Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

About Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Darlynda Bogle, Assistant Deputy Commissioner

Social Security Secures Today and Tomorrow for Workers and Their Families

Social Security has tools, information, and services to help secure today and tomorrow for you and your family.

When you start receiving Social Security benefits, certain members of your family may also qualify for benefits on your record. Benefits may be paid to:

  1. Your spouse — To qualify for benefits, your spouse must be age 62 or older or be taking care of your minor child. We may ask for proof of marriage, and dates of prior marriages, if applicable.
  2. Your children — To qualify for benefits, your eligible child can be your biological child, adopted child or stepchild. We’ll need their Social Security numbers and birth certificates.
  3. Your adult child disabled before age 22 — To qualify for children’s benefits under our disability program, your disabled adult child must meet Social Security’s strict definition of disabled. A person is disabled under the Social Security Act if he or she can’t work due to a severe medical condition that has lasted, or is expected to last, at least one year or result in death.
  4. Your divorced spouse — If you are divorced, even if you have remarried, your ex-spouse may qualify for benefits on your record. If you have a divorced spouse who qualifies for benefits, it will not affect the amount of benefits you or your family may receive.

When you work, some of the Social Security taxes you pay now go toward survivors benefits for your family. The benefit amount your family is eligible for depends on your average lifetime earnings. The more you earned, the more your family’s benefits will be. You can visit our Benefits Planner to help them better understand Social Security’s family benefits as they plan for their financial future.

Visit our website to learn how we’re with you throughout life’s journey.

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Making Wise Choices When a Representative Payee Manages Your Money

" "Some of the millions of people who get monthly Social Security or Supplemental Security Income benefits need help managing this money. A person assigned to help you manage your monthly benefits is called a representative payee. We may decide you need a representative payee if we receive information that indicates you need help to manage your money. We try to select someone who knows you and wants to help you. Your representative payee should be someone who you trust, who sees you often, and who clearly understands your needs.

A representative payee receives your monthly benefits on your behalf and must use the money to pay for your current needs. Eligible costs include: Continue reading

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This New Year, See What You Can Do Online at SocialSecurity.gov

" "Are you looking for new ways to save time this new year? Social Security offers many of its services online by signing up for a secure my Social Security account.

Once you create an account, you can review your work history and see an estimate of your future Social Security benefits. We recently made several enhancements and introduced new features to my Social Security. With your personal my Social Security account, you can also: Continue reading

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Seasonal Work While Getting Social Security

" "Many people pick up side jobs when the holiday shopping season comes around. It’s a good way for you to make some extra income during the busy season or ease back into working if you have been out of the labor force for a while. We’re here to help you navigate working seasonally if you get Social Security.

You can get Social Security retirement or survivors benefits and work at the same time. But if you’re younger than full retirement age and earn more than certain amounts, your benefits will be reduced, although not dollar for dollar. Your benefits may increase when you reach full retirement age. You can read more about working while retired. Continue reading

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Sign Up for Medicare and Estimate Medicare Costs

" "Affordable medical coverage is something everyone wants, especially as people age. Luckily, our nation has safeguards for workers as they get older. Millions of people rely on Medicare, and it can be part of your health insurance plan when you retire.

Medicare is available for people age 65 or older, as well as younger people who have received Social Security disability benefits for 24 months, and people with certain specific diseases. Two parts of Medicare are Part A (Hospital Insurance) and Part B (Medicare Insurance). You are eligible for premium-free Part A if you are age 65 or older and you or your spouse worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years.  Part B usually requires a monthly premium payment. Continue reading

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Medicare, A Simple Explanation

Social Security and Medicare are both programs that are household names, but do you know the true difference? Both programs help safeguard millions of Americans as well as improve the quality of life for their family and friends. While Social Security offers retirement, disability, and survivors benefits, Medicare provides health insurance. Continue reading

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Social Security Benefits Increase in 2020

When we announce the annual cost-of-living adjustment (COLA), there’s usually an increase in the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit amount. Federal benefit rates increase when the cost of living rises, as measured by the Department of Labor’s Consumer Price Index (CPI-W).

The CPI-W rises when inflation increases, it makes your cost of living go up. This change means prices for goods and services, on average, are a little more expensive, so the COLA helps to offset these costs. Continue reading

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Social Security Services for the Hispanic Community

Social Security is with you throughout life’s journey. Hispanics make up our nation’s largest ethnic minority group with a population of 58.9 million, representing 18.1 percent of the nation’s total population. During Hispanic Heritage Month, we want to turn the spotlight on our services for the Hispanic community. Continue reading

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Social Security Covers Children Battling Cancer

" "The effects of cancer on our society are devastating for those directly and indirectly dealing with the disease. Sadly, thousands of people under the age of 20 are diagnosed with cancer every year, and it remains the leading cause of disease-related death for children. We honor the courage of children who are battling the many forms of cancer, as well as the young people who lost their lives to these terrible diseases.

Social Security provides benefits for children who suffer from many disabling diseases, including some forms of cancer. These benefits could help with the additional costs of caring for an ill child.  Although children haven’t paid Social Security taxes and, thus, cannot be covered for Social Security disability benefits, they may receive disability benefits through the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program. SSI pays benefits to disabled children who have limited income and resources.

If you wish to apply for benefits for your child, you’ll need to complete an application for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and a Child Disability Report. The report collects information about your child’s disabling condition, and about how it affects his or her ability to function.

Here are the steps to apply: Continue reading

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Back to School with Social Security

" "It typically takes people a lifetime of planning to reach their retirement goals. The earlier young workers know about saving for their future, the better chance they’ll have at achieving a comfortable retirement. This is why Social Security has created a resource specifically for teachers and students.

Our Information for Educators page contains a toolkit with information and resources to educate and engage students on Social Security programs and services. Within the toolkit, you’ll find: Continue reading

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