Medicare

Sign up for Medicare Part B Online, by Fax or Mail

August 6, 2020 • By

Last Updated: August 6, 2020

For many people, signing up for Medicare Part B doesn’t require you to leave the comfort of home.  Please visit our Medicare Part B webpage if:

  1. You are already enrolled in Medicare Part A.
  2. You would like to enroll in Part B during the Special Enrollment Period.

You can complete form CMS-40B (Application for Enrollment in Medicare – Part B [Medical Insurance]) and CMS-L564 (Request for Employment Information) online.

You can also fax the CMS-40B and CMS-L564 to 1-833-914-2016; or return forms by mail to your local Social Security office.  Please contact Social Security at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) if you have any questions.  

 Note:  When completing the forms:

  • State, “I want Part B coverage to begin (MM/YY)” in the remarks section of the CMS-40B form or online application.
  • If your employer is unable to complete Section B, please complete that portion as best you can on behalf of your employer without your employer’s signature.
  • Submit one of the following types of secondary evidence by uploading it from a saved document on your computer:
    • Income tax returns that show health insurance premiums paid.
    • W-2s reflecting pre-tax medical contributions.
    • Pay stubs that reflect health insurance premium deductions.
    • Health insurance cards with a policy effective date.
    • Explanations of benefits paid by the GHP or LGHP.
    • Statements or receipts that reflect payment of health insurance premiums.

 Please let your friends and loved ones know about this online, mail, or fax option.

 


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About the Author

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Comments

  1. Joy C.

    How do I submit the Medicare Part B application ON-LINE?

  2. Tom g.

    I file all paper work for Part B over 60 days ago. still haven`t got a reply…..

  3. Tam t.

    Dear Gentlemen.
    My name is Tam Tran Thi. My SS# 256351248. When I applied for my Social security benefits, the worker at the SS office, who told me my monthly payment will be $1,059,after I paid for Medicare part B $144/month. Actually, I am getting $900/month only. In this case what I should do . Please help

    • BETTY G.

      NEVER show your social security on a PUBLIC FORUM; give it to them PRIVATELY
      ***************

      anyone needing supplemental health insurance,
      check into HUMANA PPO, etc.
      i pay only $59/month!!
      *************************

      i have tier 1 meds costing me ZERO !!!
      for your info info.

      betty gordon, iowa

  4. Shahnaaz A.

    Hello. SS office. I am getting hard time to sign in ss Account. When I need to talk to Agent Have to wait hrs . They dont liston our concern or talk nice & don’t liston get mad on me. I lost user name password too. Plz reply thanks.

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Shahnaaz, thanks for using our blog. We are sorry to hear about the difficulties you are experiencing with my Social Security. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page for details on how to retrieve or change your username or password. Hopefully this will help!

  5. Gloria M.

    SS already signed me up for Part A and B automatically.?
    This email is confusing.

  6. Sandra W.

    I receive SSI should I be enrolled in Medicare?

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Sandra, thanks for using our blog. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page for details on who can get Medicare. If you feel that you are eligible, please call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

  7. Tom D.

    If I am already receiving benefits for 62 and over does social security automatically enroll you in part b before my 65th birthday

    • Walt

      Yes!!! You’ll automatically get a Medicare card before your 65th birthday

    • Prc

      Not automatically, you have to tell the you want part B and then pay for it.

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Tom, thank you for using our blog. If you already get Social Security benefits, we’ll automatically enroll you in Medicare Hospital Insurance (Part A) and Medical Insurance (Part B). We’ll mail you all the information you need a few months before you become eligible. Note: Residents of Puerto Rico or foreign countries won’t automatically receive Part B. They must elect this benefit.

      Because you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you can turn it down. However, if you decide to sign up for Part B later, your coverage can be delayed and you may have to pay a late enrollment penalty for as long as you have Part B coverage. Your monthly premium will go up 10 percent for each 12-month period you were eligible for Part B, but didn’t sign up for it unless you qualify for a special enrollment period.

  8. linda f.

    I’m a 70 year retired female. I did not sign up for part b when i was 65. what would it cost to sign up for part b now. I have health insurance on my husbands policy with compass rose. He is a retired 86 yr old from the federal govt. he does not have part b either. we both have part a.

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Linda, thanks for using our blog. In most cases, if you don’t sign up for Medicare when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a higher monthly premium which is why we advise people to apply for Medicare benefits as soon as they are eligible. However, as a federal retiree, you may want to check with the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) for details. We hope this helps!

  9. Debbie S.

    If I want to get part B but I have been on Medicare for about 4 years will there be a penalty for not taking it out at the beginning?

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Debbie, thanks for using our blog. In most cases, if you don’t sign up for Medicare when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a higher monthly premium which is why we advise people to apply for Medicare benefits as soon as they are eligible. However, if you were covered under a group health plan based on your or your spouse’s current employment, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) that will let you sign up for Medicare Part B. You have an 8-month SEP to sign up for Part A and/or Part B that starts at one of these times (whichever happens first):
      • The month after the employment ends
      • The month after group health plan insurance based on current employment ends.

      Usually, you don’t pay a late enrollment penalty if you sign up during a SEP.

      If you don’t qualify for an SEP, you will have to wait for the General Enrollment Period (GEP) to sign up. The GEP lasts from January 1 through March 31. Coverage would begin July 1. Most people who sign up for Part B during the GEP will have a 10 percent increase in monthly premiums for each 12-month period they did not enroll, but were eligible.

      You can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      • Debbie S.

        Thank you!

  10. Hugh S.

    I am 76 years old and work full-time. Social security deductions are deducted from my paycheck every two weeks. I been on Social security since I was 68. Is there anyway my monthly Social security payments can be increased?

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Hugh, thanks for using our blog to ask your question. Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement benefits, your monthly benefit amount may increase. As long as you continue to work and receive benefits, we will check your record every year to see whether the additional earnings will increase your monthly benefit. If there is an increase, we will send you a letter telling you of your new benefit amount. We hope this helps!

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