584 thoughts on “Our Online Benefits Application

  1. I turn 65 in October 2020. I’m not ready to retire but am wondering if I should sign up and delay receiving benefits until I actually physically stop working?

  2. I have forgotten my re-entry number and when I sign in to mysocialsecurity there is no re-entry number please help

  3. Sir,
    I am in a bad situation, I applied for my SS on 3/3/2020
    I was 66 on march 1st . I only needed 2 forms to complete
    my application Mr Russell gave me a envelope to return them in, I did this either the post office lost them or the SS
    office did, I had to get the forms again, this time I registered them, Mr Mills a supervisor signed for them on July 20, I have called and left messages. Mr Russell did call me one time I gave him the info and tracking number I
    called two weeks later and his supervisor Mrs Jackson was supposed to call me, I have called Mrs Jackson several times she has never returned my call. I have no other income I am a burden on my children for they take care of me. Could you please help me it would be so appreciated
    my email is Kathy.chaffin@gmail.com. the office I applied at is 10703 Stancliff Rd, Houston Tx. 77099
    Thank you so much
    Kathy A Chaffin

    • Hi Bonnie, thanks for using our blog to ask your question. We will always pay your own retirement benefit first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own retirement benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. However, the spouse’s benefit cannot exceed one-half of your husband’s full retirement amount (not his reduced benefit amount). So, you can only receive additional spouse’s benefits if your own full retirement benefit (not your reduced benefit) is less than half of your husband’s full retirement benefit.

      Generally, during the initial interview when applying for Social Security benefits, we typically explore all other benefits that could yield you a higher benefit amount. To find out if you are eligible for a higher benefit amount, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

  4. Maybe someone can help me to apply for retirement SS Your web site will not sign me up; it gives me all kind of excuses. No one will answer the phone, and i can’t find the mail in form through all the advertisements. Thank you John

    • Hi John, thanks for using our blog. We are sorry to hear about the difficulties you are experiencing. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

    • Hi, Nancy. If you work and are full retirement age or older, you may keep all of your benefits, no matter how much you earn. If you are younger than full retirement age, there is a limit to how much you can earn and still receive full Social Security benefits. If you are younger than full retirement age during all of 2020, we must deduct $1 from your benefits for each $2 you earn above $18,240. If you reach full retirement age during 2020, we must deduct $1 from your benefits for each $3 you earn above $48,600 until the month you reach full retirement age. Also, keep in mind, your payment amount is based on when you decide to start your benefits. If you choose to get benefits before full retirement age, they will be reduced. The amount you receive when you first get benefits sets the base for the amount you will receive for the rest of your life. Your benefits are reduced a fraction of a percent for each month before your full retirement age. For more information and examples of how this works, please see our publication, How Work Affects Your Benefits. When you are ready, you can complete the online application for Social Security retirement benefits in as little as 15 minutes. To get started, visit here. We hope this helps.

  5. I have questions regarding drawing my deceased husbands social security. Can I make an appointment by phone to ask my questions?

    • Hi Diana, thanks for using our blog. The amount of a widows benefit is based on several factors, including: the earnings of the person who died, when the deceased worker started receiving their benefits, your age at the time of your spouse’s death, and the amount of your own retirement benefit. We compare your own benefit with your potential survivor benefit. If your survivor benefit would be higher than your own current retirement benefit at the time of your spouse’s passing, you would be eligible for survivor benefits.

      Typically, a widow or widower at full (survivors) retirement age or older generally receives 100% of the deceased worker’s amount, a widow or widower under full retirement age receives about 71 to 99 percent of the worker’s benefit amount, and a widow or widower with a child younger than age 16 receives 75 percent of the worker’s benefit amount. For more information about how much your benefit would be, visit our Survivors Planner.

      If you have additional questions, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

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