thank you for your. Time.

    • I. Had. To retire. Cause my. Wife. Is. Handicap. I. Could not Afford. To.have people’s. To sit. With. Her so. I. Have. To. Sit. With. Her. So. That why. I. Need my. Disability I. Have. Bad. Knees

      • Hi Phil, the Social Security Act sets out a strict definition for disability. We pay disability benefits to people who are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last one year or more or to end in death. However, if a person believes they are disabled and meets our definition of disability, we encourage them to apply for disability as soon as they become disabled. For more information visit our Disability Planner: Social Security Protection If You Become Disabled, or see our “Frequently Asked Questions” web page on disability. We hope this information helps!

  184. My wife is retirement age but has a number of “zero” year earnings, mostly during the years our children were young. She has not started to pull her Social Security benefits yet. Her top 35 year calculation will include a number of these zero’s. She did work part time in 2017. When (Month/Day in 2018) will her 2017 earnings populate her Social Security files (and thereby push out one of those early zero years) to determine her benefits if she decides to file for retirement benefits?

  185. I have put off drawing my social security until I turn 70 in six weeks I have not seen anything about how and when to do this. I have been drawing on my husband’s social security. I don’t know what I need to do to draw my own and have not been able to find any information about this. please tell me what to do.

  186. MARK C BILLINGS on January 7, 2018 at 12:11 am said:
    I’m 69 and receiving SSI benifits. My wife is 60 and still working full time. I putting together a file in my computer to help her on all the things she will need to know, people to contact and financial info should I die before she stops working. My question is if I die before her will she be eligible to receive my SSI benifits.

  187. how old do you have to be to continue to work full time and draw social security benefits and not affect the money you make from your job.

  188. If I collect my benefits (at a reduced amount) at age 62 but I am a widow and my husband died (after collecting one SS disability check) can I;
    Collect his FRA when I retire? Would it be at my FRA (66 +2 months) or what his age would be when I retire at age 66 +2months (he would be 69?) Or is it only at his age of 66 + 2 months? His DOB is 11/20/1953. My DOB is 9/8/55
    Thank you,
    Deborah L Aquino

    • Thank you for your question, Deborah. If you become a widow, you can receive reduced benefits as early as age 60 (age 50 if disabled).
      If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for.
      The monthly amount you would get is a percentage of the deceased’s basic Social Security benefit. It depends on your age and the type of benefit you would be eligible to receive.
      In many cases, a widow can restrict the scope of her application and start receiving survivor’s benefits, while delaying her own retirement benefit and earn delayed retirement credits.
      The rules are complicated and vary depending on the situation. We recommend that you contact your local office or call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  189. If a person has been on disability for years, did their status change from full disability to full retirement in 1028? If so, why did that happen and are the benefits the same, such as health care and monetary benefit amount?

  190. I was,born in November 5 1954 . What age can i retire and collect full benefits from social security . And can i still work and collect my full social security full benefits

  191. On December 29 this year i will be 62 years of age, and plan on starting to draw my SSN. Starting in January 2019. So what forms or paperwork do i need to have on hand or need to have on hand to start the process. Also when should i start the process in order to start getting my SSN in January-2019.

  192. I just turned 67yo and my wife just turned 62. Neither of us have filed a SS claim yet. Can she file for SS now (early) and I collect 50% of her amount so I can delay my filing until I reach 70yo? If not, is there another strategy we as a married couple can take? Thank you.

  193. Will the family law courts recognize the new retirement age as 66 and 2 months when deciding the legality of allowing the spousal support payor to retire at 65 (currently) given the reduction in ss payout?

  194. I starting receiving SS Benefits at 62, I was married for over 10 years and never remarried. Am I correct that if I were to apply for benefits from my Exhusband that my SS benefit that I now receive would have to be less than the 50% of his current benefit. I’m assuming that the percentage of my SS Benefit from 62 to full retirement would enter into this also. If so what is the percentage?
    Thanks

    • You’re right, Sue. Your benefit as a divorced spouse can be equal to one-half of your ex-husband’s full retirement amount, only if you start receiving those benefits at your full retirement age. If a person begins to receive Social Security benefits prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. These reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits By Year Of Birth web page for information on the reduction percentages.
      We hope this helps!

  195. I started receiving Social Security benefits after I turned 67 years old in March, 2017. Birthdate 03/03/1951.
    What is the gross maximum amount can I make on my job without being penalized. Does this total add my social security benefits I received to this figure?

  196. Hi…I was born in 1951, which means I hit full retirement age last year (2017). Yesterday, Jan 30, I started my application to receive SS benefits, but halfway through I thought….hey, if I wait just a few more months, I’ll be eligible for age 67 benefits, which is 8% more than age 66 benefits. So, my question is….am I “stuck” receiving age 66 benefits because I already started my application, or can I just wait a few months to FINISH the application process and get more money every month?…I’m probably not the only person who has thought of this, and I can’t find an answer anywhere on the SS.gov site. Thanks for all your answers on this site.

    • Hello Mike, if you change your mind, you may be able to withdraw your Social Security claim and re-apply at a future date. However, you must do this within 12 months of your original retirement date. One of our agents can assist you in regards to your unfinished application. Please contact your local Social Security office or call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  197. I started work at 15 ,was born in 1956 ,due to I’ll health I am now on Earning and support +personnel independent payment. Living in a retirement home with meals in Arbroath. What is my retirement age please.

  198. if you are receiving gross pay social security disability of 1919 per month what will it be when reach age 66 and it turns into retirement benefits Thank you

  199. If I take my social security 1 year early what
    percentage will be deducted from my original
    benefits? I just turned 65 in January.

  200. My husband passed in 2016, along with his death our income stopped. He was receiving Army Ret. and SS benefits. I am 56 years old with a low income now and want to know if I can start collecting his SS benefits when I reach 59 years old.

  201. I have a question my mom is going to be 70 in April. My father passed away in 2004 he was receiving SSD. She was receiving SSD when my Dad passed does she receive more money now that she will be full retirement age?

  202. A person born in 1952 can retire when? What age is full retirement?
    Also can the person collect off of a ex spouses and if so what age?

  203. on the application for SSecurity they ask for and end date for employment, if I’m still working till April 30th what date do I enter/ ( a future date cannot be entered)?

    • Hi Sharon, please call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available between 7a.m. and 7p.m., Monday through Friday.
      Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Happy retirement!

  204. I turn 65 ,in April. I am on social security disability.do I go on regular social security.?.I have worked part-time, for 3 years.Does this change my monthly social security amount.

    • Hi Roger, Social Security disability benefits automatically change to retirement benefits when disability beneficiaries attain their full retirement age.
      Full retirement age had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959.
      The benefit amount that you’re receiving, is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings.
      Disability benefits are established at the highest rate possible based on your earnings record.
      Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically. We hope this information helps.

  205. I am 65 yrs old born 1952, I am disabled and receiving disability. I met this lady and she is 68, I just became a widower in Nov. 1917. The lady , her husband been dead for 10 yrs. We realize we both dont have alot of time left. What are the pro and cons of getting married or just living together.

    • Hello Mr. Steven! At 68, you’ve reached your full retirement age. If you work and are full retirement age or older, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. Please read our publication “How Work Affects Your Benefits” for more information.

  206. I plan to retire April 6,2018. I will be 65 years old on that date. I am planning to get on my husband’s group plan. Do I need to apply for Medicare part A and B if I will be on his insurance plan?

    • Hello Christine, if your husband is actively working and you are covered under his employer’s group health insurance program, you can delay enrollment into Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) until your husband stops working or the health coverage is dropped. You can just enroll in Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance).
      However, we suggest that individuals speak to their health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future.
      To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.Medicare.gov.
      For specific questions about your case, call 1-800-772-1213, M-F between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask a representative to assist you, or you can contact your local office directly. Hope this helps!

  207. I have a question. I am retiring for 62-year-old retirement. Lost my job and I don’t have a choice. I’ve never got remarried and we were married for 17 years. If I start getting my check in June, say in December he passes away etc. Will I be able to get survivors Widows benefits? He’s turning 65 in March this year. Will they be reduced or will I get anything?

    • Hi Donna. Survivor’s Benefits are paid at a higher rate. Sometimes, a person could be entitled to more than one benefit at the same time and may receive a combination of benefits equaling a higher amount. For example, a person may be entitled as a retired worker on his/her own record and also as a spouse or widow on another record. However, this individual’s benefit amount can never exceed the highest of either benefit amount to which they are entitled to.
      If you are the divorced spouse of a worker who dies, you could get benefits just the same as a widow or widower, provided that your marriage lasted 10 years or more. We hope this information helps!

  208. I started taking full SS benefits at age 70. I have 26 years of substantial qualified income. I looked at the WEP chart and know that my benefit would be reduced if I take the Texas Retirement System monthly benefit for which I am qualified.
    What is my “eligibility year”? I
    If I take the TRS monthly pension starting in August, 2018, how much will that affect my SS benefit?

  209. If you are currently drawing SS prior to full retirement age and working part time, can you stop social security and beginning working full time without a penalty?

    • Thank you for your question, Tonya. When you receive Social security benefits and work at the same time, we usually ask that you give us an estimate of your earnings for the year. If later you realize your earnings will be higher or lower than you estimated, we ask that you notify us as soon as possible so that we adjust or suspend your benefits, if necessary and prevent an overpayment on your record.
      To learn more about “How Work Affects Your Benefits”, visit our Frequently Asked Questions web page for more information. Please call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
      Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day.

  210. I was born on 1/07/1953.
    I want to know the date I have to apply for the Medicare
    And
    Then
    Social security benefits

    • Medicare is our country’s health insurance program for people age 65 or older. You can start receiving your retirement benefits as early as age 62, or delay filing up to age 70. If you decide to get benefits before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. You may find our Early or Late Retirement Calculator helpful.
      Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance, and you can apply for your benefits online. Remember that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of April, you will receive your first benefit payment in May.
      Please visit our Social Security Retirement Planner for more information. Thanks!

  211. Can I collect restricted application money on my X, if I was married 20 years, now and wait till I’m 70, to draw my SS, now I’m 2018?

    • Hello Diane. If you were born before January 2, 1954, and have already reached full retirement age, you can choose to receive only the divorced spouse’s benefit and delay receiving your retirement benefit until a later date. If your birthday is January 2, 1954 or later, the option to take only one benefit at full retirement age no longer exists.
      See our Benefit Planner: If You’re Divorced, for more information.

  212. I turned 62 before the changes to Social Security rules in 2017 went into effect. My spouse will turn 62 in 2018. Am I still allowed to “file and suspend” my Social Security payments?

    • Hello Roy, First,if you turn 62 on or after January 2, 2016, and will be eligible for benefits both as a retired worker and as a spouse (or divorced spouse), then “Deemed Filing” applies to you.
      To your second question: Yes, you can still voluntarily suspend benefit payments at your full retirement age in order to earn higher benefits for delaying.
      See “What do the Recent Social Security Claiming Changes Mean for Me” for more information on the changes of the new law. Thanks!

  213. I think it’s disgusting the government borrowed from Social Security and all of us who have worked our life, have to now wait until 67, just to extend benefits. Who creates these ideas and we have no say. The benefits should NEVER have changed, people get sick as they get older, you shouldn’t have to be forced to work, when your dream was tor retire at 62. This is just so wrong and shame on social security for letting this happen

    • Hello Cindy! You can still apply and start receiving retirement benefits as early as age 62, but if you decide to get benefits before your full retirement age, they will be reduced. In the other hand, starting to receive benefits after full retirement age may result in larger benefits. To find out what your full retirement age is, use our Retirement Age Chart.
      Our system is set up to take applications three months in advance, and you can apply for your retirement and Medicare benefits online. Please visit our Social Security Retirement Planner for more information.
      Also, Social Security is a pay-as-you-go system. Social Security taxes collected from today’s workers pay the benefits of today’s retirees. Any funds in excess of what is needed to pay today’s benefits are invested in special issue, U.S. Government, interest-bearing securities. This investment – the purchase of U.S. Government securities – is what constitutes the “borrowing” that people are sometimes concerned about. Any funds that have been “borrowed” from the Social Security Trust Funds have always been paid back in full, plus interest. Please check out our Trust Fund Frequently Asked Questions page for more information. Thanks!

      We hope this helps!

  214. I stated receiving my full retirement at age 66 (08/31/1950) and I have continued to work full time until April 2017, when i had to limited working due to health reasons,related to work. Now I am going to have to stop work all together soon ,because my hands no longer allow me to hold transducer with out severe pain. As a single women am i entitled to apply for disability.

  215. I don’t like wording in #3 above: 1st sentence-a person’s retirement date has no bearing on one’s SS benefit. Taking your SS benefit early does affect your or your surviving spouse’s survivor benefit. Retirement date & early benefits are two different things; 2nd sentence-you say you cannot pay a surviving spouse their full retirement age benefit if you took your retirement benefit early. Why not? If a surviving spouse has his or her own benefit & waits to FRA to take it, they’ll get their FRA benefit. Their surviving spouse benefit will be reduced, not their own.

  216. I was injured at work on 7/27/2017. My attorney at that time applied for me for social security disability and put me in for early retirement. I was 63 at he time of filing on 10/2017. It is now April I will be 64 . I checked my social security disability status. The chart shows step 2 of 3 . My retirement shows step 1 of 2 . How long do I have to wait for both.

  217. I was injured at work on 7/17/2017. My attorney filed in my behalf SSDisability and retirement in October2017. I was 63 years old. It is now April 2018 I will be 64. I checked my social security status. It shows in my disability claim that it is on step 2 of 3. And my retirement is showing step 1 of 2. When can I expect my early retirement and my disability.

  218. My husband started collecting social security at full retirement age, I started collecting at 62. If my husband should die what percentage will I receive?
    Will my collecting earlier affect what will be paid to me should he die?

  219. Both my wife and I have worked. We get Social Security for both of us as long as we are alive, correct?

    • Thank you for your question, Thomas. Generally, Social Security benefits end upon your death or after a determination by the Social Security Administration that you no longer qualify.

  220. I was born Feb 23, 1957. When can I receive benefits from my husband’s SS? Will that affect my benefits?
    Can I collect from his before I retire?

    • To qualify for spouse’s benefits, you must be at least 62 years of age. To learn more about Social Security spouse’s benefits and your own retirement benefits click here. Also, see the information on the recent Claiming Changes and Deemed Filing.
      Our Retirement Planner provides complete information about your retirement benefits. Thanks!

  221. What happens when I go from SSDI to Retirement at 66 years old? Will I still be disabled? Will I be pushed into working after being SSD for 34 years?
    Thank you,
    Gena

  222. when i turn 66 this year can i collect 1/2 of my husbands social security and right now he is working and so am i but he also collects social security, will that effect his check now he gets from social security???

  223. I’m here in Texas and am 66 years old, I’ve worked for 33yrs I haven’t applied for my SS. Retirement yet but being a Disabled Veteran I get V.A. Non-Service Connected Disability, however at the beginning of each year everything goes up in cost that the VA Comp. Isn’t enough to hardly get by, my question; can I get my S.S. Retirement & hold on to my V.A. Non-Service Connected disability at the same time? Housing cost etc. is Overwhelming.

  224. Almost all explanations on drawing stratagies assume that the wife is younger and earned less than the husband. We are not a typical couple. My wife is currently 60 and the lower wage earner. I’m currently 53 and the higher wage earner. If she draws at her FRA and I wait until age 70 to draw my own benefit, when can she draw a spousal benefit? Can she draw once I reach my FRA or does she have to wait until I start drawing my own benefit at age 70?

  225. I do not have 40 credits, when I retire will I be able to work off of my wife’s social security while she is still working

  226. Are you able to take out a loan or withdrawal from Social Security like you can from Thrift Savings plan? Is there anyway to withdrawal from your Social Security benefits before age 59 1/2 without it being for disablility?

    • Hi Marty, Social Security does not make loans. The earliest age you can apply for reduced retirement benefits is 62. See our Retirement Planner for more information. Thanks!

  227. I haven’t received my retirement paperwork yet in the mail, with my overall lifetime earnings. This being said I need to look at the estimator page to get an idea, but I would still like to have my own copy of this for my records. Thanks, Cindy Schauf 670 Candy Avenue Reno Nevada 89509

  228. Hi,

    my date of birth is 02121957, am I elegible for to take a retirement ?

    thanks,

    sheela choudhuri

  229. If I retire at full retirement age of 66 in 2018, will I get an increase each year till I am receiving what I would get at age 70

    • Hello James, our Retirement Estimator is exactly the calculator you are looking for! It gives you future estimates of your monthly Social Security benefits based on your actual Social Security earnings record.
      In addition, we have a variety of other calculators to help you plan for the future. Which calculator you choose depends on what you want to do. Also, we suggest that you create a my Social Security account. With your personal my Social Security account, you can verify your earnings, get your Social Security Statement, and much more. We hope this helps!

  230. Pension ” Rs. 1,25,000/-
    F.D. Interest Rs. 10,00,000/-
    Bank Interest Rs. 16869/-
    Share (short term) Rs. 31884/-

    Deduction:

    PPF : rs. 1,50,000/-
    TDS collected Rs. 1,00,000/-

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