40 thoughts on “Hit a Homerun with Social Security

  1. I am in no way prepared for retirement. Any assistance with this matter will be greatly appreciated.

    Sincerely,
    Katherine W.

    • Hi Katherine. Our Retirement Planner provides detailed information about your Social Security retirement benefits. It also points out things you may want to consider as you prepare for the future. General information about our programs and services is conveniently available anytime at our website. You can also create a my Social Security account. With your personal my Social Security account, you can verify your earnings, get your Social Security Statement, and much more. We hope this helps!

      • if you ever need disibilty have atleast 50,000 or more in bank before appling because after 2 and half years and dead broke you might get close my advice when you start working refuse to pay in and keep your money in bank. remember refuse to pay social security

  2. Is it possible to set up a “My Social Security” account to look at earnings and retirement information and still continue to receive SS statement and benefit letters by mail?

    • Hi Erma. Our online services allow you to do business with us from the comfort of your home at your convenience. With instant access to your Social Security Statement at any time, you will no longer receive one periodically in the mail. In addition to getting a benefit verification letter online, with your personal my Social Security account, you will find that you can do a lot more, helping us save money and the environment. Thank you for Going Green!

  3. I am going to be 61 years old next month and live on SSDI. I go on Medicare 8/1/17 which will cause my insurance to go up $50 a month and I skip taking the 15 or around there pills I have to take daily in order to stretch them out. I live modestly in senior/disability housing and my vehicle is 14 years What do I have to look forward to when I turn 65? My SSI will go down about $500 making things that much worse. So I can’t save a dime when I’m scratching for change to buy necessities. Do you have any suggestions?

    • Once your SS starts your SSI will go down that amount less $20.00. In other words you gain $20.00. If you are still eligible for some SSI then the State public Assistance Office will arrange for the State to pick up your Medicare premium. and you’ll still be on MEDICAID.so you won’t have to skip on your pills. By the way you should not be skipping on them now, MEDICAID shouldcover that cost.

    • Nancy, talk to someone about Humana PPO health insurance. I’ve been very happy having them for the last 4 to 6 years.

      Presently I pay $51 a month and the insurance company gets around $100 that Social security pays Medicare. So it totals around $151 a month but only $51 a month out of our pocket.

      Many prescription drugs are on tier one and are free.

      So Humana PPO is your health insurance/Medicare together as one.

      A year ago I had knee replacement surgery costI got $42,000. I paid out-of-pocket $1200; quite a deal.

      When my husband was living he and I were paying 1200 a month for Blue Cross shield. They went up another $500 a month just too 1700 a month. Ridiculous.

      I went looking and found this at that time per $31 a month! Look at the thousands of dollars I saved that year alone with the tax person couldn’t believe it either

      Hope this info helps you on your decision making. From this Iowan. 😉

    • Hi Nancy, Medicare enrollees who have limited income and resources may get help paying for their premiums and out-of-pocket medical expenses from Medicaid. Also, you may want to check and see if you are eligible to receive social services from the state in which you live. These services include Medicaid, which may help pay for medication that Medicare does not cover. Please call the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services at 1-800-633-4227 or your State Medical Assistance Office for more information. Thanks.

  4. I am 81 years old, my wife is a retired LPN and she takes care of me as I am partial disabled. I have edema in both of my lower legs and use a walker to get around. She doctors my lower legs with a lotion twice a day, I have too much trouble reaching low. If she could not do this I would not be able to doctor them. We live at our home. She is 70 years of age and is not disabled and does household chores. We are both on SSI. Can SS pay her for this? dukejake@midrivers.com

    • There is no provision in the Social Security Act to provide benefits for caregivers of the aged or disabled. However, you may want to contact your Social Services or Welfare department to determine if there are any locally sponsored programs that might provide assistance. Medicare also provides information for caregivers. They may also be able to provide you with the names of organizations that might help, such as the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration on Aging.

  5. My wife is my caretaker. Can she be paid SS for this? She does all household chores and drives to store and does errands. She drives me to the doctor. I am 81 yrs old, She is 70 years old.

    • My wife is my caretaker, can she be paid SS for this? She does all household chores and drives to the store and does other chores for me. We are married and both live on SS.

    • There is no provision in the Social Security Act to provide benefits for caregivers of the aged or disabled. However, you may want to contact your Social Services or Welfare department to determine if there are any locally sponsored programs that might provide assistance. They may also be able to provide you with the names of organizations that might help.

      You may also find help through the following Web sites:

      “Senior Citizens’ Resources” at: http://www.usa.gov.edgesuite-staging.net/Citizen/Topics/Health/caregivers.shtml

      Benefits.gov using:
      http://www.benefits.gov
      and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Administration on Aging at:

      http://www.aoa.gov/
      Medicare also provides information for caregivers at
      ttp://www.medicare.gov/campaigns/caregiver/caregiver.html

    • Thank you for your question Mr. Umber. You and your wife may be eligible to receive additional assistance from the state where you live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. You can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services office. You can also visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) web page for more information. We hope this helps.

  6. I am 61 and still living in my 22 year old car. I had a very bad stroke 9 years ago. The only thing that has not happened to me is I have not been raped….YET
    I get SSD, medicare. Thats it. The county of Bucks,Pa has the worst system that I ever had to deal with. I am paralyzed on my right side. Cant afford to see a doctor for my knocked out teeth ( 14 or more beat out of me ), eyes ( going far sighted ), leg brace (mine is 8 years old has to be taped on ), Groin is ripped and gut pops out ( got that while in a shelter where we all had a mega cough ) COME TO THINK ABOUT IT, can you recommend a lawyer?

  7. hi
    I receive a foreign supplement. my wife is retired but not a u.s citizen is my wife entitled to any payments.

    • Hi Charles. Generally, individuals that are lawfully in the United States and meet all other eligibility requirements can receive Social Security benefits. Unfortunately and because of security reasons we do not have access to personal records in this blog and cannot answer your question at this time. We probably need more information related to your “foreign supplement”, and how this could impact benefits for your wife. One of our representatives should be able to provide you and your wife with an explanation and answer specific questions about this matter. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. or contact your local Social Security office directly. Thanks.

  8. I Charles my suggestion is that legaly in this country if your is permanent Legal documents.she’s possible qualify for benefits in your corverege status.because she’s your wife legaly.

  9. My neighbor, who is in her 70’s, thinks that she cannot collect SS on her ex-spouse’s work record because her ex remarried. She was married to him for 25 years and he was the higher wage earner. My neighbor started collecting her SS at age 62 and that would make a difference as to how much, if any, she would receive. I think that back when she began to collect SS it was when you could collect separately, and now you must collect on your own work record and your ex-spouses at the same time. But, her spouse remarrying would not prevent her from collecting on his work record, if there’s anything to collect, is this correct? Thank you

    • Many spouses do not understand that they can collect on their ex-husband’s earning record even if he has re-married, provided they were married for at least 10 years. She should try first to contact SSA by phone. She will probably have to arrange to go to a SSA office, and take her marriage certification, and divorce certification.

    • If you are divorced, but your marriage lasted 10 years or longer, you can receive benefits on your ex-spouse’s record even if they have remarried. Generally, during the initial interview to apply for Social Security benefits, we typically explore other possible eligibility that could result in a higher benefit amount for the applicant. Keep in mind that if someone is eligible for retirement benefits on their own record and divorced spouse’s benefits, we will pay the retirement benefit first. If the benefit on the ex-spouse’s record is higher, then the individual will get an additional amount on the ex-spouse’s record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount.
      To find out if she is eligible for a higher benefit, your neighbor can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Or she can visit the local Social security office. Thanks.

  10. I applied for SSDI 2015 and SSI 2016. My SSI was not approved within 120days because it was attached to my appeal for SSDI. My hearing/appeal was postponed in May 2017. Next hearing Date TBA. . I’m in dire need for help. Is there anyway my SSI can be reviewed separately by a case manager so I can get the help I need while waiting for another hearing date.

    • Hi! As part of the Disability Determination Process, our field offices are responsible for verifying non-medical eligibility requirements. A favorable medical determination must be made in order to begin paying disability benefits. Individuals waiting for a medical determination on their disability claim, may be eligible to receive social services from the state in which they live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. You can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services office. Or you can visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) web page for more information. In your situation, please continue working with your local Social Security office or the hearing office handling your claim. Thanks.

  11. USPS v. OPM

    A. The United States Postal Service, also known as the Post Office, U.S. Mail, or Postal Service, often abbreviated as USPS, is an independent agency of the United States federal government responsible for providing postal service in the United States. Benjamin Franklin was appointed our first Postmaster General in 1775. The Postal Reorganization Act of 1970, Public Law 91–375, converted the Post Office Department into the U.S. Postal Service (Postal Service), an independent establishment within the executive branch. The Postal Service commenced operations July 1, 1971. This agency is charged with providing patrons with reliable mail service at reasonable rates and fees. The Postal Regulatory Commission is an independent agency that has exercised regulatory oversight over the U.S. Postal Service since its creation by the Postal Reorganization Act of 1970. The Postal Service is governed by an 11-member Board of Governors, including nine Governors appointed by the President, a Postmaster General who is selected by the Governors, and a Deputy Postmaster General who is selected by the Governors and the Postmaster General. The USPS employed 617,254 workers (as of February 2015) and operated 211,264 vehicles in 2014. The USPS is the third largest employer in the nation after the federal government and Walmart. The USPS is the operator of the largest civilian vehicle fleet in the world. On a typical day, more than 600,000 men and women of the United States Postal Service ensure that hundreds of millions of pieces of mail are delivered to 156 million delivery points, including more than 43 million rural businesses and residences across the country. FY2016 had total revenue of $71.5 billion and total expenses of $77.1 billion, resulting in a net loss of $5.6 billion, nearly exactly equal to the legal mandate in the Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits Fund (PSRHBF) pre-funding expense. USPS had a good year FY 16. The 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (P.L. 109–435) that must be repealed by final decision of a competent federal official, reduced the Postal Services’ $601 million to $2.7 billion FY 16 surplus, with which to pay $55 billion in debt, to a “controlling income”. OMB however concocted a scheme to profit from the USPS without decisively repealing PSRHBF and is causing criminal damage to unlawfully dictate an enormous employee and consequential revenue cut FY 18. The USPS has not directly received taxpayer-dollars since the early 1980s. Since the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act of 2006 (P.L. 109–435) robbed the postal service $5.5 billion for retiree health insurance contributions it has cut its expenses by $15 billion annually, but first-class mail volume has continued to drop and debt, termed net deficiency, has risen to $55.9 billion FY 16 and increases at around $5.5 billion annually. with a first Annual Report that must train its cannons on abolishing and being refunded the entire amount deposited in the Retiree Health Benefit Fund.

    1. On November 6, 2013 the New York Times reported; Last year, the Postal Service’s operating revenue was $65 billion, but its operating expenses were $81 billion = $16 billion deficit in 2012. A net loss of $41 billion is reported between 2007-12. The post office has seen revenue for first-class mail — the agency’s cash cow — decline by $2.4 billion. It has defaulted on three annual $5.5 billion payments into a health care fund for its future retirees. It has also exhausted its $15 billion borrowing limit from the Treasury Department. It has defaulted on three annual $5.5 billion payments into a health care fund for its future retirees. It has also exhausted its $15 billion borrowing limit from the Treasury Department. On November 15, 2013 the L.A. Time wrote; The USPS reported a $5 billion loss FY2013. It’s the seventh-straight yearly net loss. Since 2006, the agency has cut its expenses by $15 billion annually, but first-class mail volume has continued to drop. While package and standard mail volumes increased, the agency’s most profitable product, first-class mail, declined by 2.8 billion pieces. The USPS FY 2016 Annual report to Congress: FY2016 Annual Performance Report and FY2017 Performance Plan FY2016 Comprehensive Statement on Postal Operations declares an incurable $5.5 billion deficit. This report satisfies the public reporting requirements contained under 39USC§2401(e), § 2402, §2803 and §2804, along with the Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (PAEA) of 2006 Section 3652. In 2017 OMB Independent Agencies FY 18 Pgs. 1206-1208 cooked the books to attempt to extort on-budget revenues from an imaginary profits of one of those decadent ten year plans doomed to failure, although they admit, in writing, without proving it in the balance sheet, the Postal Service will have an annual operating deficit of $4.7 billion in 2018 and more than $5 billion in each subsequent year through 2027. For their part, the Postal Service states they had a remarkable 2016, delivering over 154 billion pieces of mail, growing revenue to $71.5 billion in FY16—a 3.7 percent revenue increase, these results helped achieve controllable income of $610 million, excluding the impact of a $5.8 billion mandated Retiree Health Benefits prepayment, the Postal Service would have recorded net income for the year. USPS must continue to produce an annual fiscal year report to congress, every year. The USPS Annual Report must make future estimates, so the USPS is not abused by OMB’s fraudulent relationship with OPM outlays and the waste caused by the disastrous Retiree Health Benefit program is redressed.

    B. Since 1971, there have been several Postal reforms. Notably, the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 (P.L. 101–239) moved the Postal Service “off-budget” so that, beginning in 1990, the receipts and disbursements of the Fund are not considered within the on-budget net spending totals, although they ostensibly included within the unified spending and deficit totals, but are not and should not be. More recently, the OPM owes the Postal Service and employees compensation for the disastrous 2006 Postal Accountability and Enhancement Act (P.L. 109–435) that created the Postal Service Retiree Health Benefits Fund to put the Postal Service on a path that fully funds its substantial retiree (annuitant) health benefits liabilities. Since the Act’s passage in 2006, the Postal Service contributed over $50 billion to the Retiree Health Benefits Fund but has defaulted on $34 billion in total required payments since FY 2012. Beginning in 2017, the Act also requires the Postal Service to begin a 27-year amortization to retire its unfunded liability under CSRS by paying for “actuarial costs of the unfunded liability for post-retirement health costs of current employees” = zero benefits. OPM must reimburse the Postal Service Retiree Health Fund to pay off the >$55.9 USPS debt FY 17.

    C. The Office of Personnel Management (OPM) is responsible for the administration of the Federal Retirement Program covering over 2.7 million active employees and 2.5 million annuitants. Office of Personnel Management (OPM) receives “such sums as necessary” mandatory appropriations for payments from the General Fund to the Civil Service Retirement and Disability Fund, the Employees Health Benefits Fund, and the Employees Group Life Insurance Fund. The Government’s share of the cost of health insurance for annuitants are defined in sections 5USC§8901 and §8906; and the Government’s contribution for payment of administrative expenses incurred by OPM in administration of the Retired Federal Employees Health Benefits Act of 1960. OMB must report total OPM outlays by adding FY 17 Budget pages 230-232 plus administrative costs on page 1. FY17 Agreement between OPM and OMB regarding $50.9 billion FY 2017 outlays in the historical tables would reduce the deficit by $45.2 billion without costing the taxpayers anything and must in fact be historically revised to reduce the debt. OPM assets were nearly exactly $1 trillion, $1,003.7 million FY 15.

    B. When Congress passed the Postal Accountability and Enhancement PAE Act, which mandated $5.5 billion per year to be paid into an account to fully pre-fund employee retirement health benefits, a requirement exceeding that of other government and private organization, revenue dropped sharply due to recession-influence declining mail volume prompting the postal service to look to other sources of revenue while cutting costs to reduce its budget deficit. The postal service has defaulted on this $5.5 billion obligation since 2007. The federal government has paid $0 in benefits from the Postal Service Retiree Health Fund which has a balance of more than $61.3 billion and zero outlays FY 17. OPM must disgorge these funds to offset the USPS deficit, as the first of several compensation settlements for extortionate health care legislation, or to a General Fund that subsidizes the USPS operating deficit.

  12. Is this true that the Trump administration is working on a plan to take apart our SS & Medicare? I’ve been working on a plan for my future income and SS will be the bulk of my money to buy Medicare and pay bills. Thank you

    • Hi Ana. On May 23, the President released his FY 2018 budget request to Congress for their consideration. Currently, there have been no changes to the Social Security programs. For more information about the President’s Budget for SSA, please go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/budget/. Thanks!

    • Trump’s budget eliminates SSDI. That’s Social Security Disability Insurance for workers too young to retire but whose total & permanent disability rendered them unable ever to work again, at any occupation. people who paid into Social Security all their working lives. Trump, and Congress, believe disabled people are just “too lazy to work” and therefore not entitled to Social Security benefits. SSDI does have the “Ticket to Work program for those who’d like to TRY working without losing benefits in case they fail in their attempt to work, but Trump & Congress are eliminating that program, too. Their position is “get a job, losers.” Nice. Social Security retirement is safe, for now anyway. But not Medicare. Paul Ryan wants to eliminate that too, by handing us a set amount per month to buy health insurance on the open market. It won’t be much, and we all know with the Obamacare subsidies amd orotections hone for pre-existing conditions, we’ll never be able to afford health insurance. That’s why Medicare was put in place ti begim with, because the elderly & disabled could NOT buy it! He and Congress and Trump do not care about elderly or disabled people – or anybody else, unless they’re the wealthy backers who pit them where they are. THAT is the reality. Go to Congress.gov and read the bills they’re introducing, passing, and repealing EVERY DAY while we’re all to busy getting outraged over Trump’s insane Twitter rants. The nefarious dealings of Congress are online with fill text of the bills and record of who votes for yhem, at least until they figure out that we can see what they’re up to, then they’ll take the site down, like they’ve done with every other government website that gave the people factual information about the government, science, benefits, and anything else meant for us. This is all true, I can list the websites they took down already, starting the day of the inauguration.

      Now they’ve even called for a new Constitutional Convention – to scrap our existing Constitution and write another – which I’m quite certain will NOT contain the Bill of Rights, nor any checks and balances on their power, either. I wish this were not true, but unfortunately, it is horrifyingly so. They’ve got all but 2 states on board for this now, and once they have that, we’re done permanently, with no recourse, no going back. Most state legislatures are Republican dominated, alas, so I’m not hopeful. so I’m glad I’m old and sick and going to die sooner than later. I don’t want to be around for the end they have planned for this once great country and our magnificent Constitution.

      • The Administration’s fiscal year 2018 budget was recently submitted to Congress for consideration. Currently, there have been no changes to the Social Security programs. For more information about the President’s Budget for SSA, please go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov/budget/.

  13. I read commentaries that seem to indicate that I may not be receiving all of the benefits of Social Security that I can or should be receiving. How do I investigate to find out what benefits I may be lacking?

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