57 thoughts on “Women need to understand their Social Security benefit…but that’s not all!

  1. I’m getting my social security disability check will I get a retirement benefit check also.Yours Truly,Ms.L.Price

    • When they switched me over from disability payments to retirement at retirement age, it was the same exact amount … just the same check amount. They did, however, mess me up with my Medicare. For some reason, they changed my Medicare account, too, or, at least, that’s what they said happened. My bills were refused by Medicare for a month or two and had to be re-filed later. Just keep an eye out for what is happening.

      • same with me; you get a letter advising you are no longer received SSDI benefits.

        you are now of age for retirement … SAME $$.

    • at 65 your disability will switch over to social security. your check will not change, you will get the same amount.

    • No, disability SS is early Social Security at the rate you would get at 65, 66 or 67. Depending on your year of birth. Only other supplement you get maybe SSI depending on how much income you get monthly/yearly. Retirement benefit is for those with no disability.

  2. Look into maximum amounts social security allows per household. It only allows you to receive so much. I don’t know if it pertains to your situation but I got much less than my full disability amount once I began receiving other benefits.

  3. How come clerks not abreast of “offset’ for government retirees? Both NJ &FL cannot give me answers. My husband just passed, he had state pension and social security. I have government pension and social security with offset (I receive $84 social security after Part B paid. Will I now receive something from my husband? One woman said yes and no offset. Is this true? Husband passed Jan. 25, haven’t heard anything back from them.

    • Call the toll free number 1800-772 1213. This blog provides general information and does not give advice for individual situations.

    • Hi, Phyllis. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies, such as police officers and some teachers) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Your benefit can be reduced based on one of two provisions: The Government Pension Offset and the Windfall Elimination Provision. To learn more, please visit our webpage, Information for Government Employees. For your security, we do not have access to information about your account. We do ask that members in our Blog community continue to work with our local offices with questions about their specific case. Thanks.

    • We are sorry to hear about your loss Phyllis. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Your benefits can be reduced based on one of two provisions. Your own Social Security benefit can be reduced based on the Windfall Elimination Provision. Your widow’s benefits under Social Security may be affected by the Government Pension Offset. You should receive an official notice soon. For follow up and further assistance, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives at our toll free number are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  4. Hi,
    I have not got any social security benefits niether from Florida State and nor from Taxas Workfoce Commission,it is really a misserable because life is not mooving without money.kindly do for me.
    sincerely you

    • Hi! If you are referring to a claim for Social Security benefits, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, for follow up and further assistance. Representatives at our toll free number are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks.

  5. I am currently receiving SS Disability benefits and need to know if I am required to apply for regular SS benefits, and if so what age would I apply for and would my benefits change when I reach age 62 or 65? Or does this happen at a certain age without me applying. Also, will my benefits be reduced at that time? Thank you.

    • Hi, Carol. Thanks for your questions. Social Security disability benefits paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, automatically convert to retirement benefits when individuals attain their Full Retirement Age. Full retirement age (also called “normal retirement age”) had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same when we convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits. Disability (SSDI) payments are established at the highest rate possible, based on your earnings record. We hope you find this helpful.

  6. Many people do not know how retirement from social security works, they need to educate themselves and take care of their own needs, we as women put the burden on other people shoulders because we are care givers and expect someone else to take care of our financial needs when we get older. Wake up!!! when it comes to money you are on your own.

    • Not true. I am a strong woman and I do not expect anyone else, especially the government, to take care of my financial needs. You can be a care giver and take care of yourself.

  7. WHEN YOU REACH 65 YOU WILL BE SWITCHED OVER TO SOCIAL SECURITY. YOU WILL NOT HAVE TO DO ANYTHING, YOUR BENEFITS WILL REMAIN THE SAME.

    • Social Security disability benefits paid under the Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) program, automatically convert to retirement benefits when individuals attain their Full Retirement Age. Full retirement age (also called “normal retirement age”) had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959. Generally, the benefit amount remains the same when we convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits. Disability (SSDI) payments are established at the highest rate possible, based on the individual’s earnings record.

  8. My question is why has social security notcher able release disability funds that were paid by employees and employers.? Once a worker becomes disabled they have a right to request their assistance as needed It should not be left up to states’ or politicians to decide if they should be able to do so.

  9. Are divorced women able to file a restricted application on their ex husbands social security at full retirement age and keep working until age 70 when they can switch to their own social security?

    • Hi Shirley, if you turn 62 before January 2, 2016, deemed filing rules will not apply if you file at full retirement age or later. This means that you may file for either your spouse’s (divorced spouse)benefit or your retirement benefit without being required or “deemed” to file for the other. In this case, you may also restrict your application to apply only for spouse’s (divorced spouse) benefits and delay filing for your own retirement in order to earn delayed retirement credits. However, if you turn age 62 on or after January 2, 2016, you are required or “deemed” to file for both your own retirement and for any benefits you are due as a spouse, no matter what age you are.

  10. The duties of social security administration officials and the importance of social security administration in should be taught tin high school so that both men and women know how they are affected by this great government organization.
    Also SSA should recruit and train people who can be relied upon in providing excellent service to the people. As a of now some SSA officials don’t understand the rules, consequently, they deprive citizens of their benefits. Just recently auditors discovered that beneficiaries were wrongly deprived of their entitlements by SSA officials. Even when you correct these officials, they hold tenacious to their wrong decisions without caring a hoot about your losses simply because they know that you are ignorant of their rules and operations.

    • Can i receive part of my husbands social security if we are both retired he is 71 and i am 73 his benefits are twice as much as mine

      • Hello Margaret. Generally, during your initial interview, when you apply for Social Security benefits, we typically explore other possible eligibility that could yield you a higher benefit amount.
        There are factors to consider. First, your spouse’s benefit can be equal to one-half of your husband’s full retirement amount -only- if you start receiving benefits at your full retirement age.
        Then, if a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. Finally, when you’re eligible and qualify for your own retirement benefits and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay your own benefits first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own retirement benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit.
        To find out if you are eligible for a higher benefit, contact us at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter waiting time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Thanks!

  11. I AM TURNING 65 in july 03,2017,i am already receiving social security,will the amount of my check increase at that time?

  12. As a long term homemaker, now divorced– when my Disability benefit automatically became my SS benefit I was not given the option of claiming my husbands SS benefit. Is this something I needed to apply for?

    • Thank you for your question. Thanks for your question. Here are the requirements to receive benefits if you are divorced:
      • You are unmarried;
      • You are age 62 or older;
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work. This means that if you are eligible for retirement benefits on your own record, we will pay that amount first. If the benefit on your spouse’s record is higher, you will get an additional amount on that record so that the combination of benefits equals that higher amount. For more information, check out our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced webpage.

      We recommend that you read our publication, “What Every Woman Should Know” for more important information. Thanks!

  13. If when applying for Soc. Sec Disability I was divorced, denied 2 x, then approved 12 months later by then I had remarried for about 3 months should I have been paid as divorced at the time ?????

    • Hi, thanks for your question. To be eligible for divorced spouse benefits, you had to be married to your former spouse for at least 10 years, be age 62 or older and you cannot be eligible for a higher benefit on your own record. For more information on how to qualify for divorced spouse benefits, visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced webpage. If you have specific questions, you can call our toll-free number 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778). Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Or contact your local office directly.

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  15. I applied for widow benefits in August 2016 and was told I would start receiving check in November 2016. I received letter January 1st, 2017 that they could not pay me at this time. What happened? How can I start receiving my checks. I am 62 years old and soon to be 63.

    • Hi Mary. Unfortunately, your question is a bit more complex than we can address in this blog. We urge you to call us at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. to speak to one of our representatives. Generally, you’ll have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Or, you can contact your local Social Security office directly. Thanks.

  16. Everything that you wrote in this column applies to men just as much as it applies to women. I’m a man, but if I were a woman, I’d be insulted by the condescending tone of this blog post. Everything about this blog post infers that women are intellectually inferior to men which, of course, is not true.

  17. Why is it that my husbands ex wife ho never, ever, in her entire life worked one hour, or contributed to SS with $1 (in her life) and finally divorced him 15 years ago, is now, after he (my husband), gave her two houses, for her to live in one, and rent the other house as to receive an income for the rest of her life, without still working, and she in now waiting for him to retire at age 67 and expects that the SS will pay her a retirement amount based on her ex husbands retirement amount (after 15 years divorced), while he, my husband had to start all over again and is currently paying a mortgage were he owes more than 90% of the house value, and I his wife for 20 years need to continue working until 67 to receive maybe the same amount than his ex wife who never worked, who received 2 houses, and now is seeking for SS retirement income. Isn’t that gross? Unethically disturbing? Unfair above all logic?
    I would understand if the poor ex wife was left with nothing and is sick therefore could not work to wait 20 years until his ex husband retires and then she could receive something, but if she is golfing, and playing tennis, and going to the beach all day, not counting her extensive travels overseas, why on earth then has the SS to pay his ex wife nothing, while by the other hand SS constantly claims that there is no money left for the next 20 years for the truly workers?
    Somebody needs to explain this to me.!!! Thank you,

  18. My wife is older than I by almost 2 years. She would like to retire soon. If she retires and files for S.S., can she draw her S.S. then reestablish her S.S. after I file and start to withdraw?

  19. i am sixty five and remarried two yrs ago, my husband is 59 not yet retired. I took my social security in 2017 , can I draw my present husband social security even though he is not retired yet? deb

    • Hello Charles, your wife may be able to get benefits if she is at least 62 years of age and you are receiving or eligible for retirement or disability benefits. Your spouse can also qualify for Medicare at age 65. See our Benefits Planner for more.

  20. I need to know if my ex-husbands benefits are more than mine. I have never remarried and I was thinking of trying to get a higher benefit than I get now! Is this possible?

  21. I am needing to know if I would qualify for any benefits since my husband is on disability. I am working full time.

    • Hello Susan, you may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits if you are at least 62 years of age and your spouse is receiving retirement or disability benefits. You can still work while you receive Social Security benefits. However, if you are younger than full retirement age and make more than the yearly earnings limit, your earnings may reduce your benefit amount. Visit our Benefits Planner: Getting Benefits While Working for more information. Thanks!

  22. wife of 35 years. Multiple sclerosis so I’m unable to work receiving disability. Very small $$. Can I collect of from my husbands social security? ???
    I am 56 he is 60.
    He is Currently unemployed desperately searching for a job. AGE DISCRIMINATION (in his field. )

    Thank u.

    • Thank you for your question, Pamela. You may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits if you are at least 62 years of age and your spouse is receiving retirement or disability benefits.
      The earliest age a person can apply for their (reduced) retirement benefits is 62.

  23. im turning 62 in January. can I draw on previous husband benefits since he made more money than my current husband?
    what do I need to do to be started on my benefits?

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