General

Social Security Program Experts Can Answer Your Important Questions

October 8, 2020 • By

Reading Time: 1 Minute

Last Updated: August 19, 2021

There are many online resources about Social Security, so it is important that you come to us as the first place for answers. You can find many of the answers about our programs and services on our Frequently Asked Questions page. We feature our most-asked questions at the top of the page to help you find answers to the most common questions quickly, like:

You can also browse by topics like:

  • Disability.
  • Social Security Payments.
  • Retirement.
  • Medicare.

You can visit our publications library for detailed information on nearly all of our topics. We make each publication available in text, audio, and downloadable formats.

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About the Author

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Comments

  1. David E.

    Will there be an increase in SS in January 2001.

    • Vonda V.

      Thanks for your question, David. We will not know if there will be a Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA) for 2021, and if so the amount of the COLA, until the Department of Labor releases information on inflation for the past year. For the latest news and updates on Social Security, please check out our Cost-Of-Living Adjustment information page.

  2. Mary E.

    When I got divorced I agree not to file on my husband social security ..it is in our divorce agreement, can I change my mind now???

    • Walt

      Heck Yes!!!

      Assuming you meet the divorced spouse qualifications for SSA, that right can’t be given away in a divorce proceeding..

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Mary, thanks for using our blog. If you are divorced and unmarried at the time of filing, you may be able to receive benefits on your ex-spouse’s record if your marriage lasted 10 years or longer. Your benefit as a divorced spouse can be equal to one-half of your ex’s full retirement amount only if you start receiving those benefits at your full retirement age. If you begin to receive benefits at age 62 or prior to your full retirement age, your benefits are reduced.

      See our Retirement Planner: If You’re Divorced for other eligibility requirements and more detailed information.

  3. tony

    Why do disabled people with an SSDI representative payee have to save more than $2000 while a SSI representative payee has to save less than $2000?

    This is discrimination against the people who work and paid for their Social Security disability insurance. The SSDI beneficiaries should be able to spend their money the way they want and keep only $2000 saved. They worked and paid for the insurance unlike the freeloaders on SSI government welfare.

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Tony, thanks for using our blog. Social Security disability beneficiaries (SSDI) do not have an income or asset limit. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions for Representative Payees web page for additional details. We hope this helps!

  4. Lucas Y.

    I was trying to sign into my account. I haven’t signed in, in awhile I have the same username and password but the site continues to tell me to create an account. Which I do not want to do. Is there help for this issue

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Lucas, thanks for using our blog. Be sure and click on “Sign In To Your Account”, and not “Create An Account”. If you are unable to sign in to your account, check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page for details on how to retrieve or change your username or password. We hope this helps!

  5. Venessa C.

    I will become 65 years old Feb. 24, 2021 next year. My name is Venessa Clark. I was told to enroll in Medicare right now. I called Medicare Administration they never answer their phone. Afraid to lose out, and miss receiving Medicare. Can I go to my Social Security office in Lutz, Florida to enroll ? There is a lot of scams here in Florida. My phone number is 4074042296. Thank you! My e-mail address is: vpiscesvirgo@gmail.com

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Venessa, thanks for using our blog. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page for details on how to sign up for Medicare. We hope this helps!

  6. DonnaJames

    I need to know how to apply for Medicare part b. I am still working but the insurance that I have on my job is not the greatest and I have to pay towards it So I would like to apply for my Medicare part be.

  7. Diana P.

    Hi, I am eligible to retire in May 2021 (66 years and 2 months-per SSA). I am very confused about Medicare Parts A, B, etc. I need this explained to me as easiest as possible. I already have my Medicare but will be working until May 2021 so I need to know when do I enroll in Medicare insurance my deadline. Also can I enroll earlier than May? Thank you so much.

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Diana, thanks for using our blog. In most cases, if you don’t sign up for Medicare when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a higher monthly premium which is why we advise people to apply for Medicare benefits as soon as they are eligible. However, if you were covered under a group health plan based on your or your spouse’s current employment, you may qualify for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) that will let you sign up for Medicare Part B. You have an 8-month SEP to sign up for Part A and/or Part B that starts at one of these times (whichever happens first):
      • The month after the employment ends
      • The month after group health plan insurance based on current employment ends.

      Usually, you don’t pay a late enrollment penalty if you sign up during a SEP.

      If you don’t qualify for an SEP, you will have to wait for the General Enrollment Period (GEP) to sign up. The GEP lasts from January 1 through March 31. Coverage would begin July 1. Most people who sign up for Part B during the GEP will have a 10 percent increase in monthly premiums for each 12-month period they did not enroll, but were eligible.

      You can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

  8. Linda J.

    I like to visit your website. All kinds of information that are needed.
    Thanks for everyone’s hard work especially with Covid and all that’s going on in our beautiful United States of America!
    Sincerely,
    Linda Jones

  9. Karen V.

    We will be applying soon, can we get an appointment to be sure we are understanding everything?

    • Vonda V.

      Hi Karen, thanks for using our blog. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

  10. Barbara W.

    Question please – in what format will the statement for 2021 be in, i.e., jpg, pdf, or what? I do not have a printer or a scanner but need to send this to my spending account for reimbursement. The jpg and pdf are the only formats they will allow. I will need to submit a copy of my new statement for 2021 but cannot go out as I’m a very high-risk person with this COVID virus still raging so I cannot go out for any copying printing services. Please advise. Thank you.

    • John J.

      You can use a conversion program.

Comments are closed.