Working Together for the Common Good

Multiracial Group of Friends with Hands in Stack, Teamwork

Social Security emerged from the Great Depression to promote the economic security of our nation’s people. It provides security and peace of mind for America’s workers and their families. Social Security helps protect families against loss of income when the unexpected happens, such as a disability or the loss of a loved one.

On May 1 – 8, the Social Security Administration will celebrate a special week of action by joining forces with faith-based and community groups across the country to increase awareness about the agency’s programs and services. This year’s campaign theme is “Shining a Light on Your Lifetime Protections.” The goal is to increase knowledge about tools that could change lives for the better and set them on a sound financial course.

We invite you to participate in this effort.  You can learn about your current and future Social Security benefits by creating a free my Social Security account. Easy, convenient and secure, a personal my Social Security account is the best way to accomplish a multitude of Social Security tasks online. This special week is also an excellent opportunity to tell people about myRA, the exciting new starter retirement savings plan for earners without access to a retirement plan at work.  Visit the campaign website to learn how you can help spread the message about securing today and tomorrow.

We would like to thank faith and community groups for all they do to care for their neighbors and promote their well-being.  We look forward to continuing to work with you in the days ahead.

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74 thoughts on “Working Together for the Common Good

  1. I guess I missed it in my church, or they weren’t involved. Oh well. Anyway, I think it is great to work with the community to make them aware of what social security is for and does. I know a couple people who have had to use it, and it is not fun to be totally dependent on the government. However, it is a necessary thing and I am glad that it is available.

  2. Where do I find an ADVOCATE to take my Disability Case as I am just about to start the process, which I have heard not one good thing, about.
    If you have used an Advocate let me know what you think and how are they paid? I hear they are compensated via the SSA? Thanks for any an all comments

    Jeffery H. Wanamaker e mail centre2001@aol.com

  3. I’ve been on Social Security Disability since 2009. I’m sure that the money that I put into Social Security was reduced by 33%. I did not have a choice to going on Social Security Disability as I was the victim of a drunk having a sofa fall on my neck and crushing the disc’s in my surgery. I’m now fused both anterior and postera and by the Grace of God, I wasn’t paralysed. In 2015. I had a nasty fall and broke my right lumbar in half, which makes it very hard for me to walk.
    I don’t know what your taking about my Social Security Card being changed to something else. I’m already in a faith based partnership with my church. I struggle each month to pay all of my bills each month and all Social Security Members were denied a raise for 2016, they cited Gas Prices, I like others do not drive anymore and I personally feel that this was a Feeble Decision and wish that the Senators and Congressmen that we elect to represent us would look into the cost of Food which has is more than 33% or more before the feeble reason that was used. I may be disabled, however that does not mean that I don’t have good sense. We all need Social Security to fight for our benefits and raises as Our Country is Not being fare to us.

  4. I was on Social Security Disability from 2000 till I turned 65 and was changed over to regular SS. I do not know why since my physical condition is even worse today in 2016?

    • Social Security disability benefits automatically change to retirement benefits when disability beneficiaries attain their full retirement age. Full retirement age (also called “normal retirement age”) had been 65 for many years. However, beginning with people born in 1938 or later, that age gradually increases until it reaches 67 for people born after 1959.
      If a person has reached his or her full retirement age (Currently 66) and is receiving Social Security retirement, they will not be eligible for disability benefits. We hope this helps

  5. I have P.T.S.D. and my common law spouse died over a year ago. I’m devastated by their death. They were the soul bread winner of the house. I’m living in shelters and on friends couches. Even in a tent outside. Can I receive disability benefits for my spouse dying? If so how do I go about applying? Thank you!
    Jay

    • Thank you for contacting us, Jared. The Social Security Act sets out a strict definition for disability. We pay disability benefits to people who are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last one year or more or to end in death. However, if a person thinks that he or she meets our definition of disability, we encourage them to apply for disability benefits as soon as they become disabled. You can apply online. Please visit our “Frequently Asked Questions” web page on disability, for more information.
      You can call our toll free number at 1-800-772-1213 for further assistance. Representatives are available Monday through Friday, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
      Also, some individuals may be eligible to receive social services from the state in which they live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. You can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services office. Or you can visit the U. S. Department of Health and Human Services web page for more information.
      We hope this information helps!

  6. How does retirement affect my SSD benefits? With 32 years of working and 5 years on SSD will it decrease once I retire at 66 years of age?

    • Social Security disability benefits automatically change to retirement benefits when disability beneficiaries attain their full retirement age. Benefits are not interrupted with this transition and the benefit amount will generally remains the same.

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