If You Have a Disability, Social Security Can Help

Father and two daughters October is Disability Awareness Month. For Social Security, disability is always at the forefront of our conversations. We hear stories daily about Americans living with disabling conditions who need help from the system they contributed to during their working life. Their stories make us proud of the work we do.

Through our Faces and Facts of Disability website, we share the stories about what it means to receive disability benefits from Social Security. The site highlights some of the people who benefit from our programs. We believe that learning the facts and hearing peoples’ stories about disability allows for a better understanding of what’s perhaps the most misunderstood Social Security program.

The Social Security Act sets a very strict definition of disability. Social Security pays benefits to insured people who can’t work because they have a medical condition that is expected to last at least one year or result in death. The impairment must be so severe that it renders the person unable to perform not only his or her previous work, but also any other substantial work.

Social Security doesn’t provide temporary or partial disability benefits. Because the eligibility requirements are so strict, our disability beneficiaries are among the most severely impaired people in the country. Our new online resources, the state disability fact sheets and our national disability issue paper, provide specific information about our recipients’ demographics by state and congressional district. These resources are proof of Social Security’s economic impact and benefit to our most vulnerable citizens.

Disability is something we don’t like to think about, or we may think it can’t happen to us. But the odds of becoming disabled are greater than we realize. The Social Security disability program excels in providing services to people when they need it the most.

For us, disability has faces and names — among them Larry, Kiera, Ebbie, Charlotte, Jamie, and Christine. We want to invite you to come see their faces, and learn the facts. They are truly at the heart of what we do.

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584 thoughts on “If You Have a Disability, Social Security Can Help

  1. October 21, 2019.
    To whom it may concern. I am a caregiver for my sister who has Cerabal Palsy, asthma, seizure disorder and mental retardation. I had our home modified for her disability and now we are worried about having our home in foreclosure.
    This is the company: Select Portfolio Servicing that is requesting for funds , that we don’t have to pay off a loan that our father did, not us.
    So I need some help on keeping our home and information on how to do this.
    Please help us. I am Linda Reyna and I am her Legal Guardian and Conservator for her.
    We have until November 2019 to come up with the funds that SPS wants.
    Sincerely:
    Linda Reyna.

    • Hi, Troy. You may be eligible to receive social services from the state in which you live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. To find out whether you may qualify and if you need to file a separate application call the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services at 1-800-633-4227 (TTY, 1-877-486-2048). You also can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services or welfare office. We hope this helps!

    • First of all, thank you for your service to your country. Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits are based on earnings and are not subject to income and resource limits. VA benefits will not affect your SSDI benefit but would affect a person’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit. To learn what types of income can affect SSI payments, go here. We hope this helps.

  2. My wife has had heart attack, she has rheumatoid arthritis, and she has non alcoholic liver cirrhosis she draws social security off me she $800.00 a month I draw 2,153.00 a month we have a house payment of $1,000 a month car payment plus all our other regular bills I have Medicare she will be 64 in July can she get disability or a medical card

    • Hi, Terry. We are sorry to hear about your wife’s condition and your situation. For your security, we do not have access to private information in this venue. We ask that members in our Blog community work with our offices with specific questions. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213, Monday through Friday, between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m., for assistance. Generally, you will have a shorter wait if you call later in the day. You can also contact your local Social Security office. Also, you may be eligible to receive social services from the state in which you live. These services include Medicaid, free meals, housekeeping help, transportation or help with other problems. To find out whether you may qualify and if you need to file a separate application call the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services at 1-800-633-4227 (TTY, 1-877-486-2048). You also can get information about services in your area from your state or local social services or welfare office. We hope this helps.

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