Online Services, Taxes

Tax Season — It’s About What You Know

March 17, 2016 • By

Last Updated: March 17, 2016

a picture of stree signs that read tax season, and again.Did you know that your Social Security benefits may be taxable?

This includes your monthly retirement, survivor, and disability benefits. About one-third of people receiving Social Security benefits must pay taxes on some of these benefits, depending on the amount of their taxable income. This may happen if you have other significant income in addition to your Social Security benefits.

To find out whether you must pay taxes on your benefits, you will need your Social Security Benefit Statement (Form SSA-1099/1042S). You should automatically receive it in the mail each January. It shows the total amount of benefits you received from Social Security in the previous year so you know how much Social Security income to report to the Internal Revenue Service on your tax return. The benefit statement is not available for people who receive Supplemental Security Income (SSI), as SSI payments are not taxable.

If you didn’t receive your Benefit Statement or misplaced it, you can get an instant replacement easily by using your secure my Social Security account. If you don’t already have an online account, you can create one in minutes. Go to the my Social Security page, and select “Sign In or Create an Account.” Once you are logged in, select the “Replacement Documents” tab to obtain your replacement 1099 or 1042S benefit statement. You can also use your personal my Social Security account to keep track of your earnings each year, manage your benefits, and more.

You can also obtain a replacement benefit statement by calling us at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778), or contacting your local Social Security Office. If you live outside of the United States, please contact your nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate.

Don’t wait. Be ready! Open your own personal my Social Security account today.

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About the Author

Jim Borland, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Communications

Comments

  1. chris

    Is medical social security taxable by the
    Federal Government?

  2. Charles P.

    I did not receive my ssa 1099 social security benefit statement for 2020

    • Vonda

      Hi Charles. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page on how to obtain a replacement 1099. You also may be able to request a replacement SSA-1099 by using our automated telephone service at 1-800-772-1213. You can conduct the automated services 24 hours a day. At the prompt, indicate that you’re requesting a replacement SSA-1099. We hope this helps.

  3. Patricia p.

    I am 70 years old and recently single, I am collecting on my SS and also my deceased ex husbands. Will I have to pay taxes and if so what percentage? Thankyou

    • Vonda

      Hi Patricia, thanks for using our blog to ask your question. For information about taxation of benefits, visit our Income Taxes And Your Social Security Benefits web page. We hope this is helpful!

  4. Karen G.

    I will retire on September 30,2021 and collect my social security starting October 1st at 62 years and 7 months. I will have made up to 115,000 to date. Will I be penalized for wages earned prior to my retirement.

    • Vonda

      Hi Karen, thanks for using our blog. If you are under full retirement age for the entire year, then we deduct $1 from benefit payments for every $2 earned above the annual limit. For 2021, that limit is $18,960. There is a special earnings limit rule for those that retire mid-year and have already earned more than the yearly earnings limit. The special rule lets us pay a Social Security check for any whole month your earnings are $1,580 or less and you did not perform substantial services in self-employment, regardless of your yearly earnings.

      The Getting Benefits While Working web page provides more details.

      You may also find our Retirement Earnings Test Calculator helpful.

  5. Clif

    What form is used to change the witholding on my social security payments?

    • Vonda

      Thank you for your question, Clif. To change your federal tax withholding, you will need to complete another Form W-4V. You can download the form or call the IRS toll-free at 1-800-829-3676 and ask for Form W-4V. When you complete the form, you can choose to have 7, 10, 12, or 22 percent of your monthly benefit withheld for taxes. Mail the completed, signed form to your local Social Security office. Use our Social Security Office Locator to obtain their mailing address.

      Check out our Withholding Income Tax From Your Social Security Benefits web page for more information. We hope this is helpful!

  6. Donna M.

    I work full time and turned 67 last August. How much can I make before my social security is penalized?

    • Sue

      Hi, Donna. Thanks for using our blog and for your question. If you were born in 1953, your full retirement age is 66. The good news is you can get Social Security retirement (or survivors) benefits and work at the same time. Beginning with the month you reached full retirement age, your earnings no longer reduced your benefits, no matter how much you earned.

      We review the records for all Social Security recipients who work. If you are collecting benefits and your latest year of earnings turns out to be one of your highest years, we will refigure your benefit and pay you any increase due. This is an automatic process, and benefits are paid in December of the following year. To learn more, visit our Receiving Benefits While Working webpage.

      We hope this helps.

  7. Eva G.

    How do I cancel my voluntary withholding amount?

    • Vonda

      Hi Eva, thanks for using our blog to ask your question. To stop your withholding, you’ll need to complete Form W-4V from the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). You can download the form or call the IRS toll-free at 1-800-829-3676 and ask for Form W-4V. Sign the form and return it to your local Social Security office by mail. Use our Social Security Office Locator to obtain the mailing address of your local office.

  8. Larry E.

    wife started collecting on husband SS as well as her own in 2020. She received 2, 1099 forms. How do we claim on tax return, do we combine totals for only one entry on tax form?

    • Vonda

      Hi Larry, thanks for using our blog. If the two combined amounts equal the total amount that your wife received, then it would be appropriate to add them together. If the amounts are not correct, please call your local Social Security office. Look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

  9. Angie T.

    Due to alimony, I need to withhold approximately 25% -more than the maximum 22%. How can I have the extra 3% withheld from my SSDI? Thank you.

    • Vonda

      Hi Angie, thanks for using our blog. When you complete the form, you can only choose to have 7, 10, 12, or 22 percent of your monthly benefit withheld for taxes. Mail the completed, signed form to your local Social Security office. Use our Social Security Office Locator to obtain their mailing address.

      Check out our Withholding Income Tax From Your Social Security Benefits web page for more information. We hope this is helpful!

  10. Robert K.

    My husband received his ssa1099, what form do we use to file for his taxable income?

    • Vonda

      Hi Robert, thanks for using our blog. A Social Security 1099 tells a beneficiary how much Social Security income to report to the IRS on their tax return. For information about taxation of benefits, visit our Income Taxes And Your Social Security Benefits web page. We hope this helps!

Comments are closed.