General

Seasonal Work While Getting Social Security

December 12, 2019 • By

" "Many people pick up side jobs when the holiday shopping season comes around. It’s a good way for you to make some extra income during the busy season or ease back into working if you have been out of the labor force for a while. We’re here to help you navigate working seasonally if you get Social Security.

You can get Social Security retirement or survivors benefits and work at the same time. But if you’re younger than full retirement age and earn more than certain amounts, your benefits will be reduced, although not dollar for dollar. Your benefits may increase when you reach full retirement age. You can read more about working while retired.

If you receive Social Security disability benefits or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), special rules also make it possible for people to work and still receive monthly payments. If you want to try working again, seasonal work may help you ease back into the work force. Read Working While Disabled or visit our Ticket to Work website for more information.

We also have an easy-to-share video introducing people to Ticket to Work.

Keep in mind that you must report all earnings, including your seasonal earnings, to Social Security. Your earnings also count toward your future benefits. You earn Social Security credits when you work in a job and pay Social Security taxes. We use your total yearly earnings to figure your Social Security credits. You can learn more by reading How You Earn Credits.

Having a job can bring positive change to your life in a number of ways, providing independence, fulfillment, and community involvement. Social Security is here to help. Please share this information with friends and family.

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About the Author

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Comments

Please review our Comment Policy before leaving a comment.

  1. James Dillon

    Do u have too pay taxes when you collect SSI

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Thanks for your question, James. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is not taxable. However, under current law, the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) considers Social Security benefits taxable income for beneficiaries whose countable income exceeds certain limits. For more information, please visit here. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  2. Nancy E. Allen

    I will report my seasonal wage earnings, and anything further, if hired permanently.

    Reply
  3. Smith Miller

    When you use your personal vehicle for office purpose it’s better to have commercial auto insurance than a personal/common vehicle insurance.

    Reply
  4. Linda M Richards

    My husband is 74 years old already collecting his SS. He still work’s part time three day’s a week. When he decides to stop working totally will his SS check get adjusted because of earning the extra credits while working his part time job these past ten yrs plus?

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Linda. Thanks for your question. Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your husband’s earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute his retirement benefit, we will recalculate his benefit amount. Generally, we will send a letter explaining any increase in his benefit amount. For more information, visit our Benefits Planner: Getting Benefits While Working. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  5. Alexis Baltazar

    I’m trying to make an appointment for the ticket to work i went to 2 agencies and noone wants to help I been waiting already a year no phone call or email 3106581375

    Reply
  6. KupavatClild

    Asking questions are genuinely fastidious thing if you are not understanding something completely, but this piece of writing provides good understanding yet.

    You expressed it really well!

    Reply
  7. Linda Connell

    I am getting phone messages daily, 3 today, saying my social security number has been compromised. I must contact this law enforcement officer immediately or a warrent for my arrest will be issued. The calls have been coming daily for the last week.
    I have reported these calls several years ago and now they have begun again.

    Reply
  8. Hospitals & Asylums

    Excerpt from Winter Solstice Vol. 19 No. 4 http://www.title24uscode.org/winter2019.html

    After some of the bubbly, “high blood” according to Central Operations form, I am going on a walkabout to strengthen my heart for the Summer Solstice budget of the largest economy in the world, without the statin addiction of a city-dweller. I shall have to use the State Department revolt as my travel document until the Congressional Budget Requests are done, for summary on a beach without any Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus near a 40 cents per gallon water dispenser or mountain pass without snow. The Oregon Supreme Court is asked to vote $1,040 (2019) + 2.8% to $1,069 (2020) and may publish all the sordid details. Gloves and #4 cone returned, neighbors’ car reported stolen by police. The morally torturous order SSA must adopt to protect the public from monoclonal antibodies and nosocomial infection is that “it is not okay to wear gloves with the outgoing mail”, although gloves are obviously in order to process incoming government mail. Work only when well, pre-existing conditions impair detection. The Dec. 2 decision to re-open local offices full time must take into consideration that workers must be paid equal wages to heal from their last unlawful exposure. One day on, two weeks in an Epsom salt bath. It is painfully obvious that Social Security must resolve not to enter mailing and residential addresses into the computer under Art. 28 of the Fourth Geneva Convention Relative to the Protection of Civilians in Times of War (1949). Anthony J. Sanders, Hospitals & Asylums v. Andrew Saul, Commissioner of Social Security. Oregon Disability Determination Claim No. F60690. We accept 0% SNAP spending growth from 2017, the last time, after two errors, they did the math right, 3.3% annual growth thereafter.

    The proposed United Nations “regular” programme budget for 2020 Revised estimates: effect of changes in rates of exchange and inflation Report of the Secretary-General A/74/585 of 11 December 2019 recosted the request from $2,868,300 to $3,083,461,200 and adjusted the proposed budget to $3,064.970,400. Revisions to standard salary costs for 2020, including staff assessment, are based on the latest payroll experience of October 2019. Vacancy rates in 2019 declined by a percentage point to 8.6% professional and 7.1% general. The United States is reported to owe $16,241,300 of $15,417,900 total requirements owing to inflation in the United States and Swiss currency during the recent devaluation, resulting in a net decrease of $31.5 million, testimony to the cost-effectiveness of currency devaluation as an economic anti-depressant under 19USC§4421 and 22USC§5301. Exchange rate fluctuations reflect net decreased requirements resulting from the strengthening of the United States dollar, mainly against the Swiss franc (0.974 v. 0.947), the Euro (0.890 v. 0.835), the Chilean peso (803.140 v. 659.286), and the Ethiopian birr (30.237 v. 27.409), offset in part by the weakening of the United States dollar against 64 currencies, mainly the new Israeli shekel (3.450 v. 3.540) and the Thai baht (30.220 v. 32.100). The United Nations appreciates that the United States has agreed to pay its full 22% share 2020 – $674,293,488. UN regular budget arrears would be received as voluntary contributions, something the United States has never done before, and is requested to do with 2.5% inflation from FY 2016. PL 480 International Agricultural Assistance Program must be restarted 3% annual growth from FY 2016, other civilian international assistance programs and federal government 2.5% from FY 2016 following the example of the United Nations proposed programme budget. Arrears for UNESCO and UNRWA are in order.

    2020 Annual Report of the Supplemental Security Income Program: Letter of Intent HA-20-11-19 http://www.title24uscode.org/ssi2020.pdf

    To end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030. A BILL To repeal the Adjustment to Contribution Base in Sec. 230 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§430 and replace it with: SSI Trust Fund. There is created in the Treasury a Supplemental Security Income Trust Fund to end child poverty by 2020 and all poverty by 2030. To overrule the 2.37% DI tax rate for 2018 and amend the effective DI tax rate to 2.05% (2018), 1.95% (2019), 1.91% or 2.0% (2020) in Sec. 201(b)(1)(T)(U)(V) of the Social Security Act under 42USC§401(b)(1)(T)(U)(V) with data from the 2019 Annual Report. To make a concerted effort to end poverty Congress must amend the federal minimum wage from $7.25 an hour to ‘$7.50 in 2020 and 3% more every year thereafter.’ under 29USC§206(a)(1)(D). The Labor Secretary is tasked with estimating the cost to unemployment contributors of 6 months maternity protection or sabbatical every ten years and 3 weeks annual holiday/sick pay. To prevent federal revenue loss and economic depression the Treasurer must terminate and Congress repeal Withholding of income tax on the wages of non-resident aliens under 26USC§1441 phobia. To increase the $14,294 billion debt ceiling $500 billion annually to $14,794 billion (2018), $15,294 billion (2019) and $15,794 billion (2020) under 31USC§3101. To amend the due date of the Annual Report from April 1, April’s Fool Day to June 20-21, Summer Solstice, in Sec. 1161 of the Social Security Act under 42USC§1320c-10, and expect to receive the first consolidated Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of Social Security Administration. To charge Medicaid prices for all and delete Medicare you may be b(k)illed letter hyperinflation. Be it enacted in the House and Senate Assembled

    Reply
  9. peter henshaw jr

    you card mail 69 port monmuth rd

    Reply
  10. Adriana

    I dont receive The social of my baby i Need it!!!!!! Information please

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Adriana. For your security, we do not have access to private information in this venue. We ask that members in our Blog community work with our offices with specific questions. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., for assistance. Generally, you will have a shorter wait if you call later in the day. You can also contact your local Social Security office. We hope this helps.

      Reply

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