Three Common Ways Your Social Security Payment Can Grow After Retirement

woman planting flowers You made the choice and now you are happily retired. You filed online for your Social Security benefits. They arrive each month in the correct amount exactly as expected. But, did you ever wonder if your Social Security check could increase?

Once you begin receiving benefits, there are three common ways benefit checks can increase: a cost of living adjustment (COLA); additional work; or an adjustment at full retirement age if you received reduced benefits and exceeded the earnings limit.

The COLA is the most commonly known increase for Social Security payments. We annually announce a COLA, and there’s usually an increase in the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit amount people receive each month. By law, federal benefit rates increase when the cost of living rises, as measured by the Department of Labor’s Consumer Price Index (CPI-W). More than 66 million Americans saw a 2.0 percent increase in their Social Security and SSI benefits in 2018. For more information on the 2018 COLA, visit our website.

Social Security uses your highest thirty-five years of earnings to figure your benefit amount when you sign up for benefits. If you work after you begin receiving benefits, your additional earnings may increase your payment. If you had fewer than 35 years of earnings when we figured your benefit, you will replace a zero earnings year with new earnings. If you had 35 years or more, we will check to see if your new year of earnings is higher than the lowest of the 35 years (after considering indexing). We check additional earnings each year you work while receiving Social Security. If an increase is due, we send a notice and pay a one-time check for the increase and your continuing payment will be higher.

Maybe you chose to receive reduced Social Security retirement benefits while continuing to work. You made the choice to take benefits early, but at a reduced rate. If you exceeded the allowable earnings limit and had some of your benefits withheld, we will adjust your benefit once you reach full retirement age. We will refigure your payment to credit you for any months you did not receive payments.  Your monthly benefit will increase based on the crediting months you receive. You can find additional information about working and your benefit by reading What You Need to Know When You Get Retirement or Survivors Benefits.

Retirement just got more interesting since you learned about potential increases to monthly payments. Social Security has been securing your today and tomorrow for more than 80 years with information and tools to help you achieve a successful retirement.

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190 thoughts on “Three Common Ways Your Social Security Payment Can Grow After Retirement

  1. THANK YOU FOR THIS INFORMATION. IT REALLY HELPS. I AM ABOUT TO APPLY FOR RETIREMENT AND I HAVE ONLY ONE QUESTION. IF I APPLY IN JULY AND MY FIRST CHECK IS NOT UNTIL OCTOBER WILL IT REFLECT THE $AMOUNT DUE FROM JULY OR OCTOBER?

    • Hello William, if you apply in July but your first month of eligibility is October or if you selected the month of October as your first month of entitlement, your benefit amount will reflect the amount for the month of October. Please keep in mind that benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, for instance, if you want your benefits to begin with the month of October, you will receive your first benefit payment in November. Please visit our Social Security Retirement Planner for more information.
      Thanks!

  2. I had NO earned income in 2016. Also, you have STILL not paid me my March 2018 benefits of $897. Please wire it to my Chase Ucard IMMEDIATELY! Your failure to pay it yet has put me into a severe hardship, crisis, emergency, which is a crime!! Richard L. Harrison,

  3. I was not working when I started Social Security at 62 because I had had to care for my dying mother since my age of 59. After a few years, I went back to work again at age 68 and continued until I was 89. Was any of that extra work gaining me any larger check from Social Security?

    • Hello Patricia. When you apply for retirement benefits, we base your benefit payment on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits.
      Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that were used to compute your retirement benefit, then we recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically. We hope this information helps!

    • Hi Loretta. Generally, disability benefits (SSDI) are established at the highest rate possible based on your earnings prior to you becoming disabled. Social Security disability benefits automatically change to retirement benefits when disability beneficiaries attain their full retirement age. Benefits are not interrupted with this transition and the benefit amount will generally remains the same. Thanks!

  4. My husband took social security benefits at age 62 and then decided to go back to work at 64 and worked for 6 1/2 years, full time. can he get increased benefits for working that long?

    • Thank you for your question, Cecily. When a person applies for retirement benefits, we base their benefit payment on the highest 35 years of their earnings and their age when they start receiving benefits. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase their monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that were used to compute your retirement benefit, then we recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically.

  5. COLA? Seriously? That’s YOUR explanation of how the benefit will increase? This last adjustment doesn’t even buy milk. How much do YOU earn to post drivel like this? I’ll take THAT money, thanks.

    • The cost-of-living is determined by rules laid out by the people you elect to Congress. They tell the Department of Labor what indices to use to measure inflation. Getting mad at the wrong people may feel momentarily fulfilling but it will never fix the problem. You need to pester your Congressman and Senators to fix this. And BTW, one party (currently in power) is looking to impose another way of figuring the COLA that will pay you (over time) a lot less. So when you get mad think about what you are actually voting for. You may get what you deserve for not paying attention to what politicians really stand for. Don’t throw your vote away on people who will not fix anything or make it worse!

    • I think COLA is figured wrong, the use of percent is an uneven amount, COLA’s should be a dollar amount, the same amount to all, convert percent to an average dollar amount and all get the same dollar amount as a COLA.

    • Buenos días si tengo el crédito autorizado cómo le ago para disponer del dinero ATT. Laudino López Bonilla

  6. I live in Charlottesville. Virginia and would like to have
    an appointment to talk to someone about my social
    security account.
    Please reply

    • Hi Kathryn. Some of our local offices do offer walk-in appointments; however, these appointments are on a first come, first serve basis. Remember that most Social Security services do not require a visit to a local office. Many services, including applying for retirement, disability or Medicare benefits are conveniently available at our website.
      We encourage our customers to create a my Social Security account. With a personal my Social Security account, you can review your earnings record and get estimates of your future benefits.
      Also, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to a Social Security representative between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Friday. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. We hope this information helps!

  7. Who saw any increase, they took out more for Medicare, so how are retirees to live on no increases to help off set higher prices; groceries, insurance, prescriptions, it’s terrible how seniors get treated, you work 40 years and still the government takes, and takes, and we get nothing in return for all the years we paid into the system!

  8. I have worked 14 years after starting my Social Security. Do you automatically check this or do I have to request it?

  9. I have worked ever since I started my Social Security monthly pay. I thought that my current salary would add up to me drawing more but nothing has changed. If my current earnings don’t help me, whom do they help?

  10. I would like information on how to increase withdrawal of fed and state taxes from our paychecks. Thank you!

  11. Hello everyone. My name is Melissa. I am 51 years old. I had a massive stroke back in May 1993. I started receiving SSI payments 2 years later. And ive also had 3 TIA and have multiple health conditions. Like high blood pressure, thyroid disease, emphysema, copd, high cholesterol, DDD, 3 pinched nerves in my back, scoliosis, authorities of the spine, 2 buldging discs, sciatic nerve disorder, nerve disorder, sway back, narrowing of the spine, anxiety and panic disorder, MVP, etc. Anyway, my question is for u. Can I qualify for SSDI along with receiving my SSI benefits? Thank u for listening. Some people have told me I could. And some have told me no I couldn’t. I’m really not sure myself. BC I haven’t work or can work with all my health issues. And my SSI is just not quite enough to cover my bills, medicine copays, and drs. Please let me know by email. ( hurdmelissa50@gmail.com) thank u and GOD BLESS U All

    • I understand you cannot draw both and for SSI you have to had worked your last 10 years under SS. But good question, I hope they get back to you.

      • When you filed for SSI, your eligibility for Social Security disability payments would have automatically been checked. Because you were under age 31 when you had your stroke, less work than 5 out of 10 years woukd have been required. By the way, people can receive both SSA and SSI disability payments if their SSA benefit amount is small and their income and resources are low.

    • They have to by law pay you your social security before they consider SSI because the regular social security might be too high for you to get SSI. Don’t post your private Email address. If you are on SSI you are entitled to MEDICAID and you do not have to pay for any necessary medication. Contact your welfare office.

    • Hello Melissa, we pay disability via two programs: the Social Security Disability Insurance program, for people who have worked and paid Social Security taxes long enough to be eligible, and the Supplemental Security Income program, which pays benefits based on financial need.
      When it comes to qualifying for disability benefits under the Social Security Disability Income or SSDI program, individuals must have worked long enough–and recently enough–under Social Security to qualify for disability benefits. Generally, you need 40 credits, 20 of which you have to earn within the last 10 years before you become disabled.
      If you have specific questions about your situation, please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask one of our representatives to assist you. Thanks!

  12. My Social Security check come to my bank monthly.
    I have a new bank account that I want to have my check sent to instead of the current one.
    How shall I go about this?
    I originally filed at full maturity (67) and my yearly gross has averaged $80-90 K yet my payments are essentially the same as when I originally filed.
    I am 75 and still working but my check hasn’t increased except for a COLA.
    Is this within normal limits?
    Thank you for your response.

    • Hello Ronald, you can use your personal my Social Security account to change your direct deposit information on your benefit record.
      Also, When you apply for retirement benefits, we base your benefit payment on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that were used to compute your retirement benefit, then we recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically.
      For specific questions on your situation, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 and speak to one of our agents. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Thanks!

  13. This article says, “Social Security uses your highest thirty-five years of earnings to figure your benefit.”
    I heard that this does not include overtime pay, just a plain 40 hour work week. Is that true?

  14. I applied for Medicare when I turned 65. I deferred SS until my full retirement age, which is 66. I am now 66 and want to begin receiving social security. How do I begin that process.

  15. I kept working and paying into SS – the more I worked the higher my Medicare premium rose. $130 to $200 – not right. I’ve worked hard, paid taxes on 85% of SS income for years, paid fed and state tax, real estate taxes; I barely use my Medicare – provider is terrible.

  16. I would like to know why my Retirement social security payment comes on sporadic dates instead of a date every month. Why would it come every 3d Wednesday of the month instead of like the 15th of every month. This scews the month up like crazy since I depend on it to pay bills. I have been struggling with this since I retired. Nobody else I know receives their payments like that.

    • Since you still get a check every month, the funds are available to pay bills every month. Think of it as money arriving a week BEFORE you need it, not three weeks later.

    • Hello Karen. Spreading payments or “payment cycling” as we call it, was created in May 1997, to change the mass mailing of Social Security checks and payments to our beneficiaries –which used to take place on every 3rd day of the month-.
      When all Social Security beneficiaries were paid on the 3rd of each month, it made the days immediately following “check day” the busiest in SSA field offices and telephone service centers. Now, under “payment cycling” beneficiaries receive their payments on the 2nd, 3rd, or 4th Wednesday of the month. Your payment date is established, based on the date of birth of the person on whose record you collect benefits.
      This change has significantly allow our representatives to attend to our daily demands, and try to provide our public with better service.
      We thank you for your feedback and appreciate your understanding!

    • Your benefits will increase only if your earnings are higher than the years used in the original calculation of benefits. Ray Hernandez has explained that numerous times.

    • Hello Edwin, when you apply for retirement benefits, we base your benefit payment on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits.
      Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that were used to compute your retirement benefit, then we recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically.

  17. I would like to see the “windfall” provision removed. OR, pay the amount removed by the “windfall” and tax it.

    • You opted not to received full benefits when you chose early benefits. By around age 85, it evens out – you will have received the same amount of money, just gotten it in smaller amounts over a longer period.

    • Hi Marvin. If a person begins to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to their full retirement age, their benefits are reduced. The reduction factors are permanently applied to all of the benefits the person may qualify for. We hope this provides clarity, thanks!

  18. Can you provide me with information concerning a Restricted Application and File and Suspend in applying for social security benefits

  19. The social security office figures out the payment according to the last 35 years of earnings. If women stay home and take care of the family until they are grown and start to work at 36 years old how can they make up for the years lost. this is not fair to the women who take care of the family and can’t earn social security for 35 years.

  20. Can I get an independent divorced benefit at 62 and continue working without having to use my retirement benefit?

  21. We received a 2.0 % increase from Cola and a 3.0% increase for our Insurance Cost. Everything else increased, Bread, Butter, Milk, Candy, Meds. I just don’t understand. I paid Medicare all my working life and I am still paying into Medicare from my SS check and I also have a part time job that takes out Medicare. Yet I pay a $20.00 co-pay for every Dr. Visit and more for Medical Procedures. Just venting to the truth.

    • One cost you forgot to figure for, your health costs. Do you think that there was a zero percent gain in doctor bills, hospital bills, prescription drug costs? If these costs go up each year, wouldn’t it make sense that your premium should increase as well?

  22. So, I worked 46 years when I retired at age 63 and a half, does it means I should be getting more money than what I was assessed at time of retirement?

  23. Hi if you can do this for people then why can’t your dept. make it right for my husband, my husband had worked 38 years as a electrictran he was told by his boss that he was at the age he could file for his ss and so he did and was still working ok now 1 year later he is on his way to work gets into a 3 car crash and is airlifted to KMC trauma center were there was 2 teams put together to see over him. he was 67 at the time and had plenty of CREDITS but was told know when we looked into SSRD (BULL CRAP) is there any one out there that is on the up &up because i have dealing with this for over 5 years I let it go and then get mad and call again one lie told to me after another and yes i am talking about both my local offices to the 1/800 number people will tell you any thing and there is nothing you can do. my husband’s wreck was JUNE,30,2011 thank god he had taken out extra LTD though his employer which only lasted intill 2014 then we were left screwed.
    And the part that really bothers me is they know SSA that they beat him out of his hard earned money and I would like to know why, why know one that has the power to help us has, and who do these people in these offices think they are, the money is not coming from there wallets so whats the problem I mean my husband honestly deserves to be receiving SSRD, I would be more then thankful if any one that reads this could help us. trying to resolve this for to many years there was know reason for this to be in question. also I would like this documented once again I am reaching for some one any one who might still care that has the power to care, We were done so wrong for so long even as I am writing this the date being JUNE 21,2018

    • Once you reach full retirement age, you no longer get disability. You wasted a lot of time typing up his life story.

    • To Cynthia I have no Idea what state you live in but I am in Tampa florida You should have a person there that likes to run people over when ever they can.this person will work for ABC NEWS. We have one here and she is grate call ABC and see what happens

  24. I have worked a part time job with NAPA delivering auto parts in Troy Missouri the past 12 years—-Every check has social security and medicare taken out but my about $750.00 each year. Should I get that back or should I get additional amount on my monthly social security check? Please reply

  25. Thank you for this information. Since I am struggling right now and still working at age 65, I think I will make an appt. with SS about early retirement.

  26. Cannot save an accident took all my retirement money. My car carreeer even children.. I’ve spent years just trying to receive DME I needed to function. I get step programs try this need prier autherisation won’t pay denied till now I’m allergic to so many drugs poured into iv at hospitals and I’m certain if I’d been given the best I would have returned to work. Couldn’t live on SsI alone eat proper and I needed oxygen and a moerized chair because scar tissue and misfiring nerves.
    Big mess. I was treated like a crimminsl until I found an agency CIL called Abil.
    I was cohersed into taking retirement early and now I receive 1/3 of what I would have been given

  27. I would like to know when will my social security benefits will go up ? my reason for asking this question is because this month I ,had a birthday and turned 70 years old . surely look forward to hearing back concerning this matter soon as possible

    • Hello Herman. Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement benefits, your monthly benefit amount could increase. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits.
      The other way your monthly benefit amount could increase is based on the Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA), which is announced each year in October. We hope this information helps.

  28. What do you do if you can not pay the amounts some creditors want you to pay. Can they garnish your Social Security? We are trying to live on our Social Security so we can both write. It is the way of working for us that allows us to work hard for four hours then enjoy the rest of the day without high stress. I enjoyed my high stress job as did my husband, but we both worked for 42 years and we are worn out. Will we really be able to live or will our creditors tears us apart?

  29. If you are not able to work after you turn 62 so you apply for SS and start receiving it and then your spouse passes away without getting to SS age because you are older then him but his SS is way higher can you then start to collect his?

  30. Maria A Ancira.
    I am currently working at IRS.
    It just came in my mind that i can work with Social Securit Administration, but i do not see where can i apply for a job.
    I am fluent in Spanish; i know i could be a good asset for Social Security Administration offices. I also have my resume at http://www.usajobs.gov

    Thanks,
    Maria

    • The IRS has a bad reputation for their illegal activity concerning conservative groups, maybe the SSA will not find you a suitable candidate. Stay where you are and keep flying under the radar. Just sayin’.

  31. If I retire at 65 instead 66 Will there be a big difference.presently I am a federal employee with about 34years I am a GS 11 STEP 3 I THINK.

  32. wOW!! We got a 2% increase in Social Security, and Medicare gets to increase your monthly payment and takes that 2% increase.

  33. Thank you for explaining the ways of possibly increasing a retirement payment. As a retired Federal employee I volunteer at a VA medical clinic and try to keep myself informed of changes to benefits for myself, my family and all the Veterans I come into contact with. This article was clear and very informative.
    Hope to see more topics clarified.

    • Thanks for your feedback, Marie! We value your opinion of us and look forward to many more years of serving you in the future.

  34. Interestingly, for each COLA increase we have, we also have an increase in the amount deducted for Medicare Part B Premiums, which offsets the COLA increase. For example, in 2018 we had a 2.0% COLA increase, which increased my gross S.S. payment, but Medicare deductions from check went from $111.00 a month to $134.00 per month, which increased my deductions by $23.00 per month. In 2017, my total Medicare deductions were $1,332.00. In 2018, they will be $1,608.00. Do the math.

    • Interestingly, you were unaware of the laws regarding hold harmless provision, and cola/Medicare premium increases. Perhaps you should endeavor yourself to do a little research, as these laws have been on the books for at least 20 years.

  35. Why do they make it so confusing so we have to keep asking questions? Our minds get confused enough just by aging! HA!! So I took early SS at 62..had breast cancer and then my Mother had a stroke so I was her caregiver. After she passed I went back to work. In 2016 I made more money than I ever made during my 47 years of working! Unfortunately, I didn’t realize I was to stop my SS payments. So now I am 66 yr old, no longer working and I lost my SS payments. So let this be a lesson..don’t take it early..no matter how desperate you are!..If you make over the allowed amount ,stop the payments during that time. Since I took SS early, but I made more money then ever, am I still eligible to have my payments increase (according to the article above) when they do start paying me again? (BTW they do start paying me again after I pay back the years worth of over-payments!) Thanks in advance Snarky, I am sure you will have some hysterical comment to make! 🙂

    • Thank you for your question, Char. Individuals already receiving Social Security benefits are automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B at age 65 or when they become eligible. However, because you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you do have the option of turning it down. Generally, a beneficiary may refuse Medicare Part B, during his or her Initial Enrollment Period, if that beneficiary or the spouse, actively works and has coverage under a group health plan based on that employment, then he or she doesn’t need Medicare part B until the work activity ends or that health care coverage is dropped.
      In all situations, we always suggest that individuals speak to their personnel office, health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future.
      To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.Medicare.gov.
      For specific questions about your case, call 1-800-772-1213, M-F between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. and ask a representative to assist you, or you can contact your local office directly. We hope this helps!

  36. If you already draw ssi but have recently become disabled can you reapply and will that increase your monthly check? Asking for another person.

    • SSI is a needs based program that can pay benefits to disabled adults and children and to individuals age 65 or older with limited income and resources. Your SSI payments are based on your current income and resources. If you’re already receiving SSI benefits you do not need to re-apply. Thanks!

  37. por favor pregunto si yo recibo 448 Dolares mensual y fuera del seguro 700 mas si puedo tener mas beneficios Gracias

  38. I appreciate the advice & tips you provide, but using Susie Orman is a bad choice. The woman is a fraud. Her credit cards were reviewed as being overpriced and laced with fees that took money from people who couldn’t afford it. Find someone else, like possibly Clark Howard.

  39. I keep hearing that congress has taken a lot out of Social Security and plans to take more. Is this true? I heard 2034 will be the year SS goes broke.

  40. I need a letter from the IRS that shows I did not have to pay taxes this last year, because I did not make enough money from my social security income, and I had no other income.

    • Hello Frank. You will need to contact the IRS. Their toll-free number is 1-800-829-1040. We hope this helps!

  41. I have taken ill this year. I am on short term disability with my company. I have not been able to work for six months. I will be 62 in two weeks and have worked 32 years. Can I apply for SSD now and generally how long will I have to wait to receive benefits.? Do I also apply for social security at the same time?

    • Hello Maesha. Social Security pays only for total disability. We pay disability benefits to people under their full retirement age who are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last one year or more or end in death. No benefits are payable for partial disability or short-term disability.
      If you think you are disabled under our rules, you can file for disability online.
      Also, you can apply for reduced retirement benefits at age 62. We can pay your retirement benefits while we consider your application for disability.
      See what you can do online, or call us at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778) between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday for more information or to make an appointment. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week.
      We hope this information helps!

  42. I moved and want to know how to change the bank where my SS check is deposited. I can’t find the information anywhere. Can you help.

  43. I seriously do not comment on the internet about anything financial in my life…….also this is not my real name…..

  44. I’m not clear on early retirement . I would like to know if I retire at 62 I will receive about $400 less a month than if I retired at 65 or 67 . I need to continue working in order to survive.
    Will I get the $400 more a month once I reach full retirement age or will I continue with the lower monthly benefit from here forward…

  45. I’m collecting social security full benefits. I’m at full retirement age but still have to continue to work, so therefore I’m still paying into social security. Will I see an increase in my benefits because I’m still paying into it?

    • Hello Patti. As long as you continue to work and receive benefits, we will check your record every year to see whether the additional earnings will increase your monthly benefit. If there is an increase, we will send you a letter telling you of your new benefit amount.
      In addition, after you reach full retirement age, we will recalculate your benefit amount to give you credit for any months in which you did not receive a benefit because of your earnings. We will send you a letter telling you about any increase in your benefit amount. Thanks!

  46. I have heard that after i reach 66 years old I can work full time and draw a check from Medicare each month without any penalties. How does that work? Also what about taxable income?

    • Great question Pamela, if you were born January 2, 1943, through January 1, 1955, then your full retirement age for retirement insurance benefits is 66. If you work and are full retirement age or older, the amount you make at work will not affect your Social Security benefits, no matter how much you earn. Your payments come from Social Security Administration, not Medicare.
      Also, some people have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. This usually happens only if you have other substantial income (such as wages, self-employment, interest, dividends and other taxable income that must be reported on your tax return) in addition to your benefits.
      See Withholding Income Tax From Your Social Security Benefits for information on this topic. Thanks!

  47. I chose to start getting social security at 62 but still work. Iam 69 this year and I don’t believe I am getting any of the money that was kept back from my checks due to working and drawing early social security. I am past full retirement age…did I not do something right?

    • your wages rhat you earn from your job has to be higher in 1 year than the 35highest yrs that ssa used to fiqure your benefit.If your wages ate higher they will recalculate it automacially. They check each year.

  48. This post is very educative to people especially to me when I read it. Thank you so much. Keep on with the information.

    • Thanks for your feedback! Your thoughts are important to us and we’re pleased when feedback is positive. We try hard to provide the best possible service to our customers and your satisfaction is our reward.

  49. I am 62. I have a 10 year old daughter. If I decide to sign up for social security. Will my daughter receive benefits also. According to my income chart on social security. I can get $834.00 will this increase with my daughter she is not disabled.

    • Hello Terry. When you start receiving Social Security retirement benefits, some members of your family may also qualify to receive benefits on your record.
      Your child may receive a monthly payment of up to one-half of your full retirement benefit amount. These payments will not decrease your retirement benefit. In fact, the value of the benefits your child may receive, added to your own, may help you decide if taking your benefits sooner may be more advantageous.
      Normally, benefits stop when children reach age 18 unless they are disabled. However, if the child is still a full-time student at a secondary (or elementary) school at age 18, benefits will continue until the child graduates or until two months after the child becomes age 19, whichever is first.
      See our Benefits Planner: Benefits For Your Family for more information.

    • Hello Joseph. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week.
      Individuals within three months of age 65 or older and not ready to start their monthly cash benefits can use our online retirement application to sign up for Medicare ONLY and apply for their retirement benefits at a later date. Since you must pay a premium for Part B coverage, you have the option of turning it down. However, we suggest that individuals speak to their health benefits advisor, or health plan representative to see what’s best for them, and to prevent any penalties or delayed enrollment in the future.
      To learn more about the Medicare enrollment periods visit http://www.Medicare.gov, and read our publication “Apply Online for Medicare – Even If You Are Not Ready to Retire“.
      We hope this information helps!

    • Hello Robert. Unfortunately, and because of security reasons we do not have access to personal records in this blog and cannot answer your question at this time. One of our representatives should be able to provide you with an explanation. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Thanks.

  50. I was told that after I retire from work and are getting my SS checks, that if i do some work I can make as much as I want. I this true?

    • Hello Mary, if you elect to receive benefits before you reach full retirement age, you should understand how continuing to work can affect your benefits. See “Getting Benefits While Working” for complete information on this topic. Thanks!

  51. My full retirement age is 66. If my annual income is reduced due to going part time once I have reached full retirement age does this lower or adversly affect my monthly Social Security benefit (benefit based on highest 35 year period)? Also once you start receiving SS benefits do you continue to pay income tax, social security and medicare on those benefits?

    • Hello Daniel. When you apply for retirement benefits, we base your benefit payment on your highest 35 years of earnings and your age when you start receiving benefits. Higher lifetime earnings result in higher benefits. If there were some years you didn’t work or had low earnings, your benefit amount may be lower than if you had worked steadily.
      Also, some people have to pay federal income taxes on their Social Security benefits. This usually happens only if you have other substantial income (such as wages, self-employment, interest, dividends and other taxable income that must be reported on your tax return) in addition to your benefits. For further income tax questions, you will need to contact the IRS. Their toll-free number is 1-800-829-1040.
      We hope this information helps!

  52. Social Security Payment how much can I make without affecting my Social Security Payment. I will be 70 on 11/22/2018 and or my taxes. I am retired but need more money for bills

  53. Hi, I began receiving disability (SSDI?) at age 50. I worked from age 15 until then. When I became eligible for Medicare, I was told that my income was below the amount that would cause it to be taken out of my check. When I received my first check after becoming eligible for Medicare, they did take it out of my check. I contacted S.S. who told me to contact Job+Fam. Serv. who in turn told me to contact S.S.. This went on for 8 mo. Then they stopped taking it out, but I was told I would receive reimbursement for 7mo. of the 8 that they incorrectly took it out. I never received that. Then The back and forth referring started again. I need dental work and could use it for that, but don’t know how to get it. Any information for this? Thanks+God bless

    • Hello Barbara. Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog. Please continue working with your local office. You can request to speak with the manager to see how we can help to expedite resolution of your situation.
      If you are unable to visit the local office, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213, representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Thanks!

  54. At age 67 my husband retired mostly due to his health. At the time I had been on SSI for many health reasons since 2002. When we went to the office we was told what he would receive and that I no longer would get the SSI check but the check I would receive increased but my disability is not considered any longer. My main question is, if my husband dies or we divorce will my check change? Especially if he dies. We are having such a hard time making it. Due to illness and other major health issues we are barely to make it. As Iam sure so many others are in the same situation. I will wait for an answer.

    • Thank you for your question Linda. In the event that your husband dies, and if you already receive benefits as a spouse on your husband’s record, your benefit will automatically convert to survivors benefits after we receive the report of death.
      If a person already receives retirement benefits on his or her own record, they can only apply for benefits as a widow or widower if the retirement benefit they receive is less than the benefits they would receive as a survivor.
      We hope this information helps.

  55. I am receiving social security. I also work for myself and pay into social security since i retired. Why hasn’t my benefits increased?

    • Hello Lorraine. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than any of the years that were used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. If an increase is due, a new monthly benefit amount is established on your record automatically.
      You may contact us and request a review of your records. You can also call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. You will generally have a shorter wait time if you call later in the week. Thanks!

  56. Why does my sign in not recognize me. I am trying to buy a car and I need a print out of my benefit amount

    • Hello Edward. If you are unable to create an account or encounter a problem with your my Social Security account, you may:
      •Call us at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), Monday through Friday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. At the voice prompt, say “helpdesk”; or
      •Contact your local Social Security office. Thanks!

  57. My step daughter Susan Coake is receiving SSD and is the owner of a medical business called Ergoizeit in California How is this possible?

  58. I’m inquiring as to the recent SS Administration Announcement Affecting Benefits. It seems there is one word that I can use to increase my yearly benefit. How do I find out if I am entitled to the increase/

  59. I plan on retiring on my 62th birthday this Nov 8th. I plan on working the rest of the year. Does the earning I will make in Dec count toward 17k+ or does the amount I worked prior to my bd count towards that 17k +

  60. I have been getting threating calls from this phone number 214-613-9115 saying they are from Social Security office.

    • Hello Lillie. SSA employees occasionally contact citizens by telephone for customer-service purposes. An SSA employees may call you in limited situations, such as if you recently filed a claim or have other Social Security business that are pending.
      If a person has questions about any communication—email, letter, text or phone call—that claims to be from SSA, please contact your local Social Security office, or call Social Security’s toll-free customer service number at 1-800-772-1213, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday, to verify its legitimacy (TTY number at 1-800-325-0778). Thanks.

  61. Why can I not receive my late husband’s benefits, as ruled by the ALJ for “mental illness”, i.e., nervous breakdown, due to the death of my husband, and my own SS retirement benefits? I finally was able to work very part time but I made very little. Now I am house bound and could use both benefits. I worked since I was 15 years of age until I became ill.

  62. My husband worked for the post office so I receive civil service benefits (he’s deceased) but he also paid 9 years into social security, his salary was much greater than mine after paying, I signed up late was not aware there was a penalty for this. I only draw 234.00
    A month now that I’m cut 187. 00 this is a real hardship on me nothing left for groceries, is there any help for me..Thank you Carolyn Likes

    • Unfortunately, and because of security reasons we do not have access to personal records in this blog and cannot provide specific information at this time. One of our representatives should be able to assist you and provide better guidance. Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Thanks.

  63. I was lied to. I was going to retire at 66 or 67 years old because I was going to continue to work after I retired from the Texas school district. I was told it did not matter if I earned a million dollars, I would still get the same amount if I retired at 65 years old. Instead of getting $735.00, I get $226.00 related to being misinformed. Please help me with this issue. I have a mortgage of $740.00 a month because I qualified related to being misinformation I am having a hard time having ends meet.
    Sincerely

    • Hello Natalia. A pension based on work that is not covered by Social Security (for example, Federal civil service and some State or local government agencies) may cause the amount of your Social Security benefit to be reduced. Some school districts did not pay into Social Security, and are subject to the Windfall Elimination Provision (WEP).
      The WEP can affect how we calculate your benefit amount, resulting in a lower Social Security benefit than you otherwise would receive. Thanks!

  64. I am retired and was on disability for a few years. I am now wondering if i could work a little to pay off some debt. The doctor told me not to go back to teaching, but something i can get out of easily if i need to. I do not understand how much extra i can make a year?

  65. I want to discontinue having the extra money for tax purposes taken out of my SS check.
    I believe right now it is over 500 dollars a month.
    I am fully retired and not receiving income.
    Who should I calll to have this changed

  66. To who it may concern. The cost of living in california is way over a 2% Increase. How can you explain this to a senior lady of 71 yrs of age. The cost of living here just keeps going up and up in every field. Rent, food gas
    clothing.

    Francine Carroll

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