Look Who’s Turning 80!

ACOSS Carolyn Colvin with the 80th Anniversary of Social Security seal

Not me.  Not yet!

I hope you have taken a moment to enjoy what Social Security Matters has to offer in the short time since its launch. Having another way to communicate with the American public is important to me.  This interactive experience offers great insight on what you think we are doing well and how you believe we can improve.

Today is very special — we are just 80 days away from Social Security’s 80th anniversary.  On August 14, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act into law. Today, Social Security is much more than the retirement program started 80 years ago. We remain the safety net for so many who depend on us each day.

I am delighted to share that you can join our celebration by visiting our newly launched website. This site offers an inside peek into our history, who we are today, and what you can expect from us in the future. I hope you will visit the site often to keep abreast of the activities taking place to commemorate this significant milestone. There will even be daily quick facts so you can learn more about Social Security.

I am proud to lead such a great organization as we continue to provide you with compassionate and professional service. In looking to the future with great anticipation and innovation, I am inspired—still—by President Roosevelt’s vision to meet the ever-changing needs of the public each day.

Here’s to another 80 years of serving the public!

 

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26 thoughts on “Look Who’s Turning 80!

    • We would like to thank all of you for your good wishes during our 80th anniversary week. We appreciate your comments and feedback, and hope that you continue to use this blog to communicate with us. We work diligently to offer the best service possible to the public and continually strive to improve its quality.
      On Social Security Matters, our intent is to provide general information and educate our readers about the variety of programs that Social Security offers. We do not have access to personal records, but we will try to answer your general questions about Social Security and direct you to the appropriate resources.
      Thank you again for your support. We look forward to “building the future” with you.

  1. I want to submit my request to receive my deceased (xhusband’s)who is the father to my 3 grown children, so that I can receive his SOCIAL SECURITY..I don’t get enough from my own to pay my bills, etc. My kids are helping me and I try to get Food Stamps.., etc.
    I was married to him almost 10years whereby I worked IN his privately owned businesses all the time I was with him, both times….WE divorced, AND I went back to him and lived and worked for him AGAIN..WITHOUT RECEIVING ANY KIND OF INCOME FROM HIM.. ..(proof is in the years I had no income on SS)..He had me working in all his businesses and claimed at the end of our (almost another 10-year period- HE had me as an employee.. NOT TRUE!! I HAD NO idea a spouse had to be married 10 years so this was very unknown and I want to request a HEARING WITH SOCIAL SECURITY TO CHANGE THIS RULING.) I was told by Deborah Pryce, Ohio Congress Woman, back then..and NOW my children want me to try again.. I think there’s a chance the Judge in Madison County can OVERTURN THAT RULING…THANK YOU!!..PLEASE CALL 614-260–2840 CAROLYN COX DAVIDSON .. RE: ROY L. DAVIDSON, JR. (BORN 7/21/1927)

  2. An interactive blog is a creative way to connect with the younger generation and to enhance service delivery in general. Way to go SSA! Feeling proud for the agency I work for. Thank you for your vision Commissioner Colvin! Looking forward to 2025.

  3. How do I get my hands on the little booklet that comes in the mail, giving you all the information on SSI, SSD, and Social Security in general. It basically gives you all the NEW UPDATES going on with Social Security,along with how much you earn, and how much you can earn if you are on SSI and you want to get a part time job. This book gives you your Social Security benefits earnings per annually for each year you worked! I think I said that right? If you understand my request, could you please answer me, and direct me in the right direction? Sincerely, MARILYN K. JASON

    • Marilyn, you can now access your Social Security Statement online at any time by creating a my Social Security account. With an account, you can review estimates of your retirement, disability, and survivors benefits, your earnings record, and the estimated Social Security and Medicare taxes you’ve paid. Also, we recently resumed mailing Social Security Statements to workers ages 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, and 60 and older if they do not receive Social Security benefits or have a my Social Security account. Workers should receive their Statements in the mail about three months before their birthday.

  4. informacion sobre mi medicare porque tiene 14 años y lo he usado y yo me encuentro imposiblitado de todo el cuerpo no puedo ni ver ni caminar

  5. Social Security is a proud part of our nation’s history and future. It allows people to live with dignity in their retirement that may not have been able to do much financial planning otherwise. We need to remind people, though, that Social Security was always intended to be an income supplement, not a person’s sole source of income in retirement. Celebrate the importance of Social Security and save for retirement individually, too.

  6. I started drawing social security at age of 62…I am now 66 years old…I have been working for the last 4 years and plan to retire again on 6-26-2015…How will this affect the amount of social security I am drawing now? Do I need to do anything about this.?

    • Christine, when you first applied for Social Security benefits at age 62, we calculated your monthly benefit amount using your earnings up to the year before the year in which you became entitled to benefits. If you continued to work, we automatically reviewed your records each year, to see if additional earnings could increase your monthly benefits. If you stop working as planned, we will add your 2015 earnings to your record when your employer reports them to us, and we will again review your records to see if those earnings may increase your monthly benefit amount. You don’t have to do anything! Work can affect your retirement benefits only up to the year in which you reach full retirement age. If you were born January 2, 1943, through January 1, 1955, then your full retirement age for retirement benefits is 66. If you work and are full retirement age or older, you may keep all of your benefits, no matter how much you earn. For more information and examples of how this works, please see our publication How Work Affects Your Benefits.

    • We would like to thank all of you for your good wishes during our 80th anniversary week. We appreciate your comments and feedback, and hope that you continue to use this blog to communicate with us. We work diligently to offer the best service possible to the public and continually strive to improve its quality.
      On Social Security Matters, our intent is to provide general information and educate our readers about the variety of programs that Social Security offers. We do not have access to personal records, but we will try to answer your general questions about Social Security and direct you to the appropriate resources.
      Thank you again for your support. We look forward to “building the future” with you.

  7. Quiero saber cuanto puntos me hacen falta para poder ser elegible al los beneficios SS por jubilacion tengo 66 años

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