Online Services, Retirement

National my Social Security Week: April 4-13, 2016

April 4, 2016 • By

Reading Time: 2 Minutes

Last Updated: July 29, 2021

For more than 80 years, Social Security has helped secure today and tomorrow with information, tools, and resources to meet your changing needs and lifestyles.

Mature African American Couple Using Laptop At Breakfast

Today begins National my Social Security Week. With the help of a myriad of groups and organizations, Social Security will host numerous events and activities across the country to raise awareness about the benefits of opening a secure online my Social Security account.

With a my Social Security account, you can:

  • Keep track of your earnings and verify them every year;
  • Get an estimate of your future benefits, if you are still working;
  • Get a letter with proof of your benefits, if you currently receive them; and
  • Manage your benefits:
    • Change your address;
    • Start or change your direct deposit;
    • Get a replacement Medicare card; and
    • Get a replacement SSA-1099 or SSA-1042S for tax season.

In some states, you can also request a replacement Social Security card online using my Social Security . This service is currently available in the District of Columbia, Iowa, Kentucky, Michigan, Nebraska, New Mexico, Pennsylvania, Washington, and Wisconsin. It’s an easy, convenient, and secure way to request a replacement card online. To request a replacement card online, you must:

  • Have or create a my Social Security  account;
  • Have a valid driver’s license in a participating state or the District of Columbia (or a state-issued identification card in some states);
  • Be age 18 or older and a United States citizen with a domestic U.S. mailing address (this includes APO, FPO, and DPO addresses); and
  • Not be requesting a name change or any other changes to your card.

We will provide updates when the service becomes available in additional states.

During National my Social Security Week and in conjunction with Financial Literacy Month, we will hold “Check Your Statement Day” on Thursday, April 7, 2016 to encourage others to join the millions who regularly check their Social Security Statement. By supporting our Thunderclap campaign, you can join us to rally the public and use social media to encourage workers to check their Statement every year. This is important because we base your future benefits on your recorded earnings. Your Statement can help you plan for your financial future. We encourage you to go online to my Social Security  to access your Statement whenever you have a change of employment or wish to verify any changes in your benefit estimate.

Help secure your today and tomorrow. Open a my Social Security account at www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount.


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About the Author

Jim Borland, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Communications

Jim Borland, Assistant Deputy Commissioner, Communications

Comments

  1. Valeire

    I retired at the age of 62 and I was penilized for it I receive a small amount each month will this ever change? It is a good thing that I have someone to live with and a roof over my head because with what I’m collecting I would never be able to make it on my own …and I would like to know if I can work part time?

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for your questions Valerie. The amount of benefits you receive is established at the time you applied for retirement benefits. It is based on the amount of your average lifetime earnings and your age at the time you applied. If a person file and starts receiving retirement benefits at age 62 or any time prior to their full retirement age, their benefit amount is reduced. Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement (or survivors) benefits, your monthly benefit amount could increase. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. The other way your monthly benefit amount could increase is based on the Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA), which is announced each year in October. We hope this information helps.

  2. Anonymous

    Tried multiple times to create an online account but the browser instantly declares “We cannot process your request at this time. Please try again later.” Yes, my credit bureau account is unlocked but the web site reports the denial so quickly it couldn’t possibly be hitting Experian anyway.

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for using our online services! Please call 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. After you hear “Briefly tell me why you are calling,” say “Help Desk” for help with a my Social Security account. Sometimes, it might be best to visit your local Social Security office for further assistance.

  3. Cheryl

    I’ll be 62 in three months and want to file. I’m going to keep working as I only make mid 30000’s. I can receive only half till full retirement of 66. Then I fully retire. Can you explain my options? Thanks

    • Ray F.

      Hi Cheryl, you can get Social Security retirement benefits and work at the same time. However, since you are younger than the full retirement age (currently 66), and make more than the yearly earnings limit (2016 limit is $15,720), your earnings may reduce your Social Security benefit amount. If your earnings will be over the limit for the year but you will be retired for part of the year, we have a special rule that applies to earnings for that one year. Please visit our Retirement Planner: Getting Benefits While Working and read our publication How Work Affects Your Benefits for more information.

    • Annie

      If you’ve managed on your salary up to now and are going to continue working, consider not applying for SS benefits. They will be significantly reduced for early age retirement and that will be the amount you continue to receive even when you reach your “normal” full retirement age of 66. Each year you can postpone receiving SS, the higher your benefits will be.

  4. Robert W.

    If you don’t have enough quarters on your own account,how do you find out if you are elligible for benefits based on your spouse’s receiving benefits due to having enough quarters. I haven’t found a clear answer. The phone wait seems too long.
    Tks

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for your question Robert. Even if you have never worked under Social Security, you may be able to get spouse’s retirement benefits if you are at least 62 years of age and your spouse is receiving retirement or disability benefits. You can also qualify for Medicare at age 65. Visit our Retirement Planner: Benefits For You As A Spouse for more information.

  5. cs g.

  6. JUAN A.

    I live in Mexico and I want to create an account. How can I do that?

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for your question Juan, we appreciate you trying to create an account. At this time you must have a U. S. mailing address to create or to access your online account. The “my Social Security” authentication system requires address verification as one of the essential criteria for issuing an account. People with APO/FPO/DPO addresses can create an account overseas, but our system does not support registration and account creation for users with a foreign address yet. For assistance related to Social Security benefits, you may contact the U.S. Embassy in Mexico by phone or email. Also, our Office of International Operations (OIO) home page provides more information to assist our customers living abroad.

  7. Joan H.

    Do not keep me on your subscribers list..Joan Hoskins

  8. Barbara M.

    During the last couple of weeks an article has been circulating on the internet that says if you were born before 1969 you can get an extra $4,098.
    It also says that the deadline for this to happen is April 30th 2016.

    • Ray F.

      We appreciate you bringing this to our attention Barbara. However, that information is incorrect. Section 831 of The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015 made some changes to Social Security’s laws about claiming retirement and spousal benefits. It also closed two complex loopholes that were used primarily by married couples. The new law applies to individuals who request a suspension on or after April 30, 2016. Remember that you can get the official information about Social Security at our website http://www.socialsecurity.gov.
      Help secure your today and tomorrow. Open a my Social Security account at http://www.socialsecurity.gov/myaccount

  9. tony

    Having to change the password on the My Social Security without requesting it is annoying feature of the account. You have to constantly change it every few months. Then if you forget your password, you have to call Customer Service and waste their time and yours.

    There should be a better way of recovering your password or setting a new password which can be all done online after you forgot your password.

    • Jane

      Thanks for that! It’s just the answer I nedeed.

      • Kayden

        Oooo sÃ¥ snyggt! Vilken härlig redigering av fotot! Genialt! packa light – smart! funkar ju hemma ocksÃ¥, att bara ta fram vissa sa.hk.r.emm värt att testa 🙂

  10. Gary D.

    On the web there is a company that is selling a book that claims to show a way to increase the monthly payout by Social Security. I believe that this is a come-on and that increased payouts that the advertisement claims are not possible. I am 80 and do not expect my monthly Social Security amount to change either up or down. Is my conclusion realistic?

    • Ray F.

      Thank you for your question Mr. Meyer. Generally, if you continue to work while receiving retirement (or survivors) benefits, your monthly benefit amount could increase. Each year, we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. The other way your monthly benefit amount could increase is based on the Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA), which is announced each year in October.

    • Liberty

      No colniampts on this end, simply a good piece.

Comments are closed.