37 thoughts on “How Social Security Helps Women Secure Today and Tomorrow

  1. I need my own social security welfare because I can’t afford to live with my husband’s benefit only. I need more money to pay for my rent also n food. Thanks! Mele A. Maumalanga

    • You may be eligible to receive additional assistance from the state where you live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. You can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services office.
      You can also visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services web page for more information. We hope this helps.

      • Hello Mele,

        Please contact you state Area Agency on Aging. This agency is responsible for implementing the Older Americans Act in your state. They provide many senior citizen programs for qualified seniors.

  2. I feel SS is not fair to all women who worked for the Federal Govt. I worked 30 years and retired in 1994 however I retired in order to start a new career. I have worked and paid into SS however by being a Federal Retiree I have to take a 40% reduction in what I draw because of drawing a federal retirement. My federal retirement has not changed much because of health benefits rising. So I am penalized. That is why I am 70 years old and still work full=time

    • Your problem is not with social security but with Congress. As with many commenters here, you readily confuse the two.

      Congress felt that government employees were double-dippers, even though you paid into both systems. You must have 30 significant years of work (or years of coverage) to lose that reduction. It should lessen with each new year of work you accrue to SSA’s records. If you feel the policy is unfair, you need to contact someone who can change the law. No one at SSA can do so.

  3. Have no idea if Ex is still surviving son doesn’t understand have no idea where he is he is remarried I am on SSDI will be 59 this yr. I know his SSI number we were married 22 yrs. Please reply.

    • Thank you for reaching out, Jennifer. Unfortunately, and because of security reasons we do not have access to personal records in this blog and cannot assist you in this matter. One of our representatives should be able to help you and provide more information.
      Please call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day or later in the week. Thanks.

  4. My husband died this past October – 2017 – and Social Security is STILL figuring out what I’m supposed to be paid based on his Social Security account. HELP me, please. We were married for almost 53 years. My marriage to him was my ONLY marriage. Is there a reason this is taking so long? Please advise…thank you.

    • Contact your local office. These issues cannot be resolved online where you should be safeguarding your private information, not sharing it. Your case may not still be in the local office, but delayed further down the line. They can supplement what you are receiving with a special payment in the meantime if you qualify.

    • We’re sorry to hear of your husband’s passing, Beverly. Unfortunately, but for security reasons, we do not have access to personal records in this blog.
      Please continue working with your local office. You can request to speak with the office manager to see how we can help expedite resolution of your situation.
      If you are unable to visit the local office, you can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m. Generally, you will have a shorter wait time if you call later during the day. Thanks.

  5. Social Security might work for some women, but since November of 2012, I have not received my SSI. I have been denied, lied to and discriminated against, even after the magistrate judge awarded in my favor. Nothing but the run around. I have been disabled since the early 1990’s, and still am. I have had to reapply when I shouldn’t have had to. I believe that I am being unjustly treated!

    • SSI is means tested. That means that if you are < 65, you have to be disabled AND you have to meet the income and resource tests. You can go to all the judges in the world and he can say you are disabled but you need to meet other eligibility requirements and the Judge can not change that, Congress can. So go bug your Congressman.

  6. My agency.gov llc public affairs federal contract received my ssa retirement account holding pay on 03/28/2018, because my birth on 03/28/1954! Now stay in Thailand! Order on 03/2/2017

  7. My name is Dorine Anderson my ex spouse is Darren Clayton Anderson I’ve work since 13 year’s of age Im entitled to spousal support by court order from my ex husband retirement pay by court order but he never gave me 750 a month what’s my help source

    • Hello Dorine, you may be able to receive -Social Security- benefits on your ex-spouse’s record if:
      • You were married to your ex-spouse for at least 10 years;
      • You are unmarried;
      • You are age 62 or older;
      • Your ex-spouse is entitled to Social Security retirement or disability benefits and,
      • The benefit you are entitled to receive based on your own work is less than the benefit you would receive based on your ex-spouse’s work.
      If your ex-spouse has not applied for retirement benefits, but can qualify for them (which includes he is at least age 62), you can receive benefits on his or her record if you have been divorced for at least two years. For more information, please visit our Retirement Planner: If You Are Divorced.

  8. Ideally,you would save for retirement and a home purchase simultaneously. 5-10 years is an awfully long time to put off retirement savings for a mid-term goal. That”s not to say that you have to max out an IRA to sufficiently save for retirement maybe 10-20% of your gross income is still under $5.5k/year. It”s OK to use a Roth IRA for your down payment savings because of the tax-free growth over those years, but I don”t love the idea. If you do it, I suggest you draw a clear line between the funds that are for retirement and the funds that are for a down payment. Since the two goals have different timelines, you should make different investment choices for each of them (the down payment investments should be more conservative). You also should prioritize your retirement savings getting into the Roth IRA; don”t let the down payment money use up contribution room that you would otherwise use for retirement savings. As you pointed out, you can remove contributions to a Roth IRA at any time and you can also remove $10k of earnings for a home purchase (5 years after your first contribution). It”s perfectly fine to keep your down payment investments in a taxable investment account if the Roth IRA is too cumbersome or you want to use all your IRA contribution room for retirement.

  9. Ideally, you would save for retirement and a home purchase simultaneously. 5-10 years is an awfully long time to put off retirement savings for a mid-term goal. That”s not to say that you have to max out an IRA to sufficiently save for retirement maybe 10-20% of your gross income is still under $5.5k/year. It”s OK to use a Roth IRA for your down payment savings because of the tax-free growth over those years, but I don”t love the idea. If you do it, I suggest you draw a clear line between the funds that are for retirement and the funds that are for a down payment. Since the two goals have different timelines, you should make different investment choices for each of them (the down payment investments should be more conservative). You also should prioritize your retirement savings getting into the Roth IRA; don”t let the down payment money use up contribution room that you would otherwise use for retirement savings. As you pointed out, you can remove contributions to a Roth IRA at any time and you can also remove $10k of earnings for a home purchase (5 years after your first contribution). It”s perfectly fine to keep your down payment investments in a taxable investment account if the Roth IRA is too cumbersome or you want to use all your IRA contribution room for retirement.

  10. Ideally, you would save for retirement and a home purchase simultaneously. 5-10 years is an awfully long time to put off retirement savings for a mid-term goal. That”s not to say that you have to max out an IRA to sufficiently save for retirement maybe 10-20% of your gross income is still under $5.5k/year. It”s OK to use a Roth IRA for your down payment savings because of the tax-free growth over those years, but I don”t love the idea. If you do it, I suggest you draw a clear line between the funds that are for retirement and the funds that are for a down payment. Since the two goals have different timelines, you should make different investment choices for each of them (the down payment investments should be more conservative). You also should prioritize your retirement savings getting into the Roth IRA; don”t let the down payment money use up contribution room that you would otherwise use for retirement savings. As you pointed out, you can remove contributions to a Roth IRA at any time and you can also remove $10k of earnings for a home purchase (5 years after your first contribution). It”s perfectly fine to keep your down payment investments in a taxable investment account if the Roth IRA is too cumbersome or you want to use all your IRA contribution room for retirement.

  11. Ideally, you would save for retirement and a home purchase simultaneously. 5-10 years is an awfully long time to put off retirement savings for a mid-term goal. That”s not to say that you have to max out an IRA to sufficiently save for retirement maybe 10-20% of your gross income is still under $5.5k/year. It”s OK to use a Roth IRA for your down payment savings because of the tax-free growth over those years, but I don”t love the idea. If you do it, I suggest you draw a clear line between the funds that are for retirement and the funds that are for a down payment. Since the two goals have different timelines, you should make different investment choices for each of them (the down payment investments should be more conservative). You also should prioritize your retirement savings getting into the Roth IRA; don”t let the down payment money use up contribution room that you would otherwise use for retirement savings. As you pointed out, you can remove contributions to a Roth IRA at any time and you can also remove $10k of earnings for a home purchase (5 years after your first contribution). It”s perfectly fine to keep your down payment investments in a taxable investment account if the Roth IRA is too cumbersome or you want to use all your IRA contribution room for retirement.

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  13. I am trying to fill out an application for disability. I am still trying to work but I am hurting really bad and going to many doctors. I am running out of my sick days and I am not sure what I need to do or just stop working. I have 34 years of service with Charlotte Mecklenburg Schools but don’t have the age to retirement. I feel like I am stuck but don’t know what I can do. If someone can help me with this I would appreciate it. Thank You.

    Cindy Kiser

  14. i am 67 years old and receiving my social security. my husband is retiring this month. will i be able to get social security from him as well?

  15. I have ra hurt so bad can i get ssi and disabily been married 32years divorce now have not remarried i am 62 now

  16. It’s unfair that I have been married for almost 30 years of my life, and I get almost nothing to live on because none of those marriages were over ten years in duration. (And none of my husbands died while we were married.) (I was married twice for 9 and a half years each to two husbands) But a woman who has been married less than 2 years can draw on her husband’s SS if he dies. And a woman who has been married 10 years and a day gets to draw on her ex-husband’s SS too. Why after almost 30 years of marriage must I live on about 600.00 a month and those others get over 2000.00 per month? That is very unfair.

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