Health Care

Compassionate Allowances: Five Conditions Added to Fast Track

August 27, 2020 • By

Processing disability claims quickly and accurately is important to us.  It is through this commitment to you that we use the Compassionate Allowances program to help us identify and fast-track cases where people have medical conditions and diseases that are most likely to meet Social Security’s standards for disability benefits.

In August, we added five conditions — Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors, GM1 Gangliosidosis – Infantile and Juvenile Forms, Nicolaides-Baraister Syndrome, Rubinstein-Tybai Syndrome, and Secondary Adenocarcinoma of the Brain — to this essential list.  Additions to the list allow us to ensure that anyone with qualifying disabilities can receive the benefits they need quickly.

“Social Security’s top priority is to serve the public, and we remain committed to improving the disability determination process for Americans,” said Commissioner Saul.  “Our Compassionate Allowances program gets us one step closer to reaching our goals by helping us accelerate the disability process for people who are likely to get approved for benefits due to the severity of their condition.”

The Compassionate Allowances program quickly identifies claims where the applicant’s condition or disease clearly meets our statutory standard for disability.  Due to the severe nature of many of these conditions, these claims are often allowed based on medical confirmation of the diagnosis alone.  To date, more than 600,000 people with severe disabilities have been approved through this accelerated, policy-compliant disability process.  Over the last decade, the list has grown to a total of 242 conditions, including certain cancers, adult brain disorders, and a number of rare disorders that affect children.

We incorporate leading technology to identify potential Compassionate Allowances and make quick decisions.  When a person applies for disability benefits, we must obtain medical records in order to make an accurate determination.  Our Health IT brings the speed and efficiency of electronic medical records to the disability determination process.  With electronic records transmission, we are able to quickly obtain a claimant’s medical information, review it, and make a determination faster than ever before.

Please share the Compassionate Allowances program with friends and family who may need these vital benefits.


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About the Author

Mike Korbey, Deputy Commissioner for Communications

Mike Korbey, Deputy Commissioner for Communications

Mike Korbey, Deputy Commissioner for Communications

Comments

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  1. Evelio Santiago Cuadrado

    Still have not received the Economic Impact Payment of $1,200.00. Instead of depositing it directly to my bank account in the U.S. the payment must have been sent to my 1040 address in Guatemala where the postal system has been indefinitely suspended.
    Evelio Santiago Cuadrado, SS *** – ** – ***.
    (502) 5318-2063 cuadradoevelio@hotmail.com

    Reply
    • Jerry

      Why would you have your 10:40 sent to an address out of the country? Seems like you screwed yourself up on this one buddy

      Reply
  2. Evelio Santiago Cuadrado

    Await your action and solution. Please process my inquiry through the proper channels so that I have the $1,200.00 Economic Impact Payment credited to my U.S. bank account, as it was originally intended. Have already contacted your IRS Austin Refund Inquiry Unit in Auxtin, Texas on May 10, 2020 and June 1, 2020, having not received any reply or action.

    Reply
  3. Wendy Wilken

    I received a stimulus around April. I’m on SSD. I don’t earn enough to file taxes. However my mom died in January of 2019 so I did have to file her 2018 taxes. Should I have qualified to recieve a stimulus check for filing taxes in 2019 for the taxes in 2018?

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi Wendy, thank you for your question. Please visit the IRS Economic Impact Payments Information Center to answer your questions about eligibility, payment amounts, what to expect, when to expect it and more. If you are unable to find the answer, call the IRS hotline at 1-800-919-9835. Thanks!

      Reply
  4. Gina

    I recieve suplamentry insurance. I am 54 and recieve my $1200. There is a possablity that I qualifi throufg EDD for a special program that would give me more money. Would that cansel my $900 I already recive to live on?

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi Gina, thanks for using our blog. Supplemental Security Income (SSI) is a needs based program so a change in your income and assets can affect your benefits and it must be reported. You can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  5. Aida C.Albos

    I am on SSI but I had 2 major heart surgeries2:2hearrt valves replacements & Pacemaker Implant simultaneously…, am I eligible to file SSDI on account of my current situation. Let me know please. Thank you

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi Aida, thanks for using our blog. We pay disability benefits through two programs: the Social Security Disability Insurance program (SSDI) and the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. To qualify for SSDI benefits, you must have worked long enough and recently enough in jobs covered by Social Security (usually within the last 10 years). To find out if you’re insured for SSDI, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  6. DAVID BRIDGES

    To meet the qual.,for SSI WHERE CAN I FIND THESE, ALSO NOT TO WASTE EVERYONE’S TIME DOES P.D. WITH ALLOF ITS SIDE EFFECTS QUALIFY YOU FOR SSI. ONE MORE QUESTION ISN’T THERE APROGRAM TO HELP WITH FUNDING FOR A FAMILY TO HELP WITH EXPENSIVES FOR SOMEONE WHO IS HOMEBOUND AND CANNOT BE BY THEMSELVES AND YET BE ABLE TO STAY HOME RATHER TO GO INTO A PERMANENT PLACE AWAY FROM HOME, I am thinking of myself and yet creating a salary for my wife to watch every step I take, because I am falling about every other step I take.

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Hi David, thanks for using our blog. To get SSI, you must be disabled, blind, or at least 65 years old and have “limited” income and resources. Check out our Understanding SSI web page for details.

      If you have additional questions, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator . The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  7. Ashley Amber

    Thankyou so much Really You have given Valuable information

    Reply
  8. Tamie Trent

    Does liver cirrhosis qualify you for disability Due to diabetes and hypertension and heart disease

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Thanks for your question, Tamie. Social Security pays disability benefits to people if they have a medical condition that has prevented them from working or is expected to prevent them from working for at least 12 months. We use the same five-step process to make a decision on each application. You may find our listing of impairments useful. We hope this helps.

      Reply
  9. Nathan S

    I am retired and started collecting SS 3 months ago . I have a child below 18 years. He could qualify for SSI disability but my resources could not qualifies him for SSI. Can I just get him benefits as dependent under my record for now? Then later he can apply for SSI once he is 18 or adult? Thanks for your clarification in advance. .

    Reply
    • Vonda VanTil, Public Affairs Specialist

      Thank you for using our blog, Nathan. When a parent gets Social Security retirement benefits or disability benefits, his or her child also may get benefits. The child can be a biological child, adopted child or stepchild.

      To get benefits, the child must be unmarried and:
      • Younger than age 18;
      • A full-time student (no higher than grade 12) 18 to 19 years old; or
      • Have a disability that started before age 22 and is 18 years or older.

      See our factsheet on Benefits for Children for more information.

      To apply for benefits for your child, you can call us at 1-800-772-1213 for assistance or you can contact your local Social Security office. Please look for the general inquiry telephone number at the Social Security Office Locator. The number may appear under Show Additional Office Information. Please be aware that our call wait times are longer than normal. We hope this information helps.

      Reply
  10. Johnny

    This is actually a very good development, thank you.
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    Reply

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