Securing Today and Tomorrow for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

little girl with familySocial Security is proud to be your friend for life. Our agency touches the life of nearly every American, no matter where they are on their journey. We are there for you and your family through births, first jobs, marriages, and when you’re ready to sail into retirement. We are proud to serve people of all races and cultures with dignity, pride, and in a way that is accessible and convenient.

During the month of May, we observe Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month in the United States. It’s a time to celebrate this strong, diverse, and culturally rich community. Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups in America. The AAPI community also has one of the fastest-growing populations of older adults. Of the nearly 38 million Social Security beneficiaries aged 65 and older, roughly 1.4 million seniors are from the AAPI community, and this number is expected to increase in the coming years.

With these growing numbers, it is especially important to make sure the AAPI community knows about the benefits, tools, services, and information Social Security has available. We have more than 1,700 AAPI bilingual public contact employees providing services in many Asian and Pacific Islander languages and dialects. Also, Social Security provides free interpreter services in many languages to individuals with limited English proficiency. Our publications are available in 17 languages, including Chinese, Hmong, Korean, Tagalog, and Vietnamese.

Our website, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, has many resources for the AAPI community. There you will find out why Social Security is especially important to the AAPI community. Knowledge is the key to preparing for tomorrow. Visit our website and learn about the various ways in which Social Security helps the AAPI community secure today and tomorrow.

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14 thoughts on “Securing Today and Tomorrow for Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders

    • Social Security retirement is not an Entitlement; it was intended to be a supplement for persons that paid into it. I have lived in the Pacific Islands. I love their people. We have taken much from a few of them; however, without tangible contribution to back any proposed Social Security payments, it is “yet another unfunded entitlement”. What funds will pay for it?

  1. It is with very mixed emotions that I am writing a reply to your information. This is “AMERICA” and we speak english. It seems to me that if we have citizens who have earned SS that still don’t know how to communicate in english something else is wrong. You are enabling these folks by providing these services and they will have little or no desire to adapt and become participating citizens. We need to get SS system back in working order and stop the “giving” away of benefits that aren’t actually earned! Lawmakers must find another source of funds to provide for all the add on programs (disability, children, etc.) that are bankrupting the SS System. If those other programs are worthwhile and justified then Congress should find some other way of funding them. Pay back those that have paid into the program and stop telling us you are running out of money!

      • You don’t seem top know what you are talking about! Norm is referring to a lot of immigrants, for one… people that were petitioned by their children and didn’t have to work but receiving SSI benefits, medical etc.

    • You clearly have no concept of what Social Security actually is. What you refer to as “add on programs (disability, children, etc)” ARE A MAJOR PART of Social Security and the funding for that COMES FROM those workers’ PAYCHECKS as FICA – if youve ever worked and drawn a paycheck, surely you’ve seen that word “FICA” printed on at least one pay stub in your life. The entire Social Security fund comes from the very people who are receiving benefits through their PAYROLL WITHHOLDING.

      Social SECURITY – emphasis on SECURITY – was meant to ensure a minimum security (meaning basic, barebones supplemental income) for people who worked, so they’ll be able to survive when they can’t work any more, whether that be due to reaching retirement age, or, becoming TOTALLY AND PERMANENTLY disabled and unable to work AT ALL before reaching retirement age. Also, if that worker DIES before reaching retirement age, Social Security benefits are provided to REPLACE A SMALL PART of that dead parent’s income that had supported their child so YOU don’t have to support the kid with government funds…it’s the PARENT WORKER’S CONTRIBUTION paying that benefit. And Social Security also pays benefits to the SPOUSE of dead workers -they draw Social Security on their dead spouse’s PAYROLL CONTRIBUTION – do you call THAT an “add-on” program???

      With Social Security Disability Insurance, or SSDI, that disabled worke only receives – at a MUCH REDUCED AMOUNT – their benefit early, but ONLY IF they have worked enough hours in rheir working life, and the amount they reveive – which never goes up (except for the mimimal COLA raises now & then) – is and based on what THEY CONTRIBUTED outbid their PAYCHECKS.

      Before you get angry about anything, it might be a good idea to KNOW THE FACTS first. You ate on the Social Security website right now so you know whete to look, obviously. Why don’t you TEAD ABOUT IT, HERE, AT THE ACTUAL OFFICIAL SOURCE instead of throwing around all kinds of attacks on people and programs based only on FALSE information you’ve “heard” or simply assumed.

      Nobody cares if you disagree with something, but you aren’t even talking about anything real. If you’ve got time to criticize on tjis blog ypu have time to read the REAL FACTS. Stop being lazy and ignorant.

  2. Last year my monthly social security payment was $1,720. Starting this year it has been reduced to $1648. I am told this is due to increased Medicare deduction. I am an Asian-American; what a cruel joke that Social Security is looking after our welfare by reducing my monthly subsistence payment. How can I survive?

    • Count yourself lucky. You receive more than the average and why shouldn’t you pay the medicare premium like everyone else?

  3. How come for the last couple of years we did not get one cent increase on our SS benefit yet we spent most part of our lives working and contributing. We see older people coming from overseas to live and babysit their grandchildren and collect hefty sum of SS and Medicare benefits without doing an hours work in this country. And we give billions and billions of dollars to other countries and our older Americans are completely neglected. The politicians only talk about middle and upper classes and
    no one ever opens their mouths on behalf of Seniors who contributed all their lives in the SS System.
    Do the politicians only work for the rich and the middle class at the expense of the elderly.
    Please respond in a layman’s language to be able to understand by us all seniors.

  4. How come they can get SS for free and we paid into it all our working years. I am 82 yrs old and SS send my husbands SS to me to handle for him as he is in a nursing home. I have to take hours of my time every year to send them a report to them of where every penny goes. My husband is disabled and una ble to do it himself. I think it is not fair how it is handled now. I am told it has to be used for my husbands needs, etc. and I am only getting 600 a month for all my needs. Something stinks here, I think.

  5. I agree with Shirley…once again…we are getting the shaft…3 years no cola….Medicare cut….to pay for outlander benefits. …disgusting

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