Online Services, Retirement

New Fact Sheets Added to Your Online Statement

April 1, 2021 • By

Last Updated: April 2, 2021

New Fact Sheets Added to Your Online Statement

Your Social Security Statement, available on my Social Security, tells you how much you or your family can expect to receive in disability, survivor, and retirement benefits.

We’ve added new fact sheets to accompany the online Statement. These new fact sheets provide clarity and useful information, based on your age group and earnings situation. They can also help you better understand Social Security programs and benefits.

You can access your Statement and the new fact sheets using your personal my Social Security account.

The new Statement fact sheets cover the following topics:

  • Retirement readiness for workers in four different age groups.
  • Workers with non-covered earnings who may be subject to the Windfall Elimination Provision and Government Pension Offset.
  • Social Security basics for new workers.
  • How people become eligible for benefits (for workers not fully insured).
  • How additional work can increase your future benefits.
  • Medicare readiness for workers age 62 and up.

If you don’t have a my Social Security account, be sure to create one so you can access your Statement, fact sheets, and other useful information about Social Security. You can create your personal my Social Security account on our website.

To learn more, visit our Social Security Statement webpage. Please share these resources with your friends and family.


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About the Author

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Comments

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  1. James Jefferson

    I would kike to know a hearing loss if can claim if I received it loss completely in my LEFT ear ,on my job , years ago . I Am wearing Hearing Aids, I have been wearing them for many years due to the accident .

    Reply
    • Vonda

      Hi James, thanks for using our blog. We pay disability benefits through two programs: the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI) and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. To qualify for SSDI benefits, you must have worked long enough and recently enough in jobs covered by Social Security (usually within the last 10 years). The (SSI) program is a needs based program that gives cash assistance to disabled individuals with limited income and resources. We pay disability benefits to people who are unable to work because of a medical condition that is expected to last one year or more or to end in death. If you think you may be eligible to receive disability benefits and would like to apply, you can use our online application.

      If you are unable or would rather not apply online, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  2. Robbin

    Hello- I am trying to fill out the application for Retirement Benefits and it keeps giving me the following error message- You must answer yes to being disabled before continuing this application. I am not disabled and have called the SS phone number but they basically told me they could not help me and set up a phone appointment which is over a month away and I turn 62 in August. Can anyone help with this

    Reply
    • Vonda

      Thanks for your question, Robbin. You can apply for Social Security retirement benefits when you are at least 61 years and 9 months of age and want your benefits to start in the next three months. You can complete the online application for Social Security retirement benefits in as little as 15 minutes.

      To begin receiving reduced retirement benefits at 62, you are required to be age 62 for the entire month. For SSA purposes, individuals born on the first or second day of the month are considered age 62 for the “full” month and could be entitled to benefits for the month of their 62nd birthday. However, if born on the 3rd or later, you must wait a month. If you’re 62 on August 3rd of later, you’re eligible for Social Security retirement benefits beginning in September. Social Security benefits are paid the month after they are due. So, if you want your benefits to begin with September, you will receive your first benefit payment in October. The exact payment date is determined by your date of birth. For future pay days, you may find the Schedule of Social Security Payments calendars useful.

      Reply
  3. Gail Amis

    I am on ssdi when I turn 65 will my amount of money go up

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Gail. Thanks for your question. When you reach full retirement age, we will automatically convert your disability benefits to retirement benefits, but the amount remains the same. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  4. James C

    When I receive my disability payment is it for the prior month or the following month?

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, James. Social Security benefits are paid the month after the month they are due. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payments are paid the month they are due. If you have additional questions, please call us toll-free at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Thanks!

      Reply
  5. Darrin r mendonca

    Hi sorry to beg you I am disabled 58 years old I had 3 big back surgeries I had to retire early from doctors,,plus they want to do one more but some doctors said it would be very long surgery plus dangerous to what I am getting at I have daughter trying to get benefits for it’s been 6 months no answer yet I had many social security people write to Baltimore but still nothing she was okay from social security for benefits but no answer why thank you .

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Darrin. We are sorry to hear about your condition and situation. For your security, we do not have access to private information in this venue. We ask that members in our Blog community work with our offices with specific questions. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., for assistance. Generally, you will have a shorter wait if you call later in the day. You can also contact your local Social Security office. Look for the general inquiry telephone number under Show Additional Office Information. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  6. Mary Utley Boswell RN

    I’m still confused about my amount of benefits. I worked my entire life. And when I became disabled in 2005, I was told I would get a certain amount and nothing else. I worked at age 22-25 for Cottonwood cabanas in Memphis, Tn. And my married name then was Mary u Walker. I never got any funds for this job. I also worked at The ,Downtowner corporation on Union Avenue for 3 years in Memphis,.Tn. With the same name. I never got funds for them either. Is it because of my married name or what? Or was it because they both went bankrupt. I still should have gotten my SS funds they took out every 2 weeks. And my first husband, Johnny Curbo , died last year and my 3 rd husband, Dr Richard Boswell is retired now. I’m single and never remarried. Do I get more funds from Curbo or Boswell? I truly need it. At least from one of them. Thanks. Mary Utley,Walker,Curbo, Boswell.

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Mary. Thanks for your questions. First, to correct your earnings record, you will need to provide us evidence of your earnings, such as W-2s, pay stubs, etc. If you don’t have the evidence that we require, call your former employers to find out if they can help you. Once you’ve obtained your evidence, call our toll-free number at 1-800-772-1213 (TTY 1-800-325-0778). Representatives are available Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. You can also contact your local Social Security office for assistance. Second, if the marriage to your first husband lasted for at least 10 years, you may be eligible for surviving divorced spouse benefits based on your ex-husband’s earnings, beginning at age 60. If you are disabled, you may qualify for benefits as early as age 50 if the disability started before or within 7 years of your ex-husband’s death. For additional information on Survivor benefits, check out our Survivors Planner. Finally, to be eligible for divorced spouse benefits on your third husband, you had to be married to your former spouse for at least 10 years, and you cannot be eligible for a higher benefit on your own record. For more information on how to qualify for divorced spouse benefits, visit our Benefits Planner: If You Are Divorced. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  7. Jessica L. Curran

    Hi, my name is Jessica and I had been on SSDI for a number of years. I got married and my spouses income was to great for me to stay on SSDI. I lost it. My earnings record shows me I don’t have enough credits to collect Social Security benefits on my record. I’m still disabled. What happens when I turn 62 or so? I know if my spouse should die I can collect some benefits off his record I am told. I want to be ready and informed as to my options.

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Jessica. We are sorry to hear about your condition. To qualify for spouse’s benefits, your spouse must be receiving retirement or disability benefits. Keep in mind that if you qualify for your own benefits and for benefits as a spouse, we always pay your own benefits first. If your benefits as a spouse are higher than your own benefits, you will get a combination of benefits equaling the higher spouse benefit. Visit here for more information. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  8. MAHAMMED ABDALA

    IWANT URgenj help ,ilove u7a,IHAVFE NO MONEY

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Mahammed. We are sorry to hear about your situation. For your security, we do not have access to private information in this venue. We ask that members in our Blog community work with our offices with specific questions. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., for assistance. Generally, you will have a shorter wait if you call later in the day. You can also contact your local Social Security office. Also, you may be eligible to receive social services from the state in which you live. These services include free meals, housekeeping help, transportation, or help with other problems. To get information about services in your area and find out if you qualify, you will need to contact your state or local social services or welfare office. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  9. Robert McCarthy

    I am retired. If I go back to work and pay into social security again, will my future benefits go up?

    Reply
    • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi, Robert. Thanks for your question. Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. Generally, we will send a letter explaining any increase in your benefit amount. For more information, visit our Frequently Asked Questions. We hope this helps.

      Reply
      • Jessica M Ross

        Think u

        Reply
      • Elisa

        Hi Ann, I had a similar question, however, if I take social security at 62 and continue to work my same job with same pay, will that still increase the benefit each year? I am a little confused as to how it works if you take social security before full retirement age. Thank you

        Reply
        • Ann C., Public Affairs Specialist

          Hi, Elisa. If an individual is eligible to retire at age 62, we use the highest 35 years of earnings to compute an individual’s benefit amount.

          Each year we review the records for all working Social Security recipients to see if additional earnings may increase monthly benefits. If your earnings for the prior year are higher than one of the years we used to compute your retirement benefit, we will recalculate your benefit amount. Generally, we will send a letter explaining any increase in your benefit amount. For more information, please visit our Frequently Asked Questions. We hope this helps.

          Reply
      • Alicia García escobedo

        To whom May concern

        Due to serious spinal cord and most of work home etc have been force to seek suport in Mexico
        While I want to go home I medically can’t plus will be homeless
        How can I access I get my login have try to reach fir support in many areas this is one
        Plus I had not received stimulus
        I’m seeking support to my tax and finally found a tax prepare so I just request extension.
        Can you help

        Reply

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