General, Online Services

New Online Options to Repay Overpayments

August 26, 2021 • By

Last Updated: August 27, 2021

couple viewing information on a laptop togetherWe’re pleased to announce that we’ve expanded the online options for you to repay overpayments. If you have an overpayment debt, you may be eligible to make a full or partial payment using Pay.gov or your bank’s online bill pay option. Pay.gov is a secure online service provided by the Department of the Treasury. Only individuals who are not currently receiving Social Security benefits and Supplemental Security Income payments, but need to pay back an overpayment, may use this service.

Using Pay.gov to Make Your Payment

Our billing notices now include the Pay.gov website information as well as a new Remittance ID. The Remittance ID is a 10-digit alphanumeric number used instead of your Social Security number for online payments.

You can easily make a payment by following these steps:

  • Use the link in your billing notice or visit Treasury’s secure payment site at Pay.gov.
  • Enter “Social Security” in the search box.
  • Click on “Continue” under the Repay Your Social Security Overpayment Online section.
  • Follow the instructions on the following page and click “Continue to the Form.”
  • Enter the Remittance ID number found on your billing notice and repayment amount.
  • Enter your name, address, and phone number in required fields.
  • Follow the remaining prompts to complete your payment.

You will receive an email receipt confirming your payment.

Using Your Bank’s Online Bill Pay Option to Make Your Payment

A second option is to use your bank’s online bill pay feature. You can repay an overpayment debt and have it applied to your overpayment balance the next day. Only individuals who are not currently receiving Social Security benefits or Supplemental Security Income payments, but need to pay back an overpayment, may use this service.

You can conveniently make a payment using this option by following these steps:

  • Use your bank or financial institution’s online bill pay option and search for “Social Security Administration” as the Payee.
  • Enter the Remittance ID number found on your billing notice as your “Account Number” and your mailing address.
  • Enter the desired repayment amount and indicate whether you would like it to be a recurring payment.
  • Follow the remaining prompts to complete your payment.

These new payment options provide secure and convenient online ways to meet your needs. You can learn more on our Pay an Overpayment page. Please share this information with your friends and family—and post it on social media.


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About the Author

Darlynda Bogle, Acting Deputy Commissioner for Communications

Comments

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  1. Mr S.

    Repay Overpayments?! Hmm…
    I have no money left during pandemic. How can i pay my bills? I think government should cancel all the bills next 4 years to solve my problems(a common man problems). Regards Satta King

    Reply
  2. Foobia

    Tanck You – https://musicfaz.ir

    Reply
  3. Gracey

    That’s an amazing post this blog. Thanks for sharing this. This is the collection of Telegram Group Links.

    Reply
  4. Mike J.

    Thanks for this great information https://bit.ly/3yJtrL9

    Reply
  5. Joseph L.

    Why is it that SSA recipients always have overpayments? We are not calculating our own payments and do not have the computer hardware/software as SSA does to produce the final outcome of our benefits. Also, SSA has all our records and should come closer to the final outcome of our payment benefits.

    Instead of just creating a method to repay benefits that more than likely recipients didn’t create themselves, how about also creating a way that US citizens overseas can create their “My Social Security Account”? We are also SSA recipients and US citizens. Not doing so is unfair and long overdue.

    Reply
    • Deborah N.

      My friend reached her retirement and when she was contacted by an ss representative about her monthly income, she was asked about receiving back payments to the date which she reached retirement age. She said no, she didn’t want to do that but hen changed her mind after the call. She has been in a snare of certified correspondence, dropped phone calls where each time they start look at the last correspondence and not what the initial problem was, and mixed up timing of communications via mail. What can she do to speak with or email with someone who can look at the overall problem and fix it? It doesn’t seem to be a huge deal but it’s extremely frustrating since she can’t stay connected with someone who can help her? Any advice would be appreciated. The office in St. Paul is closed due to Covid.

      Reply
      • Patty

        Hi Deborah. We are sorry to hear about the difficulty your friend is having working with us. For her security we do not have private information in this venue. We encourage her to continue working with her local office and ask to speak to a supervisor. We hope this helps.

        Reply
  6. Tom

    Just started a repayment agreement owing 50K with maximum allowed monthly payment of 174.00 a month. If I make a lump sum payment of 10K can I then lower my monthly payment.
    Thanks

    Reply
    • Patty

      Hi Tom. For your security, we do not have access to private information in this venue. Your local office will be able to assist you with the lump sum payment and your request to consider a lesser withholding amount from your benefits. For more information and to learn about how to appeal an overpayment or ask to pay a lower rate of recovery, check out our Coronavirus web page under “Overpayments”. If you still have questions, or need further assistance, please call your local office. Look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  7. Jeanne B.

    Why did SSA change my election date to two months earlier than I elected and reduce my benefit?

    Reply
    • Patty

      For your security, Jeanne, we do not have access to private information in this venue. We ask that members in our Blog community work with our offices for specific questions. Please continue to work with your local Social Security office. Look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  8. Bettye B.

    I would like for someone to explain to me what is the Dollar amount of your yearly salary can be considered as Substantial Earnings. Every time I ask the questions no one will give be an answer. They just change the subject.

    Reply
    • Patty

      Hi Bettye. It sounds like you are asking about Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) earnings. Social Security has special rules that make it possible for people with disabilities receiving Social Security Disability (SSDI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI) to work and still receive monthly payments. These are called work incentives.

      For SSDI beneficiaries, there is a Trial Work Period (TWP) and then an Extended Period of Eligibility (EPE). The TWP allows you to test your ability to work for at least 9 months. During this period, you will receive your full disability benefit regardless of how much you earn as long as your work activity is reported and you continue to have a disabling impairment. In 2021, any month in which earnings exceed $940 is considered a month of the 9-month trial work period.

      Once you’ve completed your TWP, you get a 36-month safety net called the EPE. During the EPE, you get benefits for all months your earnings or work activities are below the Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level as long as you continue to have a disabling impairment. Social Security will suspend cash benefits for months earnings are over SGA and start benefits again if earnings fall below the SGA level. In 2021, you are earning SGA if your earnings, after any allowable deductions, are more than $1,310 in a month.

      Check out Social Security’s Red Book for descriptions of the many work incentives.

      Reply
  9. Tera L.

    I need a verification letter

    Reply
    • Vonda

      Hi Tera, thanks for using our blog. Check out our Frequently Asked Questions web page for details on how to get a benefit verification letter. This letter is sometimes called a budget letter, a benefits letter, a proof of income letter or a proof of award letter. You also may be able to request a benefit verification letter by using our automated telephone service at 1-800-772-1213. You can conduct the automated services 24 hours a day. At the prompt, indicate that you’re requesting a proof of income letter. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  10. Arwel O.

    Great news! I think we must follow Eastern European countries when considering online shift of governmental and banking operations. I mean that in Ukraine e-passport is now equals to paper one in its juridical power and it is amazing. That’s why neobanking and government-as-a-service concept is successful here.

    Reply

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