Why I Serve

A local office Social Security employee helps a person fill out formsOn the eve of Social Security’s 80th anniversary, we want to share a personal moment with you. We usually talk about the services we offer, and why we believe offering these services is important to you and our nation.

We seldom get the opportunity to speak about our employees – those who stand behind the desk, behind the computer screen, or on the other end of the calls to our toll-free telephone service. Social Security employs more than 62,000 men and women nationwide.

Our employees’ duties range from taking a retirement application, to designing the signs posted on the walls of our field offices, to creating and editing thousands of publications, to designing and maintaining our vast computer network. Our team does this with a common goal of serving America by providing services to our nation’s most vulnerable citizens in times of personal hardship, transition, and uncertainty.

In the past few months, we asked our employees to share why they serve. Their answers, often expressed in heartfelt narratives, almost universally contained one sentiment.

I serve because I enjoy working with our public and because the services we provide matter.

Our greatest satisfaction comes from knowing that the people who need our benefits most – retirees, people with the disabilities, children, and families – receive the help they need. Social Security continues to give Americans hope and support with expanded programs that offer more than even President Franklin D. Roosevelt envisioned 80 years ago, when he signed the Social Security Act into law.

Tomorrow, we celebrate the anniversary of our program. Today, we celebrate the thousands who bring that program to life every day.

Facebooktwitterlinkedinmail

95 thoughts on “Why I Serve

  1. RE: Health and Welfare. 9th Ed. Hospitals & Asylums HA-26-7-15 http://www.title24uscode.org/haw.htm

    It has recently to my attention that the Family and Medical Leave Act of February 5, 1993 (PL-303-3)would fulfill its obligations under the Maternity Protection (Convention 183) of 2000 if women who give birth and take up to three months off, before returning to their old job whose employer may not lay them off, were automatically entitled to unemployment compensation (UC) for up to three months around the time they give birth.

    The United States is not party to the International Labor Organization (ILO) Maternity Protection (Convention 183) of 2000, the Holidays with Pay Convention (Convention 132) of 1970 or the Workers with Family Responsibilities (Convention 156) of 1981. That means any party worth its salt in the United States must make an extra free and individualized educational effort to try and uphold these conventions if we want to be well adjusted.

    Unemployment compensation (UC) seems to be the best way to fulfil our national obligations to the International Labour Organisation. A UC tax could be imposed on the rich or the cost of insuring the more than 4 million annual American births to employed and poor unemployed women alike could be born by my OASDI WILL in 2017 explained in the as of yet un-amended Act above.

    Because up to three months is considered an intolerably lengthy spell of Holiday with Pay, even taking into consideration Workers with Family Responsibilities for sick children, it might be best to insure new mothers, both employed and poor, at an equal rate of $1,000 a month for three months.. Two seat racing strollers cost more $500 used to keep up with those single aunts and uncles who are as easy to beat arm wrestling.

    As for the xenophobic immigration document and benefit thieves laid off under the taking benefits from people does not give rise to immunity under Sec. 204(c) of the Social Security Act principle, specifically for violation of people’s social security benefits under the Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees and equal protection Protocol at the behest of Obama’s “birther movement” enhanced migration documents thieves that are entrenched in U.S. Foreign Service, whose propaganda exam is not academically qualified by a degree in International Relations. The “undocumented people” are real refugees, who have often lived in the Untied States their entire life and have made bigger contributions than xenophobic laid-off SSA bureaucrats, whereas. Having an ID is a right not a freedom. It’s too bad every North American and European with an ID is too warped by fear and bureaucratically crazy to convince the free people to suffer a state ID and even more dangerous passport GPS that hacked the US Code via GPO who manufactures passports and has lots of funny tape . You’re a peon acting against the best interest of the generation x and y robbing Baby Boomers. I am Stateless, disabled and able to do the work of State, because I am currently free of oppression and don’t intentionally go around offending other people’s rights

    SSA bureaucrats would similarly benefits from admiring a degree in social work by requiring that administrative law judges (ALJs) and senior bureaucrats have a degree in social work and are able to hold the current National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics in contempt in regards to killing (via Eli Lilly brand injunction against wrongful death from counterfeit insulin information) – the hacking of their fundamental no billing and no testifying principles.

  2. since my husban has insurance at work, is 65 and will retire on his bday 9 apeil 2016, when should he apply for medicare? he will not get ss till next year. i am an adjunct instrutor without heath benefits

  3. since my husband has insurance at work, is 65 and will retire on his bday 9 april 2016, when should he apply for medicare? he will not get ss till next year. i am an adjunct instrutor without heath benefits

  4. We have had nothing but excellent experiences with the SS @ North Platter NE. We congratulate them for stellar performance!

    • We thank you for your kind words! Our employees take great pride in offering the best service possible. It’s wonderful to know our efforts are paying off. Your message helps us to know we have made a difference to those we serve every day.

  5. Thanks all of you SS WORKERS. YOU ARE VERY much appreciated in everything you do to help us.
    I am a retired educator in the south(MS) who is thankful/ grateful for your service, without you I don’t know what I would do. I’m a widow now for more than
    five yrs. I had to retire because of my severe health problems. “To God be the Glory “for sending you all to help us. THANKS AGAIN FOR YOUR SERVICE!!!!

    • Thank you! We’re pleased we can help. We will continue our efforts to meet your requirements and expectations in the years to come.

    • Thanks for your feedback! Your thoughts are important to us and we’re pleased when feedback is positive. We try hard to provide the best possible service to our customers and your satisfaction is our reward.

    • We would like to thank all of you for your good wishes during our 80th anniversary week. We appreciate your comments and feedback, and hope that you continue to use this blog to communicate with us. We work diligently to offer the best service possible to the public and continually strive to improve its quality.
      On Social Security Matters, our intent is to provide general information and educate our readers about the variety of programs that Social Security offers. We do not have access to personal records, but we will try to answer your general questions about Social Security and direct you to the appropriate resources.
      Thank you again for your support. We look forward to “building the future” with you.

  6. Dear Mr Ray Fernandez

    since my husband has insurance at work, is 65 and will retire on his bday 9 april 2016, when should he apply for medicare? he will not get ss till next year. i am an adjunct instructor without health benefits

    Reply ↓

    • Hi eliedith, I believe that we provided that information a few days ago, but if you missed it, here it is again: We advise people to file for Medicare benefits at age 65, even if they plan to continue working. If your husband is still working and is covered under a group health plan based on that employment, he may want to file for Medicare Part A (Hospital Insurance) only. However, he should speak to his personnel office, health benefits advisor, or health plan to see what’s best for him. Your husband can also apply for Medicare online.
      You may be eligible for Medicare benefits on your own record or your husband’s record at age 65.
      For his retirement benefits, he can apply three months in advance of when he wants his benefits to start, and he can complete the online application in as little as 15 minutes.
      If you or your husband have specific questions, call us at 1-800-772-1213 between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. Wait times are generally shorter if you call later in the week.

        • We would like to thank all of you for your good wishes during our 80th anniversary week. We appreciate your comments and feedback, and hope that you continue to use this blog to communicate with us. We work diligently to offer the best service possible to the public and continually strive to improve its quality.
          On Social Security Matters, our intent is to provide general information and educate our readers about the variety of programs that Social Security offers. We do not have access to personal records, but we will try to answer your general questions about Social Security and direct you to the appropriate resources.
          Thank you again for your support. We look forward to “building the future” with you.

  7. just had the most lovely lady help me. her name is Patricia and i didn’t get a chance to thank her. she spent so much time and answered all my questions and banished all my worries. i have no idea what state she is in, but wherever she is, i send gratitude that Patricia answered my phone call.
    i am always amazed when the phone is answered, knowing you are helping 50 million of us. thank you thank you thank you.

    • You are welcome, Heide, and thank you for letting us know that we were able to help you. Patricia and the rest of us appreciate your kind words letting us know that our efforts are paying off.

  8. But that’s not why I choose to serve today. I serve because every time I see a military member reunited with his family, my eyes well up with tears.

  9. I serve because others should never be forced to. Because it’s a choice nobody else should make again on our behalf. There are very few jobs out there in which employees agree to giving their life as a potential cost of doing business.

Leave a Reply - (comment policy)

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *